Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: ponderosa pine (X)

18 results (301ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
We examined patterns of non-native plant diversity in protected and managed ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir forests of the Colorado Front Range. Cheesman Lake, a protected landscape, and Turkey Creek, a managed landscape, appear to have had similar natural disturbance histories prior to European settlement and fire protection during the last century. However, Turkey Creek has experienced logging, grazing, prescribed burning, and recreation since the late 1800s, while Cheesman Lake has not. Using the modified-Whittaker plot design to sample understory species richness and cover, we collected data for 30 0.1 ha plots in each landscape. Topographic position greatly influenced results, while management history did not. At...
thumbnail
This tabular, machine-readable CSV file contains annual phenometrics at locations in ponderosa pine ecosystems across Arizona and New Mexico that experienced stand-clearing, high-severity fire. The locations represent areas of vegetative recovery towards pre-fire (coniferous/pine) vegetation communities or towards novel grassland, shrubland, or deciduous replacements. Each sampled area is associated with the point location (latitude/longitude) as well as multiple calendar year phenometrics derived from the time-series of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values in the phenology software package Timesat v3.2.
thumbnail
These data were extracted from the CALVEG Existing Vegetation tiles, using the CWHR type, Yellow Pine (including Ponderosa Pine, Jeffrey Pine, Eastside Pine) and clipped to the Northern Sierra Nevada Zone for the CA LCC.These CALVEG Existing Vegetation tiles have been crosswalked to other classification systems, including the California Wildlife Habitat Relationship System (CWHR).The CWHR habitat classification scheme has been developed to support the CWHR System, a wildlife information system and predictive model for California's regularly-occurring birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. When first published in 1988, the classification scheme had 53 habitats. These habitats — except the non-vegetated Barren...
thumbnail
Colorados Front Range represents a region of the Southern Rockies LCC that is both ecologically and economically significant. It is home to the majority of Colorados residents, including the major population centers of Denver, Fort Collins, Boulder, and Colorado Springs, and provides critical ecosystem services such as clean and abundant water, wildlife habitat, recreation opportunities, and aesthetic values to the rest of the state. Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) dominated forests span the majority of the Front Range mountains and foothills, covering approximately 700,000 acres of the Front Range landscape between 5000 and 8500 ft elevation. The lower-montane zone ponderosa pine forests (~5500-7000 ft) form the...
thumbnail
This data set contains output from the dynamic vegetation model MC1, as modified to simulate future woody encroachment in the northern Great Plains, for 23 monthly variables, 63 yearly variables, and 31 multi-year variables. Variables include simulated plant (by growth form) and soil carbon stocks, net primary production, vegetation type, potential and actual evapotranspiration, stream flow, and fuel mass and moisture. Model output is provided for the EQ, Spinup, Historical, and Future stages of MC1 runs; future stages were run for four climate projections crossed with 10 or 11 fire X grazing X CO2 concentration scenarios for the western and eastern portions of the study area, respectively.
thumbnail
These data were extracted from the CALVEG Existing Vegetation tiles, using the CWHR type, Yellow Pine (including Ponderosa Pine, Jeffrey Pine, Eastside Pine) and clipped to the Southern Sierra Nevada Zone for the CA LCC.These CALVEG Existing Vegetation tiles have been crosswalked to other classification systems, including the California Wildlife Habitat Relationship System (CWHR).The CWHR habitat classification scheme has been developed to support the CWHR System, a wildlife information system and predictive model for California's regularly-occurring birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. When first published in 1988, the classification scheme had 53 habitats. These habitats — except the non-vegetated Barren...
thumbnail
These data were extracted from the CALVEG Existing Vegetation tiles, using the CWHR type, Yellow Pine (including Ponderosa Pine, Jeffrey Pine, Eastside Pine) and clipped to the Central Sierra Nevada Zone for the CA LCC.These CALVEG Existing Vegetation tiles have been crosswalked to other classification systems, including the California Wildlife Habitat Relationship System (CWHR).The CWHR habitat classification scheme has been developed to support the CWHR System, a wildlife information system and predictive model for California's regularly-occurring birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. When first published in 1988, the classification scheme had 53 habitats. These habitats — except the non-vegetated Barren...
Soil respiration in semiarid ecosystems responds positively to temperature, but temperature is just one of many factors controlling soil respiration. Soil moisture can have an overriding influence, particularly during the dry/warm portions of the year. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the influence of soil moisture on the relationship between temperature and soil respiration. Soil samples collected from a range of sites arrayed across a climatic gradient were incubated under varying temperature and moisture conditions. Additionally, we evaluated the impact of substrate quality on short-term soil respiration responses by carrying out substrate-induced respiration assessments for each soil at nine different...
