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This raster dataset depicts percent canopy cover derived from 1-m conifer classifications when aggregated to 30-m cells. Conifer features were classified from 2010, 2012, and 2013 NAIP Digital Ortho Quarter Quads (DOQQ) using the Feature Analyst 5.0 extension for ArcGIS 10.1. Tiles were organized and grouped by Nevada Department of Wildlife Population Management Unit (PMU) locations, plus a 10 km area beyond the PMU extent. Analysts visually identified conifers in the imagery using false color infrared settings and digitized multiple trees per tile as training locations for classification. After performing hierarchical learning and clutter removal with Feature Analyst to remove non-conifer features on output shapefiles,...
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Collaboration has taken root in national forest planning, providing expanded opportunities for stakeholder participation in decision-making, but are these processes considered meaningful by key stakeholders? Do the processes result in increased participation by key stakeholders? We present results of a study of stakeholder perspectives of a collaborative planning process on the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, and Gunnison National Forests in Western Colorado, U.S.A. The stakeholders were stratified by participation levels in order to explore a possible relationship between participation and perceptions of the collaborative process. We used a Q-methodology approach to compare and contrast perspectives across participant...
Abstract (from http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0102996): Trees are essential to urban habitats because they provide services that benefit the environment and improve human health. Unfortunately, urban trees often have more herbivorous insect pests than rural trees but the mechanisms and consequences of these infestations are not well documented. Here, we examine how temperature affects the abundance of a scale insect, Melanaspis tenebricosa (Comstock) (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), on one of the most commonly planted street trees in the eastern U.S. Next, we examine how both pest abundance and temperature are associated with water stress, growth, and condition of 26 urban street trees....
Abstract (from http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0059687): Cities profoundly alter biological communities, favoring some species over others, though the mechanisms that govern these changes are largely unknown. Herbivorous arthropod pests are often more abundant in urban than in rural areas, and urban outbreaks have been attributed to reduced control by predators and parasitoids and to increased susceptibility of stressed urban plants. These hypotheses, however, leave many outbreaks unexplained and fail to predict variation in pest abundance within cities. Here we show that the abundance of a common insect pest is positively related to temperature even when controlling for other habitat...
Abstract (from http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0111669): Projected climate change at a regional level is expected to shift vegetation habitat distributions over the next century. For the sub-alpine species whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), warming temperatures may indirectly result in loss of suitable bioclimatic habitat, reducing its distribution within its historic range. This research focuses on understanding the patterns of spatiotemporal variability for future projected P.albicaulis suitable habitat in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) through a bioclimatic envelope approach. Since intermodel variability from General Circulation Models (GCMs) lead to differing predictions...
Abstract (from http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10584-016-1608-2): Many recent changes in tree species distributions, mortality, and growth rates have been linked to changes in climate. Managing forests in the face of climate change will require a basic understanding of which tree species will be most vulnerable to climate change and in what ways they will be vulnerable. We assessed the relative vulnerability to climate change of 11 tree species in western North America using a multivariate approach to quantify elements of sensitivity to climate change, exposure to climate change, and the capacity to adapt to climate change. Our assessment was based on a combination of expert knowledge, published studies,...
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These data were compiled in support of the 'Predicting the next high-impact insect invasion: Elucidating traits and factors determining the risk of introduced herbivorous insects on North American native plants' project, supported by the U.S. Geological Survey John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis. The project working group compiled data for non-native insects herbivorous on three or fewer North American conifer families. Data were synthesized from existing resources for a variety of insect traits, traits of their North American conifer host trees, divergence time between the North American host trees and the host tree in the insects' native range, and native insects that feed on the same North American...
Patterns of nitrogen (N) accumulation and turnover in riparian systems in semi-arid regions are poorly understood, particularly in those ecosystems that lack substantial inputs from nitrogen fixing vegetation. We investigated sources and fluxes of N in chronosequences of riparian forests along the regulated Green River and the free-flowing Yampa River in semi-arid northwestern Colorado. Both rivers lack significant inputs from N-fixing vegetation. Total soil nitrogen increased through time along both rivers, at a rate of about 7.8 g N m(-2) year(-1) for years 10-70, and 2.7 g N m(-2)year(-1) from years 70-170. We found that the concentration of N in freshly deposited sediments could account for most of the soil...
