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Evapotranspiration determined using the energy-budget method at a semi-permanent prairie-pothole wetland in east-central North Dakota, USA was compared with 12 other commonly used methods. The Priestley-Taylor and deBruin-Keijman methods compared best with the energy-budget values; mean differences were less than 0.1 mm d−1, and standard deviations were less than 0.3 mm d−1. Both methods require measurement of air temperature, net radiation, and heat storage in the wetland water. The Penman, Jensen-Haise, and Brutsaert-Stricker methods provided the next-best values for evapotranspiration relative to the energy-budget method. The mass-transfer, deBruin, and Stephens-Stewart methods provided the worst comparisons;...
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Selected evapotranspiration data were collected from 7/5/2011 to 1/1/2017 at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS, https://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/) in support of ongoing research to improve the understanding of hydrologic and contaminant-transport processes in arid environments. The data presented in this data release includes 30-minute and daily evapotranspiration and associated energy-balance fluxes, precipitation, soil water content, air and soil temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, and photosynthetically active radiation. Data methods follow those described in Moreo and others (2017). This is the third in a series of three releases of evapotranspiration data, which has been measured continuously...
Evapotranspiration determined using the energy-budget method at a semi-permanent prairie-pothole wetland in east-central North Dakota, USA was compared with 12 other commonly used methods. The Priestley-Taylor and deBruin-Keijman methods compared best with the energy-budget values; mean differences were less than 0.1 mm d−1, and standard deviations were less than 0.3 mm d−1. Both methods require measurement of air temperature, net radiation, and heat storage in the wetland water. The Penman, Jensen-Haise, and Brutsaert-Stricker methods provided the next-best values for evapotranspiration relative to the energy-budget method. The mass-transfer, deBruin, and Stephens-Stewart methods provided the worst comparisons;...
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This U.S. Geological Survey data release presents monthly evaporation estimates from Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona. Data are updated approximately annually. The spreadsheet includes five worksheets: (1) Read_Me worksheet contains information relevant to understanding the data contained in the rest of the worksheets. (2) Monthly_EC_Met worksheet includes data measured at a land-based station (USGS site identification number 360500114465601) using primarily eddy covariance measurement methods: uncorrected evaporation, latent- and sensible-heat fluxes, net radiation, air temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity. Values are monthly averages computed by averaging daily values except as noted. Monthly values are...
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In cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation (Lower Colorado Region), the U.S. Geological Survey collected meteorological data from 4/22/2013 to 4/25/2017 at Lake Mead and 4/11/2013 to 9/30/2016 at Lake Mohave. Meteorological monitoring equipment were mounted to a floating platform located at each lake. The data presented in this data release includes 30-minute mean air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, water surface temperature, net radiation, and incoming solar radiation. Quality assurance consisted of (1) monthly site visits to inspect and clean sensors, (2) recalibrating each sensor as necessary according to manufacturer guidelines, and (3) manual and graphical analysis for out-of-range...
We review the sea-level and energy budgets together from 1961, using recent and updated estimates of all terms. From 1972 to 2008, the observed sea-level rise (1.8 ± 0.2 mm yr−1 from tide gauges alone and 2.1 ± 0.2 mm yr−1 from a combination of tide gauges and altimeter observations) agrees well with the sum of contributions (1.8 ± 0.4 mm yr−1) in magnitude and with both having similar increases in the rate of rise during the period. The largest contributions come from ocean thermal expansion (0.8 mm yr−1) and the melting of glaciers and ice caps (0.7 mm yr−1), with Greenland and Antarctica contributing about 0.4 mm yr−1. The cryospheric contributions increase through the period (particularly in the 1990s) but the...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: aerosol, energy budget, sea level


    map background search result map search result map Selected Evapotranspiration Data, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada, 7/5/2011-1/1/2017 Meteorological Data for Lake Mead and Lake Mohave, Nevada and Arizona, April 2013 to April 2017 Evaporation data from Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona Evaporation data from Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona Meteorological Data for Lake Mead and Lake Mohave, Nevada and Arizona, April 2013 to April 2017 Selected Evapotranspiration Data, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada, 7/5/2011-1/1/2017