Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: landscape evolution (X)

7 results (43ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Soil-covered upland landscapes constitute a critical part of the habitable world. Our understanding of how they evolve as a function of different climatic, tectonic and geological regimes is important across a wide range of disciplines and depends, in part, on understanding the links between chemical and physical weathering processes. Extensive previous work has shown that soil production rates decrease with increasing soil column thickness, but chemical weathering rates were not measured. Here we examine a granitic, soil-mantled hillslope at Point Reyes, California, where soil production rates were determined using in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides (10Be and 26Al), and we quantify the extent as well as the rates...
A wildfire in May 1996 burned 4690 hectares in two watersheds forested by ponderosa pine and Douglas fir in a steep, mountainous landscape with a summer, convective thunderstorm precipitation regime. The wildfire lowered the erosion threshold in the watersheds, and consequently amplified the subsequent erosional response to shorter time interval episodic rainfall and created both erosional and depositional features in a complex pattern throughout the watersheds. The initial response during the first four years was an increase in runoff and erosion rates followed by decreases toward pre-fire rates. The maximum unit-area peak discharge was 24 m3 s?1 km?2 for a rainstorm in 1996 with a rain intensity of 90 mm h?1....
thumbnail
This repository includes thermochronologic and geochronologic datasets generated for analysis and interpretation of the faulting history of the Kunlun Shan region of northern Tibet, as well as published timing of fault activity on other pertinent structures in the Tibetan Plateau.


    map background search result map search result map Primary and supplementary data for estimating the the timing of crustal shortening and the initiation of left-lateral shear within the central Kunlun Shan, northern Tibet Primary and supplementary data for estimating the the timing of crustal shortening and the initiation of left-lateral shear within the central Kunlun Shan, northern Tibet