Abstract (from http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0099604): Across the globe, species distributions are changing in response to climate change and land use change. In parts of the southeastern United States, climate change is expected to result in the poleward range expansion of black mangroves ( Avicennia germinans) at the expense of some salt marsh vegetation. The morphology of A. germinans at its northern range limit is more shrub-like than in tropical climes in part due to the aboveground structural damage and vigorous multi-stem regrowth triggered by extreme winter temperatures. In this study, we developed aboveground allometric equations for freeze-affected black mangroves which...
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These products were developed to provide scientific and correspondingly spatially explicit information regarding the distribution and abundance of conifers (namely, singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), and western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis)) in Nevada and portions of northeastern California. Encroachment of these trees into sagebrush ecosystems of the Great Basin can present a threat to populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). These data provide land managers and other interested parties with a high-resolution representation of conifers across the range of sage-grouse habitat in Nevada and northeastern California that can be used for a variety of...
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This raster dataset depicts percent canopy cover derived from 1-m conifer classifications when aggregated to 30-m cells. Conifer features were classified from 2010, 2012, and 2013 NAIP Digital Ortho Quarter Quads (DOQQ) using the Feature Analyst 5.0 extension for ArcGIS 10.1. Tiles were organized and grouped by Nevada Department of Wildlife Bi-State Population Management Unit (PMU) locations, plus a 10 km area beyond the PMU extent. Analysts visually identified conifers in the imagery using false color infrared settings and digitized multiple trees per tile as training locations for classification. After performing hierarchical learning and clutter removal with Feature Analyst to remove non-conifer features on...
Abstract (from http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10980-015-0217-1): Context Tree species distribution and abundance are affected by forces operating across a hierarchy of ecological scales. Process and species distribution models have been developed emphasizing forces at different scales. Understanding model agreement across hierarchical scales provides perspective on prediction uncertainty and ultimately enables policy makers and managers to make better decisions. Objective Our objective was to test the hypothesis that agreement between process and species distribution models varies by hierarchical level. Due to the top-down approach of species distribution models and the bottom-up approach of process...
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These products were developed to provide scientific and correspondingly spatially explicit information regarding the distribution and abundance of conifers (namely, singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma), and western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis)) in Nevada and portions of northeastern California. Encroachment of these trees into sagebrush ecosystems of the Great Basin can present a threat to populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). These data provide land managers and other interested parties with a high-resolution representation of conifers within the geographic range of the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment of greater sage-grouse that can be used...
Global climatic change is expected to affect growth and survival of trees and will likely change the geographical distribution of many temperate and boreal tree species. Models that calculate the effects of environmental factors, as well as biotic factors, such as intra- and interspecific competition, on growth and survival of trees have been widely used to calculate the potential effects of temperature changes on tree populations. The methods to calculate thermal effects in such models are described and analyzed for the soundness and consistency of underlying assumptions. They are compared to the evidence from studies of tree physiology, growth, and biogeography. The use of thermal indices, especially temperature...
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These are terrestrial laser scanner datasets collected in forested areas west of Flagstaff, Arizona in 2015 and 2016. For each of the two scanners, six treatment areas were scanned, with four of them overlapping one another (Figure 1). These data are composed of individual scans referenced to one another using reflective targets, and geolocated using differentially corrected GPS and RTK locations of scan locations (Figure 3). There were overall large differences in point density among the two scanners (Figure 2).
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These data were compiled to help understand how climate change may impact dryland pinyon-juniper ecosystems in coming decades, and how resource management might be able to minimize those impacts. Objective(s) of our study were to model the demographic rates of PJ woodlands to estimate the areas that may decline in the future vs. those that will be stable. We quantified populations growth rates across broad geographic areas, and identified the relative roles of recruitment and mortality in driving potential future changes in population viability in 5 tree species that are major components of these dry forests. We used this demographic model to project pinyon-juniper population stability under future climate conditions,...
Categories: Data; Tags: Arizona, Botany, California, Colorado, Ecology, All tags...
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Disturbance disrupts the balance between gross primary productivity and respiration, resulting in a net C loss for some time after a stand-replacing fire. However, our understanding of this process is based on a limited number of studies. Ecosystem C recovery post-fire must be explicitly and carefully examined in order to generate accurate predictions of C cycle impacts of future wildfires and change in fire regimes. Montane ponderosa and lodgepole pine forests, either single-species stands or mixed, dominate surface area in the Southern Rockies. These species have drastically different relationships with wildfire; the current narrative portrays ponderosa pine as accustomed to low-severity surface fires with low...
