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Project Synopsis: the Ferris Mountain project area consists of mainly timbered slopes, interspersed with upland areas dominated by sagebrush, grass, and mountain shrub communities. Timber stands within the project unit consist of Douglas fir, subalpine fir, spruce, lodgepole pine, limber pine, and aspen, in addition to scattered locations of Rocky Mountain juniper. Long-term suppression of wildfires has promoted the encroachment of conifers into shrublands, aspen stands, and drainages supporting aspen, waterbirch and willows, to the point where many of these communities are non-functional. Decadence and disease is commonly observed in terms of mistletoe, blister rust, and bleeding rust, and pine beetles have...
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Covering 120 million acres across 14 western states and 3 Canadian provinces, sagebrush provides critical habitat for species such as pronghorn, mule deer, and sage-grouse – a species of conservation concern. The future of these and other species is closely tied to the future of sagebrush. Yet this important ecosystem has already been affected by fire, invasive species, land use conversion, and now, climate change. In the western U.S., temperatures are rising and precipitation patterns are changing. However, there is currently a limited ability to anticipate the impacts of climate change on sagebrush. Current methods suffer from a range of weakness that limits the reliability of results. In fact, the current uncertainty...
The objective of the project is to improve the infrastructure of the Red Rim Wildlife Habitat Management Area (WHMA) as well as conduct habitat improvements. Two windmills will be upgraded to solar pumps and panels. Six and a half miles of fence will be converted from woven wire to wildlife friendly fencing and 8 miles of fence will have single strand conversion to meet BLM and WGFD wildlife standards (i.e. the bottom wire is too low or the top wire is too high). An exclosure will be erected around a riparian area to keep cattle out, sagebrush will be thinned (approx. 140 acres), weeds will be treated (approx. 200 acres) and native grasses and legumes sown (approx. 170 acres). The Red Rim WHMA is located southwest...
FY2014Although the future of sage grouse depends on the future of sagebrush, we have limited ability to anticipate impacts of climate change on sagebrush populations. Current efforts to forecast sagebrush habitat typically rely on species distribution models (SDMs), which suffer from a variety of well-known weaknesses. However, by integrating SDMs with complementary research approaches, such as historical data analysis and mechanistic models, we can provide increased confidence in projections of habitat change. Our goal is to forecast the effect of climate change on the distribution and abundance of big sagebrush in order to inform conservation planning, and sage grouse management in particular, across the Intermountain...
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This project represents a continuation and expansion from the KFO’s 2004 CCI Project #21055 - Bear River Cooperative Weed Management. This project is for spraying and biological control of all Invasive/Noxious Weeds within the Kemmerer Field Office (KFO) area within Lincoln and Uinta Counties. Funding costs includes hiring seasonal staff and a vehicle to continue inventorying and mapping of weeds within the area. In 2009, 1,000 acres of weeds will be treated on BLM lands and 1,000 treated acres will be evaluated. Efforts will first be directed to areas where the resource benefits are most important as identified by the WLCI and the KFO. Maintaining the native vegetative communities and protecting them from invading...
This project is intended to provide a source of native seed and plant material for BLM’s Wyoming field office programs and projects. The intent of this proposal is to develop and maintain a supply of native plant seed, vegetative propagules, and native seed reserves for use on BLM projects primarily within the Green River Basin, SW Wyoming. This project would assist in providing native plant material and seed for watershed restoration projects on federal lands. The project is in compliance with National BLM native plant policies and goals. Currently, Wyoming BLM does not have native species under cultivation. The native plant program will provide seed and seedlings for field office’s programs, principally wildfire...
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This project improves the age class and diversity of plant communities. Improving transitional range will help hold the antelope and deer in this area, saving crucial winter areas for use later in the season. Other wildlife benefitting from this treatment are small mammals and a variety of birds, including sage grouse. Quality, quantity, and availability of forage in this transitional-migratory area will be improved. The units of accomplishments for this project, 10,000 acres (JM), are shared with multiple funding sources; due to the timing of the project; some units will carry over into FY 08. Some of the included acres are within the Wildland Urban Interface (JW).
