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This map is one of the layers used to recreate Figure 2 in Churkina and Running (1998) in Data Basin (file title: Climate controls on plant growth) Each pixel (0.5 x 0.5) on the map represents a value derived from a specific function of annual mean temperature (Figure 1 in Churkina and Running 1998). Exerpt from Churkina and Running 1998: Though extreme low mean annual temperatures restrict vegetation productivity, less extreme low temperatures may also limit plant productivity during the period of maximum growth. The degree of thermal limitation on NPP gradually declines as the annual temperatures rise; the limitation increases again when the annual temperatures get too high. Vegetation productivity can be...
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This map is one of the layers used to recreate Figure 2 in Churkina and Running (1998) in Data Basin (file title: Climate controls on plant growth). Each pixel (0.5 degree x 0.5 degree) on the map represents a value derived from a specific function of the water balance coefficient (Figure 1 in Churkina and Running 1998). Excerpt from Churkina and Running 1998: To estimate the amount of available water [to plant growth], Churkina and Running calculated a water balance coefficient (WBC) as a difference between mean annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration where potential evapotranspiration was a function of mean temperature and net solar radiation (Priestley and Taylor 1972). WBC computation was based...
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This map is one of the layers used to recreate Figure 2 in Churkina and Running (1998) in Data Basin (file title: Climate controls on plant growth). Each pixel (0.5ox0.5o) on the map represents a value derived from a specific function of the percentage of sunshine hours per year (Figure 1 in Churkina and Running 1998). Exerpt from Churkina and Running 1998: Although clouds can dramatically reduce the amount of incoming photosynthetically active radiation, plants still photosynthesize on a cloudy day by using diffuse radiation, but at lower rates. Thus, we assumed that cloudiness considerably reduced incoming solar radiation and NPP in areas with low percentages of sunshine hours per year. Vegetation productivity...


    map background search result map search result map Radiation (cloudiness) limitation on plant growth Temperature (annual mean) limitation on plant growth Plant available water limitation on plant growth Radiation (cloudiness) limitation on plant growth Temperature (annual mean) limitation on plant growth Plant available water limitation on plant growth