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Sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.) were abundant in all of Utah's 29 counties at the time of European settlement wherever sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) occurred. Greater Sage-Grouse (G. urophasianus) inhabited areas north and west of the Colorado River, and Gunnison Sage-Grouse (G. minimus) occupied suitable habitat south and east of the Colorado River. The largest Greater Sage-Grouse populations in Utah are currently restricted to suitable habitats in Box Elder, Garfield, Rich, Uintah, and Wayne Counties. A remnant breeding population of Gunnison Sage-Grouse occurs in eastern San Juan County. We stratified Greater Sage-Grouse populations (1971-2000) by counties where the 1996 to 2000 moving average for estimated spring...
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Conclusions: Habitat changes resulting from timber harvest have altered the predator–prey balance leading to asymmetric predation affecting the survivial rates of endangered mountain caribou Thresholds/Learnings: As young forest stands increase in proportion to old forests, caribou population densities and survival rates decline as they become increasingly vulnerable to predation and extripation. Synopsis: Timber harvesting in areas of Mountain Caribou habitat have created landscapes of early seral forests. Such habitat changes have altered the predator–prey balance resulting in asymmetric predation in which predators are maintained by alternative prey (i.e. apparent competition). This study estimates survival...
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These heatmaps show a top 3 stressor or service, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor or service across the landscape. This map shows the percentage of participants from each county and municipality who ranked Discharge of Untreated Wastewater as a top 3 ecosystem stressor in the Riparian Habitat Fragmentation and Lossl category in their region. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas where they work were...
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Synopsis: Researchers measured the effects of grassland amount and fragmentation on upland and wetland songbird and duck densities and nest success across 16 landscapes in southern Alberta. By comparing these landscape-level effects with local-scale responses, including distance to various edges and vegetation characteristics, the study demonstrated that few species were in fact influenced by grassland amount or fragmentation. In contrast, distance to edge and local vegetation characteristics had significant effects on densities and nest success of many species. Landscape level effects were much less apparent when local characteristics were included in the models. Therefore, researchers concluded that local habitat...
Conclusions:Results indicated that system and species-specific considerations are important when assessing the potential outcome of habitat loss and fragmentation on regional biotaThresholds/Learnings:
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Probability of Development, Northeast U.S. is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org). Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit. This index represents the integrated probability of development occurring sometime between 2010 and 2030 at the 30 m cell level. It was based on models of historical patterns of urban growth in the Northeast, including the type (low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity), amount and spatial pattern of development, and incorporates the influence of factors such as geophysical conditions...
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Conclusions: The negative effects of patch size and isolation on species may not occur until the landscape consists of less than 10% suitable habitat for birds, and 30% suitable habitat for mammals. Thresholds/Learnings: The negative effects of patch size and isolation on species may not occur until the landscape consists of less than 10% suitable habitat for birds, and 30% suitable habitat for mammals. Synopsis: This study involved a review of studies on birds and mammals in habitat patches in landscapes with different proportions of suitable habitat. The findings demonstrate that there exists a threshold in proportion of suitable habitat in the landscape, above which fragmentation becomes pure habitat loss....
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Conclusions: Summarizes findings from a review of literature intended to identify critical thresholds for conservation based in empirical studies of landscape fragmentation. Presents a conceptual overview of landscape fragmentation and habitat loss, as well as guidelines and thresholds relating to landscape indicators such as patch size, habitat amount, edge effects, riparian buffers, and habitat connectivity. Thresholds/Learnings: Many. See Kennedy et al. 2003. Synopsis: This report summarizes findings from a review of literature intended to identify critical thresholds for conservation based in empirical studies of landscape fragmentation. In presenting a conceptual overview of landscape fragmentation and habitat...
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Percent of each terrestrial ecoregion's natural habitat that has been converted by humans. The data on the amount of habitat lost was derived from the Global Land Cover 2000 (JRC 2003), which is based on satellite imagery; the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (CIESIN et al. 2004); and a global coverage of roads and railroads compiled from ESRI Digital Chart of the World. While the data tell us how much land has been converted from a natural state to a human-altered state for 2000, it does not tell us about any specific type of habitat that has been lost, what it was converted to, how long ago it was converted, or the extent to which the human land use still supports some biodiversity. Because the satellite-derived...
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Probability of Development, Northeast U.S. is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org). Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit. This index represents the integrated probability of development occurring sometime between 2010 and 2080 at the 30 m cell level. It was based on models of historical patterns of urban growth in the Northeast, including the type (low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity), amount and spatial pattern of development, and incorporates the influence of factors such as geophysical conditions...
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These heatmaps show a top 3 stressor or service, as ranked by participants, and the concentration of participants who reported as working in each municipality or county who also voted for that stressor or service across the landscape. This map shows the percentage of participants from each county and municipality who ranked Pollution of Aquifers from mining and energy development as a top 3 ecosystem stressor in the Riparian Habitat Fragmentation and Lossl category in their region. Symbology represents the percentage of participants with 0% = dark green, 0.0001 % - 24.99% = light green, 25% - 49.99% = yellow, 50% - 74.99% = orange, 75% - 100% = red. All counties and municipalities identified by participants as areas...
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Percent of each terrestrial ecoregion's natural habitat that has been converted by humans. The data on the amount of habitat lost was derived from the Global Land Cover 2009 (JRC 2012), which is based on satellite imagery. While the data tell us how much land has been converted from a natural state to a human-altered state for 2009, it does not tell us about any specific type of habitat that has been lost, what it was converted to, how long ago it was converted, or the extent to which the human land use still supports some biodiversity. Because the satellite-derived data are observations made around 2009, they do not reflect ongoing rates of habitat loss. These data were derived by The Nature Conservancy, and were...


map background search result map search result map Changes in the distribution and status of sage-grouse in Utah Changes in landscape composition influence the decline of a threatened woodland caribou population Conservation Thresholds for Land Use Planners Effects of habitat fragmentation on birds and mammals in landscapes with different proportions of suitable habitat: a review. A multi-scale analysis of avian response to habitat amount and fragmentation in the Canadian dry mixed-grass prairie. Percent Habitat Loss by Terrestrial Ecoregion (2009) Percent Habitat Loss by Terrestrial Ecoregion 2000 Probability of Development, 2080, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Probability of Development, 2030, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Riparian - Habitat Fragmentation and Loss Stressors - Discharge of Untreated Wastewater Riparian - Habitat Fragmentation and Loss Stressors - Pollution of Aquifers (From Mining and Energy Development) A multi-scale analysis of avian response to habitat amount and fragmentation in the Canadian dry mixed-grass prairie. Changes in the distribution and status of sage-grouse in Utah Changes in landscape composition influence the decline of a threatened woodland caribou population Riparian - Habitat Fragmentation and Loss Stressors - Discharge of Untreated Wastewater Riparian - Habitat Fragmentation and Loss Stressors - Pollution of Aquifers (From Mining and Energy Development) Probability of Development, 2080, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Probability of Development, 2030, Version 3.1, Northeast U.S. Conservation Thresholds for Land Use Planners Percent Habitat Loss by Terrestrial Ecoregion 2000 Percent Habitat Loss by Terrestrial Ecoregion (2009) Effects of habitat fragmentation on birds and mammals in landscapes with different proportions of suitable habitat: a review.