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Records in this collection are classified into one of four categories that best characterizes the data contained within the borehole record. The classifications are: Geotechnical: Boreholes and pits created with the intent to gain a detailed understanding of the subsurface lithology and soil or rock properties therein. These records have additional data beyond lithologic descriptions including penetrometer resistance, shear and strength tests, density measurements, etc. Lithologic borings: Boreholes are drill solely for the purpose of identifying subsurface lithology. Material testing techniques were not used (or the results are not provided) to allow for a more detailed understanding of subsurface material properties....
Geologic, geologic hazard, and geotechnical reports submitted by county and municipal planners and school districts to the Colorado Geological Survey for review as part of land development applications.
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This 1:50,000 scale geologic map describes the distribution of unconsolidated deposits, identifies local geologic hazards, and provides information about the depositional environment and basic engineering properties of common surficial-geologic materials in and around Shaktoolik, Alaska. Map units are the result of combined field observations and aerial imagery interpretation. A suite of local ground observations were collected over a two-week period in July 2011 by a helicopter-supported team of DGGS geologists and collaborators. Field investigations included soil test pits, sample collection, soil and rock description, oblique aerial photography, and documentation of landscape morphology.
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This geologic map and preliminary cross sections of central and east Anchorage, Alaska, are based on previous mapping, limited new photointerpretation, and available subsurface data. Using PC-based Geographic Information System (GIS) software, the existing geologic map has been updated and simplified by adding recent fill deposits and combining units of similar genesis, composition, and age that are also recognizable in the subsurface. The GIS database consists of a USGS geologic map and over 4,000 geotechnical boreholes and water-well logs provided by numerous public and private sources. Geologic cross sections were developed by using GIS to project graphic lithologic logs into scaled vertical layouts along selected...
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In this report, we evaluate potential tsunami hazards for the southeastern Alaska community of Juneau and numerically model the extent of inundation from tsunami waves generated by tectonic and submarine landslide sources. We calibrate our tsunami model by numerically simulating the 2011 Tohoku tsunami at Juneau and comparing our results to instrument records. Analysis of calculated and observed water level dynamics for the 2011 event in Juneau reveals that the model underestimates the observed wave heights in the city by a factor of two, likely due to complex tsunami-tide interactions. We compensate for this numerical underestimation by doubling the coseismic slip of the hypothetical tsunami sources in our models....
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In 2022, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) New England Water Science Center, in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT), surveyed four transportation infrastructure sites with frequency-domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments and one site with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to aid traditional geotechnical site characterizations performed by NHDOT. Information about subsurface physical properties is typically obtained through the use of borings during geotechnical site characterizations. Geotechnical site investigations that also include geophysical surveys (such as the EMI and GPR methods) between borings help provide more thorough characterizations. Integrated analysis...
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This report presents the findings of a geologic and geotechnical evaluation of a landslide at the Yukon River bridge (the E.L. Patton Bridge). The Yukon River bridge landslide occurred in fall 2012 between approximately 375 and 575 feet west of the bridge. Although there was no damage to the bridge foundation, the landslide's close proximity to the bridge and concerns over additional failures prompted multiple evaluations, including landslide documentation, drainage assessments, and geotechnical studies. This report was prepared to convey the general characteristics of the rock mass, characteristics of rock discontinuities, and the geomorphic expression of the 2012 landslide in the vicinity of the bridge. We determined...


    map background search result map search result map Collection of boreholes and well logs from Washington State Simplified Geologic Map and Cross Sections of Central and East Anchorage, Alaska Yukon River bridge landslide: Preliminary geologic and geotechnical evaluation Surficial geologic map of the Shaktoolik area, Norton Bay Quadrangle, Alaska Tsunami inundation maps for Juneau, Alaska Cone penetrometer and elevation measurement data of coastal wetland plant states for resilience quantification, Louisiana, USA (2019) Electromagnetic Induction and Ground-Penetrating Radar Surveys at Transportation Infrastructure Sites in New Hampshire, 2022 Yukon River bridge landslide: Preliminary geologic and geotechnical evaluation Cone penetrometer and elevation measurement data of coastal wetland plant states for resilience quantification, Louisiana, USA (2019) Simplified Geologic Map and Cross Sections of Central and East Anchorage, Alaska Tsunami inundation maps for Juneau, Alaska Surficial geologic map of the Shaktoolik area, Norton Bay Quadrangle, Alaska Electromagnetic Induction and Ground-Penetrating Radar Surveys at Transportation Infrastructure Sites in New Hampshire, 2022 Collection of boreholes and well logs from Washington State