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These data represent the extent of urbanization (for the year indicated) predicted by the model SLEUTH, developed by Dr. Keith C. Clarke, at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Geography and modified by David I. Donato of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC). Further model modification and implementation was performed at the Biodiversity and Spatial Information Center at North Carolina State University
This report summarizes the results of a three-year investigation of terrestrial habitat connectivity priorities for the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (South Atlantic LCC). Our primary objective was to generate results that could be used to drive fineā€scaled conservation planning to enhance habitat connectivity across the South Atlantic LCC. The project focused on seven target species, including large mammals (black bear, red wolf, Florida panther/eastern cougar) and a group of terrestrial reptiles (eastern diamondback rattlesnake, timber rattlesnake, pine snake, and box turtle). We used two different modeling approaches to identify areas with either high predicted flow of a given species (Circuitscape)...
Managing ecosystems for resilience and sustainability requires understanding how they will respond to future anthropogenic drivers such as climate change and urbanization. In fire-dependent ecosystems, predicting this response requires a focus on how these drivers will impact fire regimes. Here, we use scenarios of climate change, urbanization and management to simulate the future dynamics of the critically endangered and fire-dependent longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem. We investigated how climate change and urbanization will affect the ecosystem, and whether the two conservation goals of a 135% increase in total longleaf area and a doubling of fire-maintained open-canopy habitat can be achieved in the...
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This raster dataset is the result of a subtraction of the classification of raster datasets bhd2030us and bhd2000us. Both are produced using the SERGoM v3 model, they depict housing density for the coterminous US in 2030 and 2000, resp., and are based on 2000 US Census Bureau block (SF1) datasets. (The classication of the subtraction is shown below.) A raster layer that portrays not-developed (and assumed to be undevelopable) called CUS_UPP_100 depicts protected/unprotected lands and Census water polygons. First, Land was removed from blocks (reducing the area of a block, but not its number of housing units -- assuming that private housing units must be on private land) that was public and/or protected in the UNPROTPRIV100...
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Probability of Development, Northeast U.S. is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org). Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit. This index represents the integrated probability of development occurring sometime between 2010 and 2030 at the 30 m cell level. It was based on models of historical patterns of urban growth in the Northeast, including the type (low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity), amount and spatial pattern of development, and incorporates the influence of factors such as geophysical conditions...
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These data represent the extent of urbanization (for the year indicated) predicted by the model SLEUTH, developed by Dr. Keith C. Clarke, at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Geography and modified by David I. Donato of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC). Further model modification and implementation was performed at the Biodiversity and Spatial Information Center at North Carolina State University. More information about these data (along with downloadable ESRI GRID files) can be found at http://www.basic.ncsu.edu/dsl/urb.html
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Probability of Development, Northeast U.S. is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org). Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit. This index represents the integrated probability of development occurring sometime between 2010 and 2080 at the 30 m cell level. It was based on models of historical patterns of urban growth in the Northeast, including the type (low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity), amount and spatial pattern of development, and incorporates the influence of factors such as geophysical conditions...
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20 year Projected Urban Growth scenarios. Base year is 2000. Projected year in this dataset is 2020. Acquired from Cal-Atlas at http://www.atlas.ca.gov/download.html#/casil/society .
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These data represent the extent of urbanization (for the year indicated) predicted by the model SLEUTH, developed by Dr. Keith C. Clarke, at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Geography and modified by David I. Donato of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC). Further model modification and implementation was performed at the Biodiversity and Spatial Information Center at North Carolina State University. More information about these data (along with downloadable ESRI GRID files) can be found at http://www.basic.ncsu.edu/dsl/urb.html
By 2020, most forecasters agree, California will be home to between 43 and 46 million residents-up from 35 million today. Beyond 2020 the size of California's population is less certain. Depending on the composition of the population, and future fertility and migration rates, California's 2050 population could be as little as 50 million or as much as 70 million. One hundred years from now, if present trends continue, California could conceivably have as many as 90 million residents. Where these future residents will live and work is unclear. For most of the 20th Century, two-thirds of Californians have lived south of the Tehachapi Mountains and west of the San Jacinto Mountains-in that part of the state commonly...


map background search result map search result map Projected Urban Growth - SE Region - 7-2013 Projected Urban Growth - SE Region Urban Growth, DRECP California urban growth scenarios, 2020 Probability of Development, 2080, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Probability of Development, 2030, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Urban Growth, DRECP California urban growth scenarios, 2020 Probability of Development, 2080, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Probability of Development, 2030, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Projected Urban Growth - SE Region - 7-2013 Projected Urban Growth - SE Region