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The research was conducted at eight tidal marshes in coastal estuaries spanning the Washington and Oregon coastlines from Padilla Bay in northern Washington to Bandon located at the mouth of the Coquille River in southern Oregon. The researchers performed bathymetric surveys, created digital elevation models, measured historic rates of mineral and organic matter accumulation, conducted vegetation surveys, deployed water level data loggers, and produced WARMER wetland accretion model projections for each study site. This collection contains data for all of the above across a number of different datasets. Users should investigate the metadata for each item for more information about it's purpose, methods, quality,...
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County- wide DEMs at 5m resolution were provided by TNRIS and mosaicked clipped to the study area. This DEM was then used to develop 1- and 2- meter contours to assist in evaluating potential sea level rise scenarios in areas not covered by the SLAMM model run. A low-pass filter was first applied to the DEM to remove any major outliers within the elevation raster. The DEM was then reclassified according to elevation, separating the DEM into 4 classes: minimum elevation up to 0 m, between 0 m and 1m, between 1 m and 2m, and above 2 m. This reclassified raster was then converted to a polygon feature class. Polygons representing 0-1 m and 1 – 2 m were then exported separately, and these were used as 1 and 2 meter elevation...
This project evaluates the effects of global climate change and sea level rise on estuarine intertidal habitat in the San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Flyway migratory waterbirds that rely on this habitat. Phase 2 of this project is a continuation of work to evaluate the effects of global climate change and sea level rise (SLR) on intertidal shoals in the San Francisco Bay Estuary and the migratory waterbirds that rely on this critically important resource in the Pacific Flyway. The primary objectives are to: 1) use downscaled global climate change models to translate SLR and climate scenarios into habitat quantity predictions through Delft3D and Dflow-FM (unstructured grid) geomorphic modeling; 2) model the response...
Coastal ecosystems in the Eastern U.S. have been severely altered by processes associated with human development, including drainage of wetlands, changes in hydrology, land clearing, agricultural and forestry activity, and the construction of structures that “harden” the coast. Sea-level rise and the changing frequency of extreme events associated with climate change are now further degrading the capacity of those ecological and social systems to remain resilient. As custodians of ecological goods and services valued by society, coastal National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) have a particularly important role to play in helping socio-ecological systems adapt to global-change processes. To help refuges address this challenge,...
The main goal of this project is to ensure that the 2011-13 climate change update to the Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Report (Baylands Goals) and other key, ongoing conservation activities in the San Francisco Bay region use the latest information about the current and future status of San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems, particularly in the context of sea-level rise. The main product of the project is the improved Sea Level Rise (SLR) Tool, specifically upgraded to inform the Baylands Goals Report update. The tool will continue to be available online at www.prbo.org/sfbayslr. All data layers going into the tool are and will continue to be downloadable from the site.
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The overarching goal of this research was to use site-specific data to develop local and regionally-applicable climate change models that inform management of tidal wetlands along the Pacific Northwest coast. The overarching questions were: (1) how do tidal marsh site characteristics vary across estuaries, and (2) does tidal marsh susceptibility to sea-level rise (SLR) vary along a latitudinal gradient and between estuaries? These questions are addressed in this data collection with three specific objectives: (1) measure topographical and ecological characteristics (e.g., elevation, tidal range, vegetation composition) for tidal marsh and intertidal mudflats, (2) model SLR vulnerability of these habitats, and (3)...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, Bolinas Lagoon, CA, CASC, California, All tags...
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In California, the near-shore area where the ocean meets the land is a highly productive yet sensitive region that supports a wealth of wildlife, including several native bird species. These saltmarshes, mudflats, and shallow bays are not only critical for wildlife, but they also provide economic and recreational benefits to local communities. Today, sea-level rise, more frequent and stronger storms, saltwater intrusion, and warming water temperatures are among the threats that are altering these important habitats. To support future planning and conservation of California’s near-shore habitats, researchers examined current weather patterns, elevations, tides, and sediments at these sites to see how they affect...
Categories: Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, Bolinas Lagoon, CA, CASC, California, All tags...
