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Phase 1 & 2 (2010, 2012): This project developed a sampling design and monitoring protocol for wintering shorebirds in the Central Valley and in the San Francisco Bay Estuary and develop an LCC-specific online shorebird monitoring portal publicly available at the California Avian Data Center. The three objectives in Phase II of this project are: 1) Complete the shorebird monitoring plan for the CA LCC by developing a sampling design and monitoring protocol for wintering shorebirds in coastal southern California and northern Mexico. 2) Develop models to evaluate the influence of habitat factors from multiple spatial scales on shorebird use of San Francisco Bay and managed wetlands in the Sacramento Valley, as a model...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2010, 2011, 2013, Academics & scientific researchers, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
Tidal marsh habitat is at high risk of severe loss and degradation as a result of human uses, sea-level rise, changes in salinity, and more frequent and extreme storms projected by climate models. Availability of habitat is a prerequisite for long-term viability of marsh bird populations and this has been modeled in a companion California Landscape Conservation Cooperative project (Veloz et al. 2011). However, habitat alone will ensure neither resilience nor recovery of depleted and threatened populations. To provide management guidance to reduce species’ vulnerability and recover depleted populations, we developed interactive population dynamic models for four key marsh species: Black Rail, Clapper Rail, Common...
Energy autarky is presented as a conceptual framework for implementing sustainable regional development based on the transformation of the energy subsystem. It is conceptualized as a situation in which the energy services used for sustaining local consumption, local production and the export of goods and services are derived from locally renewable energy resources. Technically, the implementation of higher degrees of energy autarky rests on increasing energy efficiency, realizing the potential of renewable energy resources and relying on a decentralized energy system. Practically, a transition towards regional energy autarky requires administrations and civil society actors to initialize and develop projects at...
The primary supposition about renewable forms of energy is that use of such resources will not result in depletion or exhaustion. While it is true that natural energy flows such as sun and wind are not directly subject to degradation by use, there may still be indirect limitations on renewability. The exploitation of natural energy flows may require that systems of nonrenewable "support" resources be used to capture, store, and convert natural energy into useful forms. Poor resource management practices that degrade the support resources may therefore, in effect, endanger renewability. Biomass is an illustrative case of a renewable energy resource with nonrenewable support components. The soil and water management...
The primary supposition about renewable forms of energy is that use of such resources will not result in depletion or exhaustion. While it is true that natural energy flows such as sun and wind are not directly subject to degradation by use, there may still be indirect limitations on renewability. The exploitation of natural energy flows may require that systems of nonrenewable "support" resources be used to capture, store, and convert natural energy into useful forms. Poor resource management practices that degrade the support resources may therefore, in effect, endanger renewability. Biomass is an illustrative case of a renewable energy resource with nonrenewable support components. The soil and water management...
Joseph A. Dammel, Jeffrey M. Bielicki, Melisa F. Pollak, and Elizabeth J. Wilson at the University of Minnesota Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy have published a feature article titled “A Tale of Two Technologies: Hydraulic Fracturing and Geologic Carbon Sequestration” that appears in the online version of the science journal, Environmental Science & Technology [subscription required]. In comparing, contrasting, and analyzing the regulatory landscape governing the use of hydraulic fracturing and geologic carbon sequestration, they conclude that “A shift toward a 21st Century vision of regulation is required. Hydraulic fracturing and geologic sequestration are both technologies that could reduce...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: coal, dynamics, investment, model, system
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through statistical...
Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) has come to dominate millions of hectares of rangeland in the Intermountain western United States. Previous studies have hypothesized that one mechanism conferring a competitive advantage to this species is the ability to germinate rapidly at low temperatures in the fall, winter and spring and, therefore, initiate growth and establishment more rapidly than more desirable perennial bunchgrass species. In this experiment, we developed thermal-germination-response models for multiple seedlots of cheatgrass and five perennial grass species. We conducted sensitivity analysis on potential-cumulative-germination response to a 38-year simulation of field-variable conditions of seedbed temperature...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through statistical...
