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The release of the saltcedar beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) has resulted in the periodic defoliation of tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) along more than 1000 river km in the upper Colorado River Basin and is expected to spread along many other river reaches throughout the upper basin, and possibly into the lower Colorado River Basin. Identifying the impacts of these release programs on tamarisk water use and subsequent water cycling in arid riparian systems are largely unknown, due in part to the difficulty of measuring water fluxes in these systems. We used lab-calibrated, modified heat-dissipation sap flux sensors to monitor tamarisk water use (n = 20 trees) before, during and after defoliation by the saltcedar leaf beetle...
Early succession aspen and late succession conifer forests have different architecture and physiology affecting hydrologic transfer processes. An evaluation of water pools and fluxes was used to determine differences in the hydrologic dynamics between stands of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and associated stands of mixed conifer consisting of white fir (Abies concolor), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii). In 2005 and 2006, measurements of snow water accumulation, snow ablation (melt), soil water content, snowpack sublimation, and evapotranspiration (ET) were measured in adjacent aspen and conifer stands. Peak snow water equivalent (SWE) averaged 34–44% higher in...
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Anthropogenic climate change is likely to alter the patterns of moisture availability globally. The consequences of these changes on species distributions and ecosystem function are largely unknown, but possibly predictable based on key ecophysiological differences among currently coexisting species. In this study, we examined the environmental and biological controls on transpiration from a piñon–juniper (Pinus edulis–Juniperus osteosperma) woodland in southern Utah, USA. The potential for climate-change-associated shifts in moisture inputs could play a critical role in influencing the relative vulnerabilities of piñons and junipers to drought and affecting management decisions regarding the persistence of this...
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This data release contains a zipped folder with two comma delimited data files and two companion metadata files. The data files are: 1.) sap_flux_data.csv and; 2.) biophysical_characteristics_of_instrumented_trees.csv. The sap flux data were stored in data loggers every 10-minutes for 15 riparian trees. Sap flux was estimated using heat-pulse velocity sensors at three depths into the xylem of each tree. Sap flux estimates in the data release are 30-minute rolling medians which reduces data spikes that are common in high-frequency sap-flux data. The biophysical measurements are properties of the instrumented trees that allow scaling of sap flux to sap flow and total-tree water-use.


    map background search result map search result map Transpiration and Hydraulic Strategies in a Pinyon-Juniper Woodland Sap flux-scaled transpiration by tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) before, during and after episodic defoliation by the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) Sap flux and biophysical measurements of select trees at Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, 2019 Sap flux and biophysical measurements of select trees at Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, 2019 Transpiration and Hydraulic Strategies in a Pinyon-Juniper Woodland Sap flux-scaled transpiration by tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) before, during and after episodic defoliation by the saltcedar leaf beetle (Diorhabda carinulata)