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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...
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The British Columbia Marine Conservation Analysis (BCMCA) is a collaborative project assembling and analyzing spatial information about Canada's Pacific Ocean. The overall goal of the BCMCA is to identify marine areas of high conservation value and marine areas important to human use. Results of the project are intended to inform and help advance marine planning initiatives in BC by providing collaborative, peer-reviewed scientific analyses based on the best ecological and human use spatial data at scales relevant to a BC coast-wide analysis.
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Species occurrence data were obtained from the Atlas of Spawning and Nursery Areas of Great Lakes Fishes (Goodyear et al. 1982). The atlas contains information on all of the commercially and recreationally important species that use the tributaries, littoral and open-water areas of the Great Lakes as spawning and nursery habitats. Close to 9500 geo-referenced data records (occurrences of fish species) were imported into ArcView GIS. The 139 fish taxa reported in the Atlas had to be grouped into fewer broad categories to produce meaningful distribution maps. We chose three functional classification schemes. Jude and Pappas (1992) used Correspondence Analysis to partition fish species associated with the open...


map background search result map search result map BCMCA_ECO_Fish_HerringSpawn_DATA Lake Michigan, USA: Historic white sucker spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic walleye spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic sturgeon spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic smallmouth bass spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic round whitefish spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic rainbow trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic rainbow smelt spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic northern pike spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic lake whitefish spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic lake trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic herring spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic coho spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic burbot spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic brown trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic brook trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic bowfin spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic bloater spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic alewife spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic bowfin spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic brook trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic bloater spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic round whitefish spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic northern pike spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic smallmouth bass spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic walleye spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic sturgeon spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic herring spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic burbot spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic lake trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic lake whitefish spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic alewife spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic white sucker spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic rainbow trout spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic rainbow smelt spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic coho spawning locations Lake Michigan, USA: Historic brown trout spawning locations BCMCA_ECO_Fish_HerringSpawn_DATA