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Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains on the east side and narrows to approximately 600 meters at one pinch point near the Carlin -Pete Mine area. The migration route generally spans about 30 miles to the northeast to higher elevations in the northern Tuscarora Mountains. Important stopover areas include Richmond Mountain, Jack and Little Jack Creeks,...
Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summer ranges on the west side of the Tuscarora Mountains. However, some deer in this population migrate much farther – approximately 80 miles – and connect with mule deer that summer east of the Humboldt River. This deer herd faces several challenges, including migration routes that pass through increased mineral extraction activities...
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The project will modify approximately 24 total miles of existing woven-wire, 6-strand and 5-strand barbed wire fence to 3 or 4-wire fence built with wildlife specifications to facilitate big game movement on the Grizzly Wildlife Habitat Management Area (WHMA). The new fences will be built to standard Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) wildlife specifications for wire spacing including a smooth bottom wire positioned 16-18 inches above the ground, and a ratio of three steel posts per one wood post. The fence modification work is planned in phases, where the contractor would remove and reconstruct 4 miles of fence annually on the WHMA during a 6-year period to accomplish the entire 24-mile improvement project....
The information presented below serves as an agreement for the users of the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation’s Trail Mapping Interface Program. This agreement can be changed whenever necessary. In this case, the agreement becomes valid as soon as it is posted on this Website. This interactive map is for information purposes only. The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) gathered the road and trail information for this map from the United States Forest Service (USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (Idaho State Office). No warranty is m The information presented below serves as an agreement for the users of the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation’s Trail Mapping Interface Program....
This is the data archive for the publication Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1 (Kauffman et al. 2020) and includes the collection of GIS map files that are mapped and described in the report. These map files are meant to provide a common spatial representation of the mapped migrations. This data release provides the means for ungulate migrations to be mapped and planned for across a wide variety of landscapes where they occur. Due to data sharing constraints of participating agencies, not all the files that underlie the mapped migrations included in the report have been released. Data can be viewed at: https://westernmigrations.net. Data in this archive can be downloaded two ways. To download...
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The project consists of three distinct conservation projects: 1) the Sommers/Todd Place project, 2) the Scott Place project, and 3) the Duke Place project. All three projects combined encompass approximately 19,000 deeded acres located at two critical locations along the Green River in northern Sublette County and at an important corridor and buffer area between the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the Green River. Sommers/Todd Place: This portion of the porject encompasses over 5,100 deeded acres along the Green River. The ranches are contiguous and are located on both sides of the Green River. It is located along the west flank of the Pinedale Anticline natural gas field. The project includes a conservation...
Elk within the Clarks Fork herd migrate though some of the most rugged and remote terrain in the lower 48 states. The herd, which numbers around 3,000, winters in the Sunlight Basin and the Absaroka foothills just west of Cody, WY. Winter ranges are a mix of sagebrush hills and lodgepole pine forests, within expansive private ranchlands. During migration, animals travel an average one-way distance of 33 miles, with some animals migrating as far as 67 miles. Spring migrations off of winter range head west towards Yellowstone National Park, up several drainages that flow out of the Absaroka Mountains, including the Clarks Fork of the Yellowstone, Crandall Creek, and smaller creeks to the south. Summer ranges consist...
The Rawlins Fence Conversions is a continuation of the Muddy Creek and WY Youth Conservation Crew fencing conversion completed in 2008. This project also compliments the Grizzly WHMA Fence Conversion Project and the Red Rim WHMA Improvement Project by removing impenetrable sheep fence and converting it to “wildlife friendly” fence. This large-scale conversion is necessary to maintain migration corridors and provide access to good habitat, especially as these herds face increasing bottlenecks from oil and gas development or during severe winter weather. Since over half of crucial winter range occurs in mixed land ownership, partnering with permittees and other private landowners are critical to complete fence...
The Cody elk herd migrates across rugged country on the eastern side of the Absaroka Mountains near Cody, WY. This large herd of 6,000-7,000 animals winters in foothill habitat to the south and west of Cody. There are three core winter areas, namely the valleys formed by the North and South Fork of the Shoshone River and the headwaters of the Greybull River north to Meeteetse creek. In spring, the elk that winter along the North Fork of the Shoshone generally follow the river west towards the park, some of them branching up Eagle Creek and other tributaries. The elk that winter in the South Fork of the Shoshone follow it upstream in spring, eventually heading west up Ishawooa Creek and into the Thorofare and Yellowstone...
Migratory movements of elk within the Piney herd unit, a large area encompassing the eastern side of the Wyoming, include short (i.e., 10 miles) to medium (i.e., 30 miles) distance migrations. These elk migrate from low elevation elk feedgrounds and native winter ranges in the Upper Green River Basin to high elevation summer ranges in the Wyoming Range. In summer, some elk head further west into the Grey’s River Basin from the Bench Corral and Forest Park feedgrounds. Challenges for Piney elk include energy development, especially in the southern portion of the herd unit. These data provide the location of migration routes for Elk (Cervus canadensis) in the Piney herd in Wyoming. They were developed from Brownian...
The Fossil Butte (hereafter referred to as the Monument in this section of the report) elk population winters in the southern Wyoming Range between Fossil Butte National Monument and Cokeville (fig. 45). During spring, they migrate north short (11 mi [18 km]) to medium (74 mi [119 km]) distances. The segment of the elk population that winters near the Monument migrates into the Wyoming Range at the head of the Hams Fork and LaBarge Creek. This population departs their summer ranges during the beginning of archery season in early fall for the Monument, where no hunting is allowed. Elk wintering closer to Cokeville migrate north in the spring along the western edge of the Wyoming Range. Cokeville collared elk departed...
The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of this population, known as the “Pequop” herd, crosses a major highway (US highway 93) and an interstate (Interstate-80) twice annually during their seasonal migration. Several million dollars in wildlife crossing structures have been constructed to help these deer during their migration, yet they still face challenges to connectivity between...


    map background search result map search result map Rawlins Fence Conversions Sommers/Grindstone Conservation Easement Grizzly Wildlife Habitat Management Area Fence Modification Idaho Trails Web Application Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1 Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Elk in Clarks Fork in Wyoming Migration Routes of Elk in Cody Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Elk in Fossil Buttes Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Elk in the Piney Herd in Wyoming Sommers/Grindstone Conservation Easement Grizzly Wildlife Habitat Management Area Fence Modification Migration Routes of Elk in Clarks Fork in Wyoming Migration Routes of Elk in Fossil Buttes Population in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains in Nevada Migration Routes of Elk in Cody Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Elk in the Piney Herd in Wyoming Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Sheep Creek Range in Nevada Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Pequop Mountains in Nevada Idaho Trails Web Application Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1