Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Death Valley National Park (X)

261 results (52ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
This polygon shapefile represents estimated flood-inundation areas in Grapevine Canyon near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park. Estimates of the 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.2 percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood streamflows (previously known as the 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500-year floods) were computed from regional flood regression equations. The estimated flood streamflows were used with one-dimensional hydraulic models to compute water surface elevations that were mapped on a digital terrain model of the study area. Those locations where the water surface was higher than the land surface were defined as inundated. The inundation polygons are named by AEP flow (4, 2, 1, 0.5, 0.2-percent) and geometry...
thumbnail
This point shapefile represents 38 terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) survey scan locations collected by single-base real-time kinematic (RTK) global navigation satellite system (GNSS) surveys in Grapevine Canyon near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, from July 12-14, 2016. Data were collected by two Topcon GR-3 GNSS receivers at one-second intervals for three minutes for each location.
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. Burro Trail fault on the south side of Trail Canyon. Nopah Formation in the upper plate lies almost horizontally on the almost horizontal thrust fault. The lower plate is Bonanza King Formation. Circa 1960. Figure 116, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-A.
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. Tubular orifices in the fine sediments at Salt Springs near the north side of Borax Camp allow discharge of water to the valley floor. Light areas are accumulations of salts from previous discharges. Circa 1960. Figure 10, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-B.
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California, circular pattern due to collapse of salty mud into a pool of salty water. These structures are common to the flood plain in the vicinity of the salt pools. Photo by J.R. Stacy, circa 1960. Figure 37, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 494-B. Drawing of photo.
thumbnail
Desert holly (Atriplex hymenelytra),the most drought resistant shrub in Death Valley. The ash of the leaves contains 30 to 35 percent of sodium chloride. Death Valley National Park. Inyo County, California. ca. 1960. (Photo by J. R. Stacy)
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. Conglomerate Copper Canyon Formation in Lower Copper Canyon. 1956.
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. Ten miles south of Furnace Creek on the east slope of the Panamint Range. Road crossing Death Valley in the right foreground. October 11, 1900.
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. Sand Springs at the north end of Death Valley. View is to the south. September 11, 1900.
thumbnail
Olivine gabbro boulders weathered from fanglomerate in the Salt Creek Hills to the east of the Panamint Mountains. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938.
thumbnail
Gower Gulch at the north end of the Black Mountains. Borate-bearing fanglomerate partly sheared across steeply tilted borate beds. Basalt flow in playa clays in the distance. Mine portal at left of center. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Panorama in two parts. Photo 48 and 49. (see ttp00049)
thumbnail
Brecciated Ordovician (?) quartzite in basaltic fanglomerate at the north end of Artist Drive Hills near Mushroom Rock. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938.
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. Typical stand of burroweed near the road along Furnace Creek Wash, above Corkscrew Canyon. This shrub grows on the high parts of the gravel fans above the main stands of creosote bush. Burroweed grows in washes between bare surfaces on the fans with desert pavement. Commonly, desert holly grows along the sides of the washes, and burroweed on the bottom. Photo by J.R. Stacy, circa 1960. Figure 18, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 509. Sketch of photo.
thumbnail
Comma-separated values (.csv) file containing data related to mercury concentrations in dragonfly samples from U.S. National Parks collected as part of the Dragonfly Mercury Project (DMP). First posted - September 14, 2018 Revised - October 18, 2019, ver. 2.0 Revised - February 4, 2020, ver. 3.0 Revised - October 28, 2020, ver. 4.0
Categories: Data; Tags: Acadia National Park, Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, Battle Creek Cypress Swamp, All tags...
thumbnail
Death Valley National Park, California. East at Tule Spring. In the foreground is pickleweed growing on salt-crusted silt; the content of soil salts is about 15 percent. The shrubs in the middle distance are arrowweed; soil salts there are about 10 percent, and the ground water contains only 0.2 percent salts. Behind the arrowweed is mesquite on ground containing less than 1 percent salts. The gravel fans beyond the mesquite have a mixed growth of desert holly and creosote bush, about fifty of each per acre. Hanaupah Canyon and Telescope Peak are in the distance. Photo by J.R. Stacy, circa 1960. Figure 27, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 509. Sketch of photo.


map background search result map search result map Death Valley National Park, California. Conglomerate Copper Canyon Formation in Lower Copper Canyon. 1956. Death Valley National Park, California. Burro Trail fault on the south side of Trail Canyon. Circa 1960. Death Valley National Park, California. Tubular orifices in the fine sediments at Salt Springs near the north side of Borax Camp allow discharge of water to the valley floor.  Circa 1960. Desert holly (Atriplex hymenelytra),the most drought resistant shrub in Death Valley. The ash of the leaves contains 30 to 35 percent of sodium chloride. ca. 1960. Ruins of Harmony Borax Mill. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Casts of bird tracks. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Gower Gulch at the north end of the Black Mountains. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. (Panorama in two parts.) Travertine vein in Funeral Fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Olivine gabbro boulders weathered from fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Brecciated Ordovician (?) quartzite in basaltic fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Death Valley National Park, California. Sand Springs at the north end of Death Valley. View is to the south. September 11, 1900. Death Valley National Park, California. Ten miles south of Furnace Creek on the east slope of the Panamint Range. Total Mercury Concentrations in Dragonfly Larvae from U.S. National Parks Flood-Inundation Areas in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Scan Origins for a Terrestrial Laser Scanner Survey in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Flood-Inundation Areas in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Scan Origins for a Terrestrial Laser Scanner Survey in Grapevine Canyon Near Scotty's Castle, Death Valley National Park, California Death Valley National Park, California. Conglomerate Copper Canyon Formation in Lower Copper Canyon. 1956. Death Valley National Park, California. Burro Trail fault on the south side of Trail Canyon. Circa 1960. Death Valley National Park, California. Tubular orifices in the fine sediments at Salt Springs near the north side of Borax Camp allow discharge of water to the valley floor.  Circa 1960. Desert holly (Atriplex hymenelytra),the most drought resistant shrub in Death Valley. The ash of the leaves contains 30 to 35 percent of sodium chloride. ca. 1960. Ruins of Harmony Borax Mill. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Casts of bird tracks. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Gower Gulch at the north end of the Black Mountains. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. (Panorama in two parts.) Travertine vein in Funeral Fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Olivine gabbro boulders weathered from fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Brecciated Ordovician (?) quartzite in basaltic fanglomerate. Death Valley National Park, California. 1938. Death Valley National Park, California. Sand Springs at the north end of Death Valley. View is to the south. September 11, 1900. Death Valley National Park, California. Ten miles south of Furnace Creek on the east slope of the Panamint Range. Total Mercury Concentrations in Dragonfly Larvae from U.S. National Parks