Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: M1-Mammals (X)

818 results (8ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Pilfering is thought to play a role in the evolution of scatter-hoarding strategies; but is not well understood in larder-hoarding animals. I studied intraspecific pilfering in red squirrels in Kluane, YT, Canada. The purpose of this project was to estimate the natural rate of cache pilferage, and to examine variation in pilfering behaviour. Results from experimental removal of territory owners, suggested that younger squirrels with smaller food caches were more likely to pilfer when given the opportunity. Survival over-winter was dependent on the number of cones cached and pilfering squirrels were less likely to survive. Using a mark-recapture study of marked cones I found that few individuals (14%) did any pilfering...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: M1-Mammals
High-latitude voles and lemmings undergo strong seasonal changes in their behavior and physiology, which may lead to concurrent changes in bone mineral density (BMD). We tested whether the BMD of northern red-backed voles (Myodes rutilus) in Alaska changed seasonally, and if so, whether these changes in their weight-bearing bones were correlated with seasonal changes in photoperiod (a mediator of activity and concentrations of reproductive hormones in high-latitude voles and lemmings), body mass, body length, or a combination of these. We used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure the BMD of the femur and humerus of voles collected in different seasons. BMDs increased dramatically from the start of spring...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: M1-Mammals
Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: A1-Wildlife, M1-Mammals
We assessed habitat preference of a lynx (Lynx canadensis) population through 8 years of a snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) cycle. Seventy-four percent of our southern Yukon study area was approximately 30-year-old regenerating forest resulting from a large wildfire. The study area was not trapped and lynx density was very high compared with other populations in North America. Contrary to our prediction, there was no discernable shift in habitat preference through the hare cycle; however, our habitat types were coarsely mapped and our radiolocations relatively inaccurate. Lynx may have altered their habitat preferences at finer scales (for patches <2 ha). Lynx showed strong preference for regenerating habitats over...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: M1-Mammals


map background search result map search result map Molecular Genetic Approaches in Wildlife Management Grizzly bear food plant/habitat suitability model for the Atlin Lake and Taku River watersheds (Version 1.0) EFFECTS OF HISTORICAL TIMBER HARVESTING PRACTICES ON CARIBOU FORAGE LICHEN ABUNDANCE NEAR MARSH LAKE, YUKON  -  PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT EFFECTS OF HISTORICAL TIMBER HARVESTING PRACTICES ON CARIBOU FORAGE LICHEN ABUNDANCE NEAR MARSH LAKE, YUKON  -  PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT Molecular Genetic Approaches in Wildlife Management Grizzly bear food plant/habitat suitability model for the Atlin Lake and Taku River watersheds (Version 1.0)