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We estimated global cyanobacterial biomass in the main reservoirs of cyanobacteria on Earth: marine and freshwater plankton, arid land soil crusts, and endoliths. Estimates were based on typical population density values as measured during our research, or as obtained from literature surveys, which were then coupled with data on global geographical area coverage. Among the marine plankton, the global biomass of Prochlorococcus reaches 120 × 10^12 grams of carbon (g C), and that of Synechoccus some 43 × 10^12 g C. This makes Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, in that order, the most abundant cyanobacteria on Earth. Tropical marine blooms of Trichodesmium account for an additional 10 × 10^12 g C worldwide. In terrestrial...
We examined changes in small mammal habitat and densities of four small mammal species, including deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), gray-collared chipmunks (Tamias cinereicollis), golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis), and Mexican woodrats (Neotoma mexicana), 2?3 years after thinning and prescribed fire treatments in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests of northern Arizona, US. These treatments were designed to simultaneously reduce high-severity fire risk while returning forests to conditions more representative of pre-European settlement structure and function. Treatments resulted in changes in important components of small mammal habitat, including increased herbaceous vegetation, decreased...
Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) are social North American ground squirrels whose social system has been shown to vary with food resource distributions, as predicted by the habitat variability-mating system model. We expanded this model to include the effects of variations in population densities, in addition to resource distributions, on both the social system and the individual mating strategies of Gunnison's prairie dogs. Specifically, we predicted that monogamy would be associated with uniform resources, regardless of population density, giving way to polygyny with increasing resource patchiness at intermediate densities, and to multiple males and females at high population densities. In addition,...