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In theory, co-management is defined as a partnership arrangement in which government, the community of local resource users, and other resource stakeholders, share the responsibility and authority for the management of a resource. In practice, however, co-management has been used to describe a number of resource management regimes, ranging from processes that utilize only community consultation, to partnerships that incorporate equal participant decision-making. Under Northern Canadian Land Claim Settlements, co-management commonly involves joint decision making and shared responsibility regarding resource planning and management. Although these resource management boards have the financial and legal backing of...
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In recent years the management of the Copper River has provided an abundance of salmon but there are indications that certain wild stocks of sockeye and Chinook salmon may have declined from historical levels. In particular local people have indicated that climate change, beaver dams, and human use have altered salmon runs on certain tributary streams of the Copper River. Collecting traditional knowledge about past and present runs and correlating that data from the natural and social sciences (e.g. biology, geography, geology, anthropology, and archaeology) would extend our temporal knowledge of the Copper River salmon fishery and supplement and validate indices of abundance for Chinook and sockeye salmon. Eric...
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Hunters and Bureaucrats is actually one book and a journal article. The "book" deals with the issue of Aboriginal-state relations in co-management and how the Kluane people have been forced into accepting the language and institutions of "wildlife management" to protect their rights to and interests in animals, only to discover that such processes undermine their relationships with animals, while concentrating control over their lives in the hands of the state. Nadasdy is at his best when he discusses the integration/transformation processes to which Kluane peoples must subject their knowledge in order to participate in co-management. The focus on co-management accounts for some 80% of the volume's content, and...
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The field of adaptive management has been embraced by researchers and managers in the United States as an approach to improve natural resource stewardship in the face of uncertainty and complex environmental problems. Integrating multiple knowledge sources and feedback mechanisms is an important step in this approach. Our objective is to contribute to the limited literature that describes the benefits of better integrating indigenous knowledge (IK) with other sources of knowledge in making adaptive-management decisions. Specifically, we advocate the integration of traditional phenological knowledge (TPK), a subset of IK, and highlight opportunities for this knowledge to support policy and practice of adaptive management...
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The 7 Generations manual is designed for people in rural Alaska who want to accomplish environmental planning and management using a community-based approach. The manual contains valuable tools that enable a community to prioritize and identify its environmental issues. This manual was written to assist communities to be more self-reliant and to take responsibility for their own environmental issues. Building community strength to identify and solve problems is a powerful process that can lead to a healthier and more sustainable community. A community driven by the interests of its members will have a greater sense of ownership and pride in its accomplishments. A self-governing community also will have a greater...
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This thesis focuses on transactional process involved in the construction and operation of the Kuskokwim River Salmon Management Working Group. This cooperative wildlife management mechanism gives Yup'ik commercial and subsistence fishermen and other users a direct role, with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, in salmon management. Transactions involving participants' knowledge and values are described in three processes: (1) the establishment of a management body and its operating rules; (2) the mediation of power in decision-making; and, (3) fishery management which uses both "science" and "fishermen's knowledge." Results indicate that through cooperation in decision-making, data gathering, and other management...
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Excerpt from the Introduction: "This report characterizes the achievements of the Tanana Chiefs Conference, Inc.'s Tribal Environmental Restoration Program (TERP) during the 1999 calendar year. The report first introduces the reader to the history behind the development of TERP. Secondly, the report discusses the organization and intent of the TERP program. The remainder of the report reviews the various services performed by TERP program staff and the activities conducted by participating Tribal Liaison Officers to assess military impacts to TCC Tribes. For example, the regional report reviews the historical context of military impacts in Interior Alaska. Similarly, the report reviews the various levels of technical...
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This research combines Ahtna environmental knowledge with data from the biological and social sciences to document changes in the upper Copper River salmon fishery. Information in this report covers the period from 1989 to 2004. Ahtna elders have observed that over time, fisheries management and competition from other users have adversely affected the productivity of subsistence harvests. The Ahtna attribute effects on salmon spawning in the headwaters of the Copper River to environmental pollution and interception by commercial and recreational fishers. Since 1889, when the commercial fishing industry began, historical reports document various effects on Copper River salmon stocks and subsistence harvests. The...
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Co-management is an interdisciplinary field of scholarship and co-management researchers use concepts and methods drawn from a range of scholarly and applied disciplines. This is reflected in the papers included in this issue, and authors draw on analytical frameworks in anthropology, conservation ecology, environmental studies, geography, law, political and policy science, history and resource management. For example, [Harvey A. Feit] uses ethnohistory, resource management, analyses of bureaucratic practices and, with others, post-Foucauldian analyses of the state; Goetze uses conflict management, confidence-building theory and the international legal recognition of Indigenous rights, among other frameworks. Furthermore,...
