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These data depict reptile species richness within the range of the Greater Sage-grouse. Species boundaries were defined as the total extent of a species geographic limits. This raster largely used species range data from "U.S. Geological Survey - Gap Analysis Project Species Range Maps CONUS_2001", however in order for a more complete picture of species richness, additional sources were used for species missing from the Gap Analysis program.
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Data were collected in association with locations of standard brown treesnake traps on Guam at location prior to suppression or control efforts and after control had occurred. In all cases study sites were closed or semi-closed populations of brown treesnakes. Habitat data focused on type and structure of the habitat within 10-m of the trap.
Snake fungal disease (SFD) represents a conservation threat to wild snake populations. The disease was reported in North America early in the 21st century, but the history of SFD has not been investigated. We examined museum specimens and confirmed cases of SFD based on clinical signs, histopathologic lesions, and detection of the causative agent Ophidiomyces ophidiicola. The first confirmed cases of SFD in these specimens was >50 years prior to the disease’s reported emergence.
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Number of snake and lizard species, by terrestrial ecoregion. We compiled data on terrestrial lizards and snakes by querying the WWF WildFinder database for species occurrences by ecoregion of the following taxonomic groups: Sauria, Serpentes, Amphisbaenia, and Rhynchocephalia. The WWF WildFinder database is a spatially explicit online database of vertebrate species occurrences by ecoregion. These data were displayed in a map published in The Atlas of Global Conservation (Hoekstra et al., University of California Press, 2010). More information at http://nature.org/atlas.
Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging disease of wild snakes in eastern North America caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. The data presented here describe: 1) the types of fungi recovered in culture from the skin of snakes with and without fungal skin infections, 2) the presence or absence of skin lesions in populations of snakes surveyed at several sites in Wisconsin and Minnesota, and 3) the various species of snakes that have been found to harbor O. ophiodiicola.
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Comprehensive list of carcasses detected at Haul Trail in Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge (Orleans Parish, LA) and relevant findings for specimens subject to postmortem examination at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (Madison, WI).
This study demonstratest he correlationo f an arrayo f ecological characteristicsw ith foraging mode in sit-and-wait foraging Crotalus cerastes and widely foraging Masticophis flagellum. Crotalus cerastes are chiefly nocturnal and spend most of their time on the surface either coiled on or partially buried in the sand waiting to ambush prey. Masticophis flagellum are strictly diurnal predators and cruise through the habitat searching for active and sedentary prey. In this study, C. cerastes averaged 7.2 ? 0.7 (SE) h/day on the surface, almost twice the time of M. flagellum (3.9 ? 0.9 h/day). Body temperatures (Tb's) of active M. flagellum, determined from surgically implanted radio transmitters, were significantly...
Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging disease of wild snakes in eastern North America caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Recently, the disease has also been detected in wild snake in Europe. The data presented here describe: 1) culture, PCR, and histopathology results of wild European snakes opportunistically sampled for O. ophiodiicola, 2) colony expansion rates of various isolates of O. ophiodiicola from Europe and North America, and 3) DNA sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree files.
This community catalog serves the Oregon Water Science Center. Community public website: http://or.water.usgs.gov/. The Oregon Water Science Center provides reliable water data and interpretation of data to Federal, State, and local agencies, Tribes, and the public. Our data and study results are widely used to manage Oregon's water resources for the benefit of people and our environment.
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Animals move to locate important resources such as food, water, and mates. Therefore, movement patterns can reflect temporal and spatial availability of resources as well as when, where, and how individuals access such resources. To test these relationships for a predatory reptile, we quantified the effects of prey abundance on the spatial ecology of invasive brown treesnakes (Boiga irregularis). After toxicant-mediated suppression of a brown treesnake population on Guam, we simultaneously used visual encounter surveys to estimate rodent abundance and radiotelemetry to document movement behavior of surviving snakes located in the Habitat Management Unit (HMU) in Northern Guam, Andersen Air Force Base. The impact...


    map background search result map search result map Number of Lizard and Snake Species by Terrestrial Ecoregion Snake fungal disease: an emerging threat to wild snakes Emerging fungal pathogen Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in wild European snakes: data Habitat characterization around standard brown treesnake traps on Guam, 2004 - 2017 Reptile Richness in the Range of the Sage-grouse, Derived From Species Range Maps Bayou Sauvage NWR (LA) Haul Trail Snake Mortality, 2015-2017 Confirmed cases of snake fungal disease in historical museum specimens Brown treesnake movement following snake suppression in the Habitat Management Unit on Northern Guam from 2015 Bayou Sauvage NWR (LA) Haul Trail Snake Mortality, 2015-2017 Brown treesnake movement following snake suppression in the Habitat Management Unit on Northern Guam from 2015 Habitat characterization around standard brown treesnake traps on Guam, 2004 - 2017 Reptile Richness in the Range of the Sage-grouse, Derived From Species Range Maps Emerging fungal pathogen Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in wild European snakes: data Snake fungal disease: an emerging threat to wild snakes Confirmed cases of snake fungal disease in historical museum specimens Number of Lizard and Snake Species by Terrestrial Ecoregion