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County- wide DEMs at 5m resolution were provided by TNRIS and mosaicked clipped to the study area. This DEM was then used to develop 1- and 2- meter contours to assist in evaluating potential sea level rise scenarios in areas not covered by the SLAMM model run. A low-pass filter was first applied to the DEM to remove any major outliers within the elevation raster. The DEM was then reclassified according to elevation, separating the DEM into 4 classes: minimum elevation up to 0 m, between 0 m and 1m, between 1 m and 2m, and above 2 m. This reclassified raster was then converted to a polygon feature class. Polygons representing 0-1 m and 1 – 2 m were then exported separately, and these were used as 1 and 2 meter elevation...
The understanding of sea-level rise (SLR) processes has improved significantly over the past 15-20 years. Contributions from ice sheets and ocean dynamics are increasingly well-understood, and global budgets better constrained. In addition to physically-based models, semi-empirical methods, and more recently expert elicitations, are also available to describe potential SLR. In spite of these advances, there is still large uncertainty in the magnitude and timing of SLR over the next century and beyond. How much and how fast sea-level may rise can be a significant determinant of management actions in both natural and built environments. Assessing the potential vulnerability of the coastal zone to SLR requires integrating...
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Changes in tidal marsh area and habitat type in response to sea-level rise were modeled using the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) that accounts for the dominant processes involved in wetland conversion and shoreline modifications during long-term sea level rise (Park et al. 1989; Successive versions of the model have been used to estimate the impacts of sea level rise on the coasts of the U.S. The model was produced by Warren Pinnacle Consulting, Inc. for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The SLAMM version 6 technical document can be accessed at http://warrenpinacle.com/prof/SLAMM. SLAMM outputs were converted from raster to vector features. Land cover (wetland) types were generalized to MesoHabitat...
To be successful, natural resource managers need to synthesize diverse information on the effects of management actions, climate change and other stressors on wildlife populations at appropriate scales. The project team developed a Decision Support Tool (DST) that integrates the results of multi-disciplinary, multi-taxa modeling allowing users to project outcomes of conservation actions, accounting for effects of climate change and other stressors. This DST builds on work to improve a sea level rise tool for adaptive tidal wetland restoration and management. The DST provides information on how restoration can increase population resilience and long-term persistence at multiple scales for multiple species throughout...
Submersed aquatic vegetation, a critical component of highly productive coastal ecosystems, is greatly affected by sea level rise. The Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative needs consistent information on these natural resources along the Gulf of Mexico Coast to develop computer modeling tools. These tools will contribute to efforts to forecast the effects of climate change on the distribution, abundance, and diversity of submersed aquatic vegetation and the fish and wildlife that depend on them. This project was co-funded by the Gulf Coast Prairie and the Gulf Coastal Plains and Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. An alternate reference...
Assessing the potential vulnerability of the coastal zone to sea-level rise (SLR) requires integrating a variety of physical, biological, and social factors. These include landscape, habitat, and resource changes, as well as the ability of society and its institutions to adapt. The range of physical and biological responses associated with SLR is poorly understood at some of the critical time and space scales required for decision making. Limitations in the ability to quantitatively predict outcomes at local, regional, and national scales affect whether, when, and how some decisions will be made. The USGS and collaborators are developing scientific knowledge and tools to understand and anticipate the magnitude and...


    map background search result map search result map Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Extreme Storms on California Coastal Habitats: Part 1 0 - 1m Elevation Contour for the Central Texas Coast 1 - 2m Elevation Contour for the Central Texas Coast Whooping Crane - Potential Habitat Under Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) Conditions Sea-level rise projections for and observational data of tidal marshes along the California coast Field and model data for studying the effects of sea-level rise on eight tidal marshes in coastal Washington and Oregon 0 - 1m Elevation Contour for the Central Texas Coast 1 - 2m Elevation Contour for the Central Texas Coast Whooping Crane - Potential Habitat Under Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) Conditions Field and model data for studying the effects of sea-level rise on eight tidal marshes in coastal Washington and Oregon Sea-level rise projections for and observational data of tidal marshes along the California coast Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Extreme Storms on California Coastal Habitats: Part 1