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Synopsis: Using multi-scale seasonal models, this study explored how broad scale landscape context and local resource heterogeneity influenced local resource selection among threatened forest-dwelling woodland caribou in southern Quebec. Caribou consistently avoided roads, however researchers identified thresholds in road proximity effects. The threshold distance at which caribou avoid roads is 1.25 km for active roads and 0.75 km from derelict roads. Open lichen woodlands were an important cover type for caribou during winter and spring, whereas deciduous forests, wetlands, and even young disturbed stands became important during calving and summer. Landscape cover type and amount explained more variation in habitat...
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Conclusions: Grizzly bears can use roaded habitats, but spatial avoidance will increase and survival will decrease as traffic levels, road densities and human settlement increases. Road density standards and road closure programmes should be developed and that these programmes incorporate seasonal habitat requirements of grizzly bears. Thresholds/Learnings: More than 80% of bear sitings occurred in blocks of undisturbed habitat >900 ha Synopsis: The study examined the relationships between grizzly bears, habitat and roads in the Swan Mountains, Montana. The study showed complex spatial and temporal relationships between grizzly bears and habitat resources. Resource selection was expressed relative to strength...
Conclusions:Woodland caribou cross roads less than expected for all time periods except calving and use areas close to roads less frequently than expected. Roads are semipermeable barriers to caribou movement with the greatest barrier effects occurring during late winter.Thresholds/Learnings:
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Conclusions: Grizzly bears avoid high volume roads (25,000 vehicles/day). High quality habitat determines movement decisions relative to roads. Grizzly bears will cross high volume roads to access high-quality habitat. Grizzly bears use areas close to roads more than expected, in particular low-volume roads (10,000 vehicles/day). Prevent loss of habitat connectivity with the following mitigation: maintain high-quality habitat adjacent to roads, install continuous highway fencing and create wildlife passages. Thresholds/Learnings: Synopsis: The study examined the relationships among grizzly bears, their habitats and roads in Banff National Park, a protected area characterized by a major transportation corridor. This...
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Conclusions: Despite the fact that valuable grizzly habitat tends to coincide with the location of roads, grizzlies strongly avoided roads regardless of traffic volume, suggesting that even a few vehicles can displace bears from adjacent habitats. Thresholds/Learnings: Grizzlies strongly avoided areas within 100m of all roads Synopsis: This study aimed to determine whether grizzly bears were displaced by roads associated with resource extraction industries in the Rocky Mountains. Since many habitats close to roads contained important bear foods, researchers expected bears to frequent these roads, despite the presence of human activity. However, study results indicated that grizzlies strongly avoided roads regardless...


    map background search result map search result map Assessing the influence of resource co-variates at multiple spatial scales: an application to forest-dwelling caribou faced with intensive human activity. Grizzly bears and resource extraction industries: effects of road on behavior, habitat use, and demography. Relationships among grizzly bears, highways, and habitat in Banff-Bow Valley, Alberta, Canada. Relationships among grizzly bears, roads, and habitat in the Swan Mountains, Montana. Relationships among grizzly bears, highways, and habitat in Banff-Bow Valley, Alberta, Canada. Grizzly bears and resource extraction industries: effects of road on behavior, habitat use, and demography. Assessing the influence of resource co-variates at multiple spatial scales: an application to forest-dwelling caribou faced with intensive human activity. Relationships among grizzly bears, roads, and habitat in the Swan Mountains, Montana.