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This map shows the predicted area of high fire potential for the current year up to the end of the forecast period as simulated by a modified version of the MC1 Dynamic General Vegetation Model (DGVM). Different colors indicate the level of consensus among five different MC1 simulations (i.e., one for each forecast provided by five different weather models), ranging from one of five to five of five simulations predicting high fire potential. The area of high fire potential is where PDSI and MC1-calculated values of potential fire behavior (fireline intensity for forest and shrubland and rate of spread of spread for grassland) exceed calibrated threshold values. Potential fire behavior in MC1 is estimated using...
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This map shows the predicted area of high fire potential for the current year up to the end of the forecast period as simulated by a modified version of the MC1 Dynamic General Vegetation Model (DGVM). Different colors indicate the level of consensus among five different MC1 simulations (i.e., one for each forecast provided by five different weather models), ranging from one of five to five of five simulations predicting high fire potential. The area of high fire potential is where PDSI and MC1-calculated values of potential fire behavior (fireline intensity for forest and shrubland and rate of spread of spread for grassland) exceed calibrated threshold values. Potential fire behavior in MC1 is estimated using...
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MC1 is a dynamic vegetation model for estimating the distribution of vegetation and associated ecosystem fluxes of carbon, nutrients, and water. It was created to assess the potential impacts of global climate change on ecosystem structure and function at a wide range of spatial scales from landscape to global. The model incorporates transient dynamics to make predictions about the patterns of ecological change. MC1 was created by combining physiologically based biogeographic rules defined in the MAPSS model with a modified version of the biogeochemical model, CENTURY. MC1 includes a fire module, MCFIRE, that mechanistically simulates the occurrence and impacts of fire events. Climate input data sources for this...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model Mc1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), Water leached in the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. the output is prsented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain....
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This dataset represents the average net primary production for each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Mean net primary production (in g m-2 per yr), was determined for each HUC5 watershed by averaging values of original ~ 4 km raster data. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al.2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1...
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Louisiana Waterthrush - VizBand/Land AIC Model Selection Created: 05-Oct-2011 Louisiana Waterthrush annual capture rate of adult (ADULT) individuals (log transformed) ranged between -0.220 and +2.009 with a mean value of +0.895 and a median value of +0.794. ________________________________________ Model 1 (2 parameters) Louisiana Waterthrush annual capture rate of adult (ADULT) individuals (log transformed) was a function of: a) DIST2RIV15 (-0.30142) - distance (m) to stream, ranged between -1.104 and +0.772 (95% CL) with a mean value of -0.166 and a median value of -0.121, b) NLCD06DE33P (+0.46681) - percent deciduous forest cover, 990m-resolution (33x aggregation of 30m-resolution), ranged between +1.446 and...
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Tree species locations
Tags: 3pg, forest, model


map background search result map search result map Simulated PNW biomass consumed (g C/m2) under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) Simulated runoff under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) in nillimeters for the Pacific Northwest, USA A Monitoring Protocol to Assess Wintering Shorebird Population Trends Tree species locations Simulated historical net primary production (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-November 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-May 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) Louisiana Waterthrush (AHY) Vegetation Type for the United States and Canada Simulated for Historical data for the years 1961-1990 by the MC1 Model (NA8K version) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) A Monitoring Protocol to Assess Wintering Shorebird Population Trends Simulated PNW biomass consumed (g C/m2) under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) Simulated runoff under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 (2070-2099 average) in nillimeters for the Pacific Northwest, USA Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for October for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under MIROC 3.2 medres A2 in cm for April for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for August for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Total soil residual water simulated under CSIRO MK3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Simulated historical net primary production (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Louisiana Waterthrush (AHY) Tree species locations MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-November 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast January-May 2012 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) Vegetation Type for the United States and Canada Simulated for Historical data for the years 1961-1990 by the MC1 Model (NA8K version)