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The sagebrush rangelands of the Great Basin provide crucial habitat for a diversity of wildlife, including the pronghorn and the greater sage-grouse. These water-limited, highly-managed ecosystems have already been degraded by wildfires, the expansion of invasive grasses, and livestock grazing, and are expected to experience additional stress as climate and land use conditions change. Effective management of sagebrush ecosystems in the future will require the ability to understand and predict these future changes. To address this need, researchers will identify historical rates and causes of vegetation change in shrubland ecosystems, then use this information to develop potential future climate and land use scenarios...
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The Forest Service proposes two prescribed burns at Weiner Creek (1,500 acres) and Lower Cottonwood Creek (400 acres) to restore aspen habitat in one of the most important elk calving areas for the Afton herd and important for aspen-dependent species, transition and winter range for elk, mule deer, and moose east of Alpine, transition and winter range for mule deer and elk of crucial winter range just east of Smoot, and sagebrush, aspen, meadow, and willow habitat on transition range for mule deer and elk 30 miles up the Greys River.
This project would increase the diversity and abundance of forbs and invertebrates in riparian and transitional riparian/upland areas. Treatments would include physical manipulation through mowing, imprinting, or just interseeding to create an enhanced vegetative mosiac within riparian or transitional riparian areas lacking in vegetative species and structural diversity. Since there are a number of invasives/exotic plants in the area, the area will be treated before seeding to ensure the natives species have an advantage. Mechanical manipulation for seed bed preparation, seeding of native seeds and control of invasives/exotic plants will be handled through contracts. This project focuses on improving habitat for...
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This project will utilize specific treatments on southwestern Wyoming salt-desert shrublands that have been invaded by halogeton to improve habitat conditions. Treatments to improve habitat conditions will include a variety of soil preparation techniques such as traditional till and minimal till and seeding techniques including drilling and broadcast seeding. Monitoring of these areas will occur post treatment to determine the most effective methods for restoration. Treatment and monitoring of treatments will occur for at least two years as part of this proposal. Background: Western states have experienced overwhelming anthropogenic disturbances in recent decades. This has resulted in the introduction of numerous...
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Livestock grazing practices are managed by private landowners and federal and state agencies across the western U.S. Increasingly, grazing strategies by these entities are incorporating conservation objectives and developing goals that include livestock production that is compatible with wildlife conservation objectives. This project evaluates the impact of conservation-oriented, rest-rotation livestock grazing and climate changes on migratory bird species associated with sagebrush habitat to better inform grazing management practices. Rest-rotation grazing management is likely to enhance important components of sagebrush, shrubland, and grassland habitat for a wide range of species, but little work has been done...
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Properly identifying the rarity of a species is essential to determine the amount of protection that needs to be applied. Clarifying the status of these species will allow industry to proactively manage their exploration and development activities. This project focuses on obtaining current species information throughout all the Field Offices and will identify and delineate the present location of these sensitive species.
Invasive weed treatments in the Ferris Mountain Wilderness Study Area (WSA) and adjacent Hogback ridges. Monitoring in 2005 showed actual infestation into the WSA for the first time, along with marked increase of acres infested along the fringes in this wildlife-rich WSA. These weeds are also increasing in the adjacent hogback ridges. This area is rugged and scenic with few access points. Treatment consists of herbicide application to control weeds. Retention of native vegetation benefits crucial winter habitat for bighorn sheep, sage-grouse, and other native wildlife. 2009 Update: We reported 400 acres treated, most of that was photo monitored with current patch information collected to show trend. Additional...
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The project consists of three distinct conservation projects: 1) the Sommers/Todd Place project, 2) the Scott Place project, and 3) the Duke Place project. All three projects combined encompass approximately 19,000 deeded acres located at two critical locations along the Green River in northern Sublette County and at an important corridor and buffer area between the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the Green River. Sommers/Todd Place: This portion of the porject encompasses over 5,100 deeded acres along the Green River. The ranches are contiguous and are located on both sides of the Green River. It is located along the west flank of the Pinedale Anticline natural gas field. The project includes a conservation...
A combination of efforts has been ongoing to understand the invasive mechanisms of this plant (Desert Alyssum) to spread and how to control it. A chemical application will be used in an effort to gain control of Desert Alyssum. This area has crucial winter range for antelope, deer and elk, and also has sage grouse wintering areas, brood-rearing habitat, as well as numerous leks. This funding would benefit the immediate area through the inventory and removal of Desert Alyssum which is competing with native vegetation. Monitoring transects have shown an increase in perennial plant spacing where Alyssum is dominant. Removal of Alyssum would improve or maintain habitat for wildlife and livestock using this area. Several...
Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) established a boundary fence in 1997 to prevent range cattle from grazing refuge habitat. The fencing contract specified a wildlife friendly configuration that included a smooth bottom wire no less than 16 inches above the ground. The nearly 100 mile boundary fence was completed for a total cost of $565,000. Approximately, 155,000 feet (~29 miles) of fence require adjustments to facilitate pronghorn migration. New fence construction currently costs about $1.00 a foot. However, since the existing fence is still in good condition, only the first two wires need to be adjusted with the bottom smooth wire no less than 16 to 18 inches above the ground ($0.40 per foot). This...
FY2015Persistent ecosystem and anthropogenic disturbances and stressors are threatening sustainability of sagebrush ecosystems in the western US, and managers and policy makers are seeking strategic, holistic approaches for species conservation and ecosystem restoration. Recent research indicates that an understanding of ecosystem resilience to disturbance and resistance to nonnative invasive species can be used to prioritize management activities across large landscapes and determine the most appropriate actions at project scales. An interagency WAFWA working group has linked this understanding with breeding habitat probabilities for Greater and Gunnison sage-grouse, and developed a habitat decision matrix for...
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Sagebrush steppe is one of the most widely distributed ecosystems in North America. Found in eleven western states, this important yet fragile ecosystem is dominated by sagebrush, but also contains a diversity of native shrubs, grasses, and flowering plants. It provides critical habitat for wildlife like pronghorn and threatened species such as the greater sage-grouse, and is grazed by livestock on public and private lands. However, this landscape is increasingly threatened by shifts in wildfire patterns, the spread of invasive grasses, and changing climate conditions. While sagebrush is slow to recover after fires, non-native grasses such as cheatgrass thrive in post-fire conditions and the spread of these species...
The project involves the recordation and management of a large archaeological complex surrounding Chicken Springs. The site has evidence of long term use and appears remain important to Native American tribes as a traditional cultural property at which ceremonies appear to be ongoing. The site has competing uses being along an access corridor to a developing gas field and having extensive recreational and tourism visitation. The project will record the resource and develop a management plan which will enhance the health of the lands in the area while managing increased demand for minerals and recreation. This project would meet the cultural requirements and also provide a management plan that could include consideration...


map background search result map search result map Flaming Gorge Halogeton Special Status Plant Species Monitoring and Inventory Lincoln and Uinta County Invasives Native Seed Development in Wyoming Ferris Mountain Leafy Spurge and Russian Knapweed Treatment Red Canyon/Elk Mountain Prescribed Burn Sommers/Grindstone Conservation Easement Weiner Creek and Lower Cottonwood Creek Prescription Burns Treat Sagebrush Habitat Red Rim Wildlife Habitat Management Area Improvements Chicken Springs Archeology Improve Refuge Boundary Fence for Pronghorn Antelope Migration Inventory and Control of Desert Alyssum in Lower Muddy Creek Watershed BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1 Assessing land use practices on ecological charateristics of sagebrush ecosystems Forecasting Future Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Forecasting Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Under Climate Change: Integration of Spatial, Temporal, and Mechanistic Models Using Resilience and Resistance Concepts to Develop a Strategic Approach for Managing Threats to Sagebrush Ecosystems and Greater Sage-Grouse in the Eastern Portion of the Range Improving the Success of Post-Fire Adaptive Management Strategies in Sagebrush Steppe Identifying Historical Drivers of Vegetation Change to Inform Future Management of Federal Lands in the Northern Great Basin Red Canyon/Elk Mountain Prescribed Burn Sommers/Grindstone Conservation Easement Identifying Historical Drivers of Vegetation Change to Inform Future Management of Federal Lands in the Northern Great Basin Lincoln and Uinta County Invasives BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1 Special Status Plant Species Monitoring and Inventory Improving the Success of Post-Fire Adaptive Management Strategies in Sagebrush Steppe Using Resilience and Resistance Concepts to Develop a Strategic Approach for Managing Threats to Sagebrush Ecosystems and Greater Sage-Grouse in the Eastern Portion of the Range Forecasting Future Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Forecasting Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Under Climate Change: Integration of Spatial, Temporal, and Mechanistic Models Assessing land use practices on ecological charateristics of sagebrush ecosystems