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ClimateWNA was used to downscale historical data and future climate projections to a 1-km 2 grid. ClimateWNA is a program that generates both directly calculated and derived climate variables for specific locations across western North America (Wang et al. 2012) using Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM). We generated annual, seasonal and monthly climate data for the period 1961 to 1990. For future climate projections, we used the SRES A2 greenhouse-gas emissions scenario from the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report. We generated five sets of future climate projections averaged for the time period 2070-2099: BCCR BCM2.0, CCCMA CGCM3, CSIRO MK 3.0, INMCM 3.0, MIROC3.2 MEDRES. Downloads:...
Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) has come to dominate millions of hectares of rangeland in the Intermountain western United States. Previous studies have hypothesized that one mechanism conferring a competitive advantage to this species is the ability to germinate rapidly at low temperatures in the fall, winter and spring and, therefore, initiate growth and establishment more rapidly than more desirable perennial bunchgrass species. In this experiment, we developed thermal-germination-response models for multiple seedlots of cheatgrass and five perennial grass species. We conducted sensitivity analysis on potential-cumulative-germination response to a 38-year simulation of field-variable conditions of seedbed temperature...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the GFDL A2 Scenario for Climatic Water Deficit (CWD) in southern Sierra Nevada California, for 2010-2039. The term climatic water deficit defined by Stephenson (1998) is quantified as the amount of water by which potential evapotranspiration (PET) exceeds actual evapotranspiration (AET). This term effectively integrates the combined effects of solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and air temperature on watershed conditions given available soil moisture derived from precipitation. Climatic water deficit can be thought of as the amount of additional water that would have evaporated or transpired had it been present in the soils given the temperature...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the PCM A2 Scenario for annual Climatic Water Deficit (CWD), 2070-2099, clipped to the DRECP 12 km buffered boundary. The term climatic water deficit defined by Stephenson (1998) is quantified as the amount of water by which potential evapotranspiration (PET) exceeds actual evapotranspiration (AET). This term effectively integrates the combined effects of solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and air temperature on watershed conditions given available soil moisture derived from precipitation. Climatic water deficit can be thought of as the amount of additional water that would have evaporated or transpired had it been present in the soils given the...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the PCM A2 Scenario for average Spring (March, April, May) snowpack, in central Sierra Nevada California, for 2040-2069. Snowpack: Amount of snow accumulated per month summed annually, or if divided by 12 average monthly snowpack. This is calculated as prior month's snowpack plus snowfall minus sublimation and snow melt. The California Basin Characterization Model (BCM) climate dataset provides historical and projected climate surfaces for the state at a 270 meter resolution. The historical data is based on 4 kilometer PRISM data, and the projected climate surfaces are based on the A2 and B1 scenarios of the PCM and GFDL GCMs. The BCM approach uses...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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Using the simple anomaly method (modifying a historical baseline with differences or ratios projected by General Circulation Models), scientists from the California Academy of Sciences downscaled monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation from 16 different global circulation models (GCMs). The GCMs were described in the latest Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC 2007) and archived at the WCRP PCMDI (http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php). Monthly maximum temperature and monthly minimum temperatures were downscaled from the only 6 GCMs that archived these particular variables. Scientists used Worldclim v.1.4 (Hijmans et al 2005) at 5 arc-minute (~10km) spatial grain as the current...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the PCM A2 Scenario for annual recharge, 2010-2039, clipped to the DRECP 12 km buffered boundary. Recharge: Amount of water exceeding field capacity that enters bedrock, occurs at a rate determined by the hydraulic conductivity of the underlying materials, excess water (rejected recharge) is added to runoff. The California Basin Characterization Model (BCM) climate dataset provides historical and projected climate surfaces for the state at a 270 meter resolution. The historical data is based on 4 kilometer PRISM data, and the projected climate surfaces are based on the A2 and B1 scenarios of the PCM and GFDL GCMs. The BCM approach uses a regional...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the PCM A2 Scenario for average Spring (March, April, May) snowpack, 2010-2039, clipped to the DRECP 12 km buffered boundary. Snowpack: Amount of snow accumulated per month summed annually, or if divided by 12 average monthly snowpack. This is calculated as prior month's snowpack plus snowfall minus sublimation and snow melt. The California Basin Characterization Model (BCM) climate dataset provides historical and projected climate surfaces for the state at a 270 meter resolution. The historical data is based on 4 kilometer PRISM data, and the projected climate surfaces are based on the A2 and B1 scenarios of the PCM and GFDL GCMs. The BCM approach...