Many abiotic and biotic factors affect the health of roadside vegetation, including the application of magnesium chloride (MgCl2) dust suppression products. Three hundred seventy kilometers (230 mi) of forested, shrubland, meadow, rangeland, riparian, and wetland roadside habitats were surveyed along major nonpaved roads in two Colorado counties. Dominant species composition and visible damages of woody roadside vegetation were quantified. The majority (72.3% to 79.3%) of roadside vegetation surveyed was considered healthy (less than 5% damage to crown or stem), depending on slope position from the road. Severely damaged (greater than 50% damage) vegetation ranged from 6.4% to 11.4% of roadside cover, with the most...
Fire severity, frequency, and extent are expected to change dramatically in coming decades in response to changing climatic conditions, superimposed on the adverse cumulative effects of various human-related disturbances on ecosystems during the past 100 years or more. To better gauge these expected changes, knowledge of climatic and human influences on past fire regimes is essential. We characterized the temporal and spatial properties of fire regimes in ponderosa pine forests of the southern San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado by collecting 175 fire-scarred tree samples from nine sites across a wide range of topographic settings. All tree rings and fire scars were dated using standard dendrochronological...
thumbnail
These maps are a digital representation of the individual tree species range maps of the Atlas of the United States Trees by Elbert L. Little, Jr. The atlas shows the natural distribution or range of the native tree species of North America. These coverages represent 3 volumes of the atlas.
Native plant recovery following wildfires is of great concern to managers because of the potential for increased water run-off and soil erosion associated with severely burned areas. Although postfire seeding with exotic grasses or cultivars of native grasses (seeded grasses) may mitigate the potential for increased run-off and erosion, such treatments may also be detrimental to long-term recovery of other native plant species. The degree to which seeded grasses dominate a site and reduce native plant diversity may be a function of the availability of resources such as nitrogen and light and differing abilities of native and seeded grasses to utilize available resources. We tested the hypothesis that seeded grasses...
Many studies have investigated the ecological effects of roads and roadsides as both habitat and dispersal corridors for exotic plant species. Several of these compared roadside exotic species richness and abundance with adjacent interior habitats, but we found no studies of individual exotic species' abundance between the two habitats in the context of prescribed fire. We measured exotic species richness and individual species' abundance along roadsides and in adjacent interior habitat (> 150 m) before and after prescribed fire at three ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson & C. Lawson) sites in northern Arizona. Eighteen of the 20 exotic plant species found in this study have been and continue to be...
thumbnail
The dataset contains 3 maps that show the current and predicted range of Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) in the Pacific Northwest region. The layers include: 1) the species range modeled under current climate conditions for 1950-75 2) a continuous model of the predicted range for 1950-2006 and 3) potential range expansion and contraction from 2000-2009.


    map background search result map search result map Output from MC1 Model Modified to Simulate Future Woody Encroachment in the Northern Great Plains CWHR Habitat Type - Yellow Pine, Southern Sierra Nevada Zone CWHR Habitat Type - Yellow Pine, Northern Sierra Nevada Zone CWHR Habitat Type - Yellow Pine, Central Sierra Nevada Zone Current and predicted range of Ponderosa Pine under climate change in the Pacific Northwest Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) extent, North America Collaborative Multi-species Monitoring in the Southern Rockies LCC: Impacts of Forest Restoration Treatments on Ponderosa Pine Ecosystems in Colorado BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Viability in the NGB 2060 BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Current Viability in the NGB BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Viability in the NGB 2030 Phenology pattern data indicating recovery trajectories of ponderosa pine forests after high-severity fires Collaborative Multi-species Monitoring in the Southern Rockies LCC: Impacts of Forest Restoration Treatments on Ponderosa Pine Ecosystems in Colorado CWHR Habitat Type - Yellow Pine, Central Sierra Nevada Zone CWHR Habitat Type - Yellow Pine, Northern Sierra Nevada Zone CWHR Habitat Type - Yellow Pine, Southern Sierra Nevada Zone Phenology pattern data indicating recovery trajectories of ponderosa pine forests after high-severity fires BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Viability in the NGB 2060 BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Current Viability in the NGB BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Viability in the NGB 2030 Output from MC1 Model Modified to Simulate Future Woody Encroachment in the Northern Great Plains Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) extent, North America Current and predicted range of Ponderosa Pine under climate change in the Pacific Northwest