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Water use and carbon acquisition were examined in a northern Utah population of Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little. Leaf-level carbon assimilation, which was greatest in the spring and autumn, was limited by soil water availability. Gas exchange, plant water potential and tissue hydrogen stable isotopic ratio (deltaD) data suggested that plants responded rapidly to summer rain events. Based on a leaf area index of 1.4, leaf-level water use and carbon acquisition scaled to canopy-level means of 0.59 mm day(-1) and 0.13 mol m(-2) ground surface day(-1), respectively. Patterns of soil water potential indicated that J. osteosperma dries the soil from the surface downward to a depth of about 1 m. Hydraulic redistribution...
In the sagebrush/bunchgrass steppe of the North American Great Basin soil water potential has been shown to exhibit diel fluctuations with water potential increasing during the night as a result of water loss from roots in relatively dry soil layers. We hypothesized that environmental conditions promoting low transpiration rates (shading, cloudiness) would cause a net increase in soil water potential as a result of reduced soil water depletion during the day and continuing water efflux from roots during the night. We examined the response of soil water potential to artificial shading in sagebrush/bunchgrass plantings and used a simple model to predict how soil water potential should respond to reduced transpiration....
Diel soil water potential fluctuations reflected daytime depletion and nocturnal resupply of water in upper soil layers. Transpiration suppression experiments demonstrated that water absorption by roots caused the daytime depletion. The soil water potential data and experimental results suggest that at night water absorbed from moist soil by deeper roots is transported to and lost from roots into drier upper soil layers. The deeper roots appear to absorb and transport water both day and night. Implications for the efficiency of deep roots and water storage, nutrient uptake and water parasitism in upper soil layers are discussed. Published in Oecologia, volume 73, issue 4, on pages 486 - 489, in 1987.
Roots influence root litter decomposition through multiple belowground processes. Hydraulic lift or redistribution (HR) by plants is one such process that creates diel drying?rewetting cycles in soil. However, it is unclear if this phenomenon influences decomposition. Since decomposition in deserts is constrained by low soil moisture and is stimulated when dry soils are rewetted, we hypothesized that diel drying?rewetting, via HR, stimulates decomposition of root litter. We quantified the decomposition of root litter from two desert shrubs, Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata and Sarcobatus vermiculatus, during spring and summer in field soil core treatments designed to have abundant roots and high magnitude HR...
Although metabolic activity of soil organisms is determined by water accessibility, little attention was given to rewetting with different water potentials. Rapid water potential increase induced a respiration pulse in organic layers in laboratory experiments and significant effects could be observed when soil below −6300 hPa was rewetted. Published in Soil Biology and Biochemistry, volume 41, issue 7, on pages 1577 - 1579, in 2009.
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These data are daily climate, water balance, and soil moisture data for 300 plots in the National Park Service (NPS) Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN) Inventory & Monitoring (I&M) network. Climate data was collected from a gridded, daily climate dataset, Daymet (https://daymet.ornl.gov/). Climate, alongside field-collected soils (SoilDepthsByPlot.csv) and vegetation information, were then used to drive a point based, daily, multi soil-layer, ecosystem water-balance model, SOILWAT2 (https://github.com/DrylandEcology/SOILWAT2). SCPN plots were established to capture the range of ecosystem conditions present in this network. Plant communities of the SCPN are a vital sign for this region, enhancing habitat, stabilizing...
Tags: Arizona, Aztec Ruins National Monument, Bandelier National Monument, Chaco Culture National Monument, Climatology, All tags...
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These data were simulated using the SOILWAT model and were intended to characterize soil-water conditions at different ecological sites on the Southern Colorado Plateau. SOILWAT is a daily, site-specific, multi soil-layer, ecosystem water-balance model, driven by daily meteorology, as well as site soil texture and vegetation. The sites simulated correspond with Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) plots established by the National Park Service’s (NPS) Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN), which were established to capture the range of ecosystem conditions present in this network. Plant communities of the Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN) are a vital sign for this region, enhancing habitat, stabilizing soils,...


    map background search result map search result map The influence of shade and clouds on soil water potential: The buffered behavior of hydraulic lift Carbon acquisition and water use in a Northern Utah Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper) population. Simulated Soil Water Potential in National Parks and Monuments of the Southern Colorado Plateau, 1915-2099—Data Daily Climate and Soil Moisture Data for the Southern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 1980 - 2018 Simulated Soil Water Potential in National Parks and Monuments of the Southern Colorado Plateau, 1915-2099—Data Daily Climate and Soil Moisture Data for the Southern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 1980 - 2018