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Synopsis: In an attempt to better characterize the influence of human settlement patterns on wolf distribution, this paper examined how radio-collared gray wolves responded to different road types and human presence at the boundaries of Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in south-central Alaska. Wolves tended to avoid oilfield access roads that were open to the public, but were attracted to gated pipeline access roads and secondary gravel roads with limited human use. The low use access and secondary roads likely provided an easy travel corridor for wolves. Prior to intensive trapping and hunting from 1978-1979, wolves demonstrated little territorial adjustment in response to a heavily used highway. However, only after...
Conclusions:Forest clearcutting differentialy affects birds of different ages. There is a threshold distance between reserves below which birds do not mind crossing clear cuts, making corridors more important as clearcut area and distance between forest reserves expandsThresholds/Learnings:
Effective conservation of amphibian populations requires the prediction of how amphibians use and move through a landscape. Amphibians are closely coupled to their physical environment. Thus an approach that uses the physiological attributes of amphibians, together with knowledge of their natural history, should be helpful. We used Niche Mapper? to model the known movements and habitat use patterns of a population of Western toads (Anaxyrus (=Bufo) boreas) occupying forested habitats in southeastern Idaho. Niche Mapper uses first principles of environmental biophysics to combine features of topography, climate, land cover, and animal features to model microclimates and animal physiology and behavior across landscapes....
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Conclusions: Edge structure affects movement patterns in chickadee flocks. Flocks tend to move parallel to forest edges. Thresholds/Learnings: Synopsis: During a two-year study of chickadee flocks in a fragmented agricultural landscape near Edmonton, Alberta, researchers tested the degree to which flocks responded to forest boundaries based on changes in vegetation, foraging sites, and edge structure near these boundaries. The results indicate that sharp forest boundaries (edges) acted strongly as movement corridors for birds, encouraging flocks to move parallel (within 75 m) to forest edges.
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Synopsis: This study examined the reluctance of different birds species to cross habitat gaps in a fragmented forest landscape. Researchers induced birds in the post-fledging period to cross gaps of varying widths and to choose between routes through woodland or across open areas by attracting them with recorded chickadee mobbing calls. Overall, birds were twice as likely to travel through 50 m of woodland than they were to travel through 50 m of open gap areas to reach the recording. When given a choice of traveling through woodland or across a gap, the majority of birds preferred woodland routes, even when they were three times longer than shortcuts in the open. Birds did not just use movement corridors, but strongly...
This map shows least-cost corridors and large natural habitat blocks. These blocks and corridors may provide an essential network for various species to disperse through the landscape. Blocks are based on large areas of contiguous natural vegetation cover, and are subdivided by major roads. We connected blocks using sticks (to define a pair of blocks between which to model corridors), and developed least-cost corridors based on a cost surface developed from land cover.


    map background search result map search result map Understanding avian responses to forest boundaries: a case study with chickadee winter flocks. Gap crossing decisions by forest songbirds during the post-fledgling period. Gray wolf response to refuge boundaries and roads in Alaska. Colorado Plateau REA MQ D1: What is the distribution of movement corridors? Understanding avian responses to forest boundaries: a case study with chickadee winter flocks. Gap crossing decisions by forest songbirds during the post-fledgling period. Gray wolf response to refuge boundaries and roads in Alaska. Colorado Plateau REA MQ D1: What is the distribution of movement corridors?