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This dataset is a historic average Spring (March, April, May) snowpack, for 1971-2000, clipped to the DRECP 12 km buffered boundary from the California Basin Characterization Model (BCM) Snowpack: Amount of snow accumulated per month summed annually, or if divided by 12 average monthly snowpack. This is calculated as prior month's snowpack plus snowfall minus sublimation and snow melt. The California Basin Characterization Model (BCM) climate dataset provides historical and projected climate surfaces for the state at a 270 meter resolution. The historical data is based on 4 kilometer PRISM data, and the projected climate surfaces are based on the A2 and B1 scenarios of the PCM and GFDL GCMs. The BCM approach...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the PCM A2 Scenario for Climatic Water Deficit (CWD) in southern Sierra Nevada California, for 2010-2039. The term climatic water deficit defined by Stephenson (1998) is quantified as the amount of water by which potential evapotranspiration (PET) exceeds actual evapotranspiration (AET). This term effectively integrates the combined effects of solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and air temperature on watershed conditions given available soil moisture derived from precipitation. Climatic water deficit can be thought of as the amount of additional water that would have evaporated or transpired had it been present in the soils given the temperature...
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This dataset is a Basin Characterization Model (BCM) output using the GFDL A2 Scenario for Climatic Water Deficit (CWD) in central Sierra Nevada California, for 2070-2099. The term climatic water deficit defined by Stephenson (1998) is quantified as the amount of water by which potential evapotranspiration (PET) exceeds actual evapotranspiration (AET). This term effectively integrates the combined effects of solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and air temperature on watershed conditions given available soil moisture derived from precipitation. Climatic water deficit can be thought of as the amount of additional water that would have evaporated or transpired had it been present in the soils given the temperature...


map background search result map search result map Western North American Climate Data from the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment PCM A2 Scenario Annual Recharge, DRECP, 2010-2039 GFDL A2 Scenario Climatic Water Deficit, Southern Sierra Nevada California, 2010-2039 PCM A2 Scenario Average Spring Snowpack, DRECP, 2010-2039 Historic Average Spring Snowpack, DRECP,1971-2000 PCM A2 Scenario Climatic Water Deficit, Southern Sierra Nevada California, 2010-2039 PCM A2 Scenario Annual Climatic Water Deficit, DRECP, 2070-2099 PCM A2 Scenario Average Spring Snowpack, Central Sierra Nevada California, 2040-2069 GFDL A2 Scenario Climatic Water Deficit, Central Sierra Nevada California, 2070-2099 Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature maximum (Fall: 2080-2099), under B1 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature minimum (Winter: 2020-2039), under B1 emission scenario Calculated change (mm) in seasonal precipitation average (Winter: 2060-2079), under B1 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature maximum (Summer: 2020-2039), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature maximum (Spring: 2080-2099), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature average (Summer: 2020-2039), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change in seasonal precipitation average (Summer: 2080-2099), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change (mm) in seasonal precipitation average (Spring: 2060-2079), under A2 emission scenario PCM A2 Scenario Average Spring Snowpack, Central Sierra Nevada California, 2040-2069 GFDL A2 Scenario Climatic Water Deficit, Central Sierra Nevada California, 2070-2099 GFDL A2 Scenario Climatic Water Deficit, Southern Sierra Nevada California, 2010-2039 PCM A2 Scenario Climatic Water Deficit, Southern Sierra Nevada California, 2010-2039 PCM A2 Scenario Annual Climatic Water Deficit, DRECP, 2070-2099 PCM A2 Scenario Annual Recharge, DRECP, 2010-2039 PCM A2 Scenario Average Spring Snowpack, DRECP, 2010-2039 Historic Average Spring Snowpack, DRECP,1971-2000 Western North American Climate Data from the Pacific Northwest Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Calculated change (mm) in seasonal precipitation average (Winter: 2060-2079), under B1 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature average (Summer: 2020-2039), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change in seasonal precipitation average (Summer: 2080-2099), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change (mm) in seasonal precipitation average (Spring: 2060-2079), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature maximum (Fall: 2080-2099), under B1 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature minimum (Winter: 2020-2039), under B1 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature maximum (Summer: 2020-2039), under A2 emission scenario Calculated change (Celsius) in seasonal temperature maximum (Spring: 2080-2099), under A2 emission scenario