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Synopsis: This study analyzed the effects of vegetation change on hydrological fluctuations in the Columbia River basin over the last century using two land cover scenarios. The first scenario was a reconstruction of historical land cover vegetation, c. 1900. The second scenario was more recent land cover as estimated from remote sensing data for 1990. The results show that, hydrologically, the most important vegetation-related change has been a general tendency towards decreased vegetation maturity in the forested areas of the basin. This general trend represents a balance between the effects of logging and fire suppression. In those areas where forest maturity has been reduced as a result of logging, wintertime...
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The growth of temperate forests is typically limited by the availability of nitrogen. Elevated concentrations of nitrate in some Catskill Mountain streams, which are tributary to New York City's water-supply reservoirs west of the Hudson River, indicate that the forests of this region are at the early stages of nitrogen saturation. That is, nitrogen is available in excess of the amount utilized by vegetation and soil microorganisms in the forests. Nitrogen saturation is a concern because the mobile nitrate that moves through soil is accompanied by other nutrients such as the base cations calcium and magnesium that are necessary for forest growth but are present in short supply in some Catskill soils. And, nutrient...
Conclusions:The occurence of bull trout in mid-boreal stream is negatively related to two metrics of industrial activity: percent forest harvesting and road density. Bull trout abundance was positively related to elevation, and negatively related to stream width, slope, and levels of forest harvesting.Thresholds/Learnings:Timber harvest on up to 35% or more of individual subbasins is projected to result in the extripation of bull trout from up to 43% of stream reaches, especially those that support high densities of bull trout.
Conclusions:Forest harvesting impacts stream water chemistry by: increasing geological weathering rates due to exposing land surfaces to greater temperature, decreasing acidity of runoff, decreasing organic matter and litter inputs to streams, increasing anion exchange capacity of a soil by lowering pH, etc.Thresholds/Learnings:
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Conclusions: In response to logging, songbirds demonstrated “habitat compensation” by moving into different adjacent habitats across a fragmented landscape. Thresholds/Learnings: Synopsis: This study investigates the degree to which species respond differently to logging across different scales in Alberta’s boreal mixed-wood forests. Researchers tracked changes in the composition and abundance of songbirds at the patch-level and landscape level, finding significant variation between the two spatial scales. The results suggest that predictions of organism response based on the island biogeographic model are limited, and that—while responses varied across species—songbirds demonstrated “habitat compensation” by moving...


    map background search result map search result map Fragments are not islands: patch vs landscape perspectives on songbird presence and abundance in a harvested boreal forest. Effects of land cover change on streamflow in the interior Columbia River Basin (USA and Canada). An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Fragments are not islands: patch vs landscape perspectives on songbird presence and abundance in a harvested boreal forest. An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Effects of land cover change on streamflow in the interior Columbia River Basin (USA and Canada).