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This raster dataset depicts percent canopy cover derived from 1-m conifer classifications. Conifer features were classified from 2010, 2012, and 2013 NAIP Digital Ortho Quarter Quads (DOQQ) using the Feature Analyst 5.0 extension for ArcGIS 10.1. Tiles were organized and grouped by Nevada Department of Wildlife Population Management Unit (PMU) locations, plus a 10 km area beyond the PMU extent. Analysts visually identified conifers in the imagery using false color infrared settings and digitized multiple trees per tile as training locations for classification. After performing hierarchical learning and clutter removal with Feature Analyst to remove non-conifer features on output shapefiles, the conifer polygons...
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Fire in the western U.S. poses one of the greatest threats to human and ecological communities alike. In fact, fire management is the largest single expenditure of land management funds on federal lands. Now, climate change is altering wildfire patterns. Climate change in the West is creating warmer and drier conditions, resulting in an increase in the amount of dead vegetation available to fuel fires. This project sought to assess the vulnerability of forests in the southwestern U.S. to climate change and wildfire, in order to understand how these ecosystems might become altered as a result. Researchers (a) examined how climate change impacts wildfires in the region, to better understand fire risk; (b) identified...
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Nevada and northeastern California conifer features were classified from 2010, 2012, and 2013 NAIP Digital Ortho Quarter Quads (DOQQs) using the Feature Analyst 5.0 extension for ArcGIS 10.1. DOQQs were organized and grouped by Nevada Department of Wildlife Bi-State Population Management Unit (PMU) locations, plus a 10 km area beyond the PMU extent. The polygons in this file represent dissolved boundaries of NAIP DOQQ polygons that were associated with the nearest PMU that they intersected. Many DOQQs had to be assigned to a PMU manually because they occurred beyond the original PMU boundary or fell along the boundary between two or more PMUs. Analysts visually identified conifers in the imagery using false color...


map background search result map search result map Why won't they come? Stakeholder perspectives on collaborative national forest planning by participation level. The Vulnerability of Forests to Climate Change and Wildfire in the Southwestern U.S. Geospatial Data for Object-Based High-Resolution Classification of Conifers within Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat across Nevada and a Portion of Northeastern California (ver. 2.0, July 2018) Percent canopy cover of conifers within Nevada and northeastern California sage-grouse habitat (2017) Canopy cover classes of conifers within Nevada and northeastern California sage-grouse habitat, by quadrant (2017) Geospatial data for object-based high-resolution classification of conifers within the geographic range of the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment of greater sage-grouse in California and Nevada Percent canopy cover of conifers within the Bi-State Area of Nevada and California sage-grouse habitat (2017) High-resolution conifer classification by Population Management Unit (PMU), Bi-State (2017) Colorado Landcarbon: Accounting for Wildfire Northern Arizona Ponderosa Pine Forest Treatment Terrestrial Lidar Data Traits and Factors Catalog (TRAFAC): Conifer specialists of North America Pinyon-juniper basal area, climate and demographics data from National Forest Inventory plots and projected under future density and climate conditions Northern Arizona Ponderosa Pine Forest Treatment Terrestrial Lidar Data Colorado Landcarbon: Accounting for Wildfire Why won't they come? Stakeholder perspectives on collaborative national forest planning by participation level. Geospatial data for object-based high-resolution classification of conifers within the geographic range of the Bi-State Distinct Population Segment of greater sage-grouse in California and Nevada Percent canopy cover of conifers within the Bi-State Area of Nevada and California sage-grouse habitat (2017) High-resolution conifer classification by Population Management Unit (PMU), Bi-State (2017) Geospatial Data for Object-Based High-Resolution Classification of Conifers within Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat across Nevada and a Portion of Northeastern California (ver. 2.0, July 2018) Percent canopy cover of conifers within Nevada and northeastern California sage-grouse habitat (2017) Canopy cover classes of conifers within Nevada and northeastern California sage-grouse habitat, by quadrant (2017) The Vulnerability of Forests to Climate Change and Wildfire in the Southwestern U.S. Pinyon-juniper basal area, climate and demographics data from National Forest Inventory plots and projected under future density and climate conditions Traits and Factors Catalog (TRAFAC): Conifer specialists of North America