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This report examines the current state of practice for identifying and prioritizing wetlands for their usefulness in climate risk reduction and climate resilience. It is intended to identify promising paths to advance current practice and to improve implementation of strategies across the coastal states of the Mid-Atlantic Region in order to achieve regional protection of human communities and maintenance of ecological functions over the coming century of climate change impacts.
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Tidal marshes serve a variety of important functions valued by Maine communities. Unfortunately, tidal marsh habitats are highly vulnerable to damage or loss from sea level rise. Scientists expect marsh habitats will be more frequently flooded in the future and marsh vegetation lost or significantly altered as a result. Salt marshes do, however, have the ability to ‘migrate’ landward with sea level rise-induced changes in shoreline position. The potential and ability for marsh migration is crucial to sustaining these important ecosystems and their functions for the future.Recognizing this, and with financial support from the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Collaborative (NALCC) and other sources, a team of...
This is the final report of a project primarily funded by a grant from the US Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service and North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (award # F14AC00965). The work was conducted by the collaborative Saltmarsh Habitat and Avian Research Program (SHARP). This report consists of four manuscripts, written for submission to the peer review literature, and dealing with (1) the use of remote sensing to estimate marsh elevation, (2) description of marsh vegetation throughout the northeastern USA, (3) current conservation planning for focal marsh birds, and (4) future projections for marsh area and focal marsh birds....
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Suggested citation: Schrass, K. and A.V. Mehta. 2017. Improved Use and Understanding of NNBF in the Mid-Atlantic. Annapolis, MD: National Wildlife Federation.Executive SummaryThe impacts of climate change are already being felt in the Mid-Atlantic region. Coastal communities and habitats are threatened by sea level rise and an increasing frequency and severity of strong storms. Traditionally, gray infrastructure like seawalls and bulkheads have been used to protect coasts; however, these approaches disrupt intact ecological systems and exacerbate damage along adjacent shorelines. As a result, Natural and Nature-Based Features (NNBF) are increasingly being explored as a means of adapting to climate change while also...
Please cite as: Anderson, M.G. and Barnett, A. 2017. Resilient Coastal Sites for Conservation in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic US. The Nature Conservancy, Eastern Conservation Science.View the interactive map, download the data, and read the report at:https://www.nature.org/resilientcoastsNearly half of all Americans live and work in coastal counties, areas that also provide critical habitat for a diversity of fish and wildlife. However, the capacity for these places to support human and natural communities in the face of rising sea levels varies widely. In response to this threat, scientists from The Nature Conservancy evaluated more than 10,000 coastal sites in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic to determine their...


    map background search result map search result map Integrating Science into Policy: Local Adaptation for Marsh Migration Improved Use of Natural and Nature-Based Features in the Mid-Atlantic Developing Wetland Restoration Priorities for Climate Risk Reduction and Resilience in the MARCO Region Integrating Science into Policy: Local Adaptation for Marsh Migration Improved Use of Natural and Nature-Based Features in the Mid-Atlantic Developing Wetland Restoration Priorities for Climate Risk Reduction and Resilience in the MARCO Region