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For over 1,000 years the Ahtna Athabascan people have fished for salmon in the Copper River and its tributatries. During that time they have gained a considerable knowledge of the salmon. THis report provides an overview of that knowledge including information on the Ahtna taxonomy of salmon and other fish, salmon life history, factors influencing the movement of salmon, harvesting devices and the preparation of fish, the traditional management system, and legends and stories about salmon.
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This report summarizes information obtained on salmon resources in the Kluane area watersheds of the White River sub-basin from interviews with Kluane First Nation members and local residents. Emphasis was placed on identifying areas of upwelling groundwater in Kluane Lake to help identify potential chum spawning habitat. A total of 12 First Nation and five non-First Nation individuals were interviewed during April and May, 2003. Several areas in Kluane Lake were identified where upwelling groundwater was observed or possibly indicated by areas remaining open in the winter. These areas included: near the mouths of Spring, Silver and No Name Creeks, Brooks Arm (Little Arm) near the narrows, Thorsen Bay, Sandspit...
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First Nations' participation in resource development projects is continuously changing. Some would argue that it is improving the situation for First Nations and their communities, while others would argue that First Nations still lack meaningful decision-making regarding the land on which we live. This thesis focuses on ways in which First Nations, more specifically the Tahltan First Nation, might improve consultation processes with government, industry, as well as internal consultation between leadership and membership. In undertaking this research, I show the Tahltan how a completed First Nation (Heiltsuk Nation) land use plan might raise and address the kinds of issues being discussed in Tahltan communities....


map background search result map search result map The Atna' and the Political Ecology of the Copper River Fishery, Alaska The Tahltan Nation and our consultation process with mining industry: How a land use plan might improve the process Evaluating co-management in the Sahtu: A framework for analysis Co-management as transaction: The Kuskokwim River Salmon Management Working Group Land Use Planning on Aboriginal Lands - Towards a New Model for Planning on Reserve Lands The Distribution of Shrubs used by Indigenous Peoples within the Forest-Tundra Ecotone in Canada DEH CHO REGIONAL WILDLIFE WORKSHOP Co-management and Indigenous Communities: Barriers and Bridges to Decentralized Resource Management: Introduction Conflicting Understandings of Wilderness and Subsistence in Alaskan National Parks Traditional and Local Knowledge Survey in the Kluane Area and Identification of Upwelling Groundwater Areas in Kluane Lake HUNTERS AND BUREAUCRATS: POWER, KNOWLEDGE AND ABORIGINAL-STATE RELATIONS IN THE SOUTHWEST YUKON Traditional knowledge and fishing practices of the Ahtna of the Copper River, Alaska Traditional Knowledge of Long Term Changes in Salmon Runs in the Copper River: Annual Report Ahtna knowledge of long-term changes in salmon runs in the Upper Copper River drainage, Alaska Tanana Chiefs Conference's Tribal Environmental Restoration Program's (TERP) 1999 Final Report on Military Impacts to Tribes in Interior Alaska Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History Indigenous Consent and Natural Resource Extraction The Distribution of Shrubs used by Indigenous Peoples within the Forest-Tundra Ecotone in Canada Ahtna knowledge of long-term changes in salmon runs in the Upper Copper River drainage, Alaska Traditional and Local Knowledge Survey in the Kluane Area and Identification of Upwelling Groundwater Areas in Kluane Lake DEH CHO REGIONAL WILDLIFE WORKSHOP Conflicting Understandings of Wilderness and Subsistence in Alaskan National Parks The Atna' and the Political Ecology of the Copper River Fishery, Alaska Traditional knowledge and fishing practices of the Ahtna of the Copper River, Alaska Traditional Knowledge of Long Term Changes in Salmon Runs in the Copper River: Annual Report The Tahltan Nation and our consultation process with mining industry: How a land use plan might improve the process Evaluating co-management in the Sahtu: A framework for analysis HUNTERS AND BUREAUCRATS: POWER, KNOWLEDGE AND ABORIGINAL-STATE RELATIONS IN THE SOUTHWEST YUKON Co-management as transaction: The Kuskokwim River Salmon Management Working Group Tanana Chiefs Conference's Tribal Environmental Restoration Program's (TERP) 1999 Final Report on Military Impacts to Tribes in Interior Alaska Land Use Planning on Aboriginal Lands - Towards a New Model for Planning on Reserve Lands Co-management and Indigenous Communities: Barriers and Bridges to Decentralized Resource Management: Introduction Aboriginal Rights Claims and the Making and Remaking of History Indigenous Consent and Natural Resource Extraction