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These data were compiled to fit an integrated population model of brown trout in the Glen Canyon Reach of the Colorado River and test different hypotheses regarding the driver of brown trout population dynamics. Also, data were compiled as inputs for a model to simulate population dynamics and species interactions among brown trout, rainbow trout and humpback chub in the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and the confluence of the Colorado River and the Little Colorado River.
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In recent decades the encroachment of woody mangrove species into herbaceous marshes has been documented along the U.S. northern Gulf of Mexico coast. These species shifts have been attributed primarily to rising sea levels and warming winter temperatures, but the role of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water availability may become more prominent drivers of species interactions under future climate conditions. In this greenhouse study we examined the effects of CO2 concentration (ambient, elevated) and water regime (drought, saturated, flooded) on early growth of the mangrove species Avicennia germinans and Spartina alterniflora, a herbaceous grass.
Abstract (from http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1732/1366.long): Altered species interactions are difficult to predict and yet may drive the response of ecological communities to climate change. We show that declining snowpack strengthens the impacts of a generalist herbivore, elk ( Cervus elaphus), on a common tree species. Thick snowpack substantially reduces elk visitation to sites; aspen ( Populus tremuloides) shoots in these areas experience lower browsing rates, higher survival and enhanced recruitment. Aspen inside herbivore exclosures have greatly increased recruitment, particularly at sites with thick snowpack. We suggest that long-term decreases in snowpack could help explain a widespread...
Abstract (from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534715000075): Extrinsic factors influencing evolutionary processes are often categorically lumped into interactions that are environmentally (e.g., climate, landscape) or community-driven, with little consideration of the overlap or influence of one on the other. However, genomic variation is strongly influenced by complex and dynamic interactions between environmental and community effects. Failure to consider both effects on evolutionary dynamics simultaneously can lead to incomplete, spurious, or erroneous conclusions about the mechanisms driving genomic variation. We highlight the need for a landscape community genomics (LCG) framework to...


    map background search result map search result map Early growth interactions between a mangrove and an herbaceous salt marsh species are not affected by elevated CO2 or drought, Louisiana saltmarsh, 2015 Population dynamics of humpback chub, rainbow trout and brown trout in the Colorado River in its Grand Canyon Reach: modelling code and input data Early growth interactions between a mangrove and an herbaceous salt marsh species are not affected by elevated CO2 or drought, Louisiana saltmarsh, 2015 Population dynamics of humpback chub, rainbow trout and brown trout in the Colorado River in its Grand Canyon Reach: modelling code and input data