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Aim: A conspicuous climatic and biogeographical transition occurs at 40?45� N in western North America. This pivot point marks a north?south opposition of wet and dry conditions at interannual and decadal time-scales, as well as the northern and southern limits of many dominant western plant species. Palaeoecologists have yet to focus on past climatic and biotic shifts along this transition, in part because it requires comparisons across dissimilar records [i.e. pollen from lacustrine sediments to the north and plant macrofossils from woodrat (Neotoma) middens to the south]. To overcome these limitations, we are extending the woodrat-midden record northward into the lowlands of the central Rocky Mountains. Published...
The invasion of 40 million hectares of the American West by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) has caused widespread modifications in the vegetation of semi-arid ecosystems and increased the frequency of fires. In addition to well-understood mechanisms by which cheatgrass gains competitive advantage, it has been implicated in reducing arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) abundance and taxa diversity. We evaluated this possibility at a high elevation site in a two-pronged approach. To test whether cheatgrass changed native AMF communities in ways that affected subsequent native plant growth, we grew cheatgrass and native plants in native soils and then planted native plants into these soils in a greenhouse experiment....
A gridline survey for exotic plant species was undertaken in 1983 and repeated in 2005 at the Desert Laboratory, a 352-ha natural area just west of downtown Tucson, Arizona, USA. Coordinate data gathered during the surveys were used to plot distributions, determine frequencies (number of coordinate locations), and assess percent change. Fifty-two exotic species were encountered in all, 34 in the first survey, 44 in the second. The proportion of ornamental exotics doubled over time, reaching 50% in 2005. Casual, naturalized, and invasive exotics comprised 44%, 40%, and 15% of species found during the surveys. Minimum residence time increased significantly from casual to naturalized to invasive species, suggesting...
Aim A regional analysis was used to explore the influence of river regulation on the dominance of non-native, invasive shrubs and trees. We addressed the following questions: (1) How do large dams affect hydrological parameters that influence riparian vegetation? (2) How do flow regimes affect the dominance of non-native woody species? (3) How do changes in flow regimes affect the dominance of non-native woody species? Location South-western USA. Methods We sampled the canopy cover of woody species on 179 point bars along seven non-dammed and thirteen dammed river segments. Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to determine differences between flow parameters in dammed and non-dammed rivers. We used correlation analyses...
Aim: A conspicuous climatic and biogeographical transition occurs at 40–45° N in western North America. This pivot point marks a north–south opposition of wet and dry conditions at interannual and decadal time-scales, as well as the northern and southern limits of many dominant western plant species. Palaeoecologists have yet to focus on past climatic and biotic shifts along this transition, in part because it requires comparisons across dissimilar records [i.e. pollen from lacustrine sediments to the north and plant macrofossils from woodrat (Neotoma) middens to the south]. To overcome these limitations, we are extending the woodrat-midden record northward into the lowlands of the central Rocky Mountains.
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Maps of invasive annual grasses were created using multi-season Landsat imagery over a 12 years period (2009-2020), and validated using an extensive network of plot data. Annual maps were used to identify persistent and productive populations of invasive annual grass, called hot spots, across entire Mojave Desert ecoregion. The data provided include a 12 band raster geospatial data file (.tiff) that represents classified early season invasive (ESI) grasses for each year from 2009-2020, and a single .tiff file of ESI hot spots made using the Getis-Ord Gi* Hot Spot classification method.


    map background search result map search result map Maps of early season invasive grasses and hot spots in the Mojave Ecoregion from 2009-2020 Maps of early season invasive grasses and hot spots in the Mojave Ecoregion from 2009-2020