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Conclusions:distance from edge and the habitat heterogeneity were the most important variables affecting bryophyte and lichen species richnessThresholds/Learnings:Temperature and light intensity decreased, and humidity increased up to 15m from the edge of fragments in the study.
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Synopsis: This paper summarizes significant findings from literature related to the effect of noise on wildlife, emphasizing the effects of road traffic noise on birds. Many studies from the United States and the Netherlands indicate that road noise has a negative effect on bird populations, particularly during breeding season in a variety of species. In this paper, ‘effect distances’—distances at which bird density decreases—are reported at a range of two to three thousand meters from the road. Effect distances tend to increase with traffic density, being the greatest near large, multilane highways. In a study of woodland species, 26 of 43 (60%) were found to show a decrease in population densities with effect...
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Synopsis: This study examined the effect of road improvement and environmental variables on exotic and native plant diversity in roadside verges and adjacent semi-arid grassland, shrubland, and woodland communities of southern Utah. Researchers measured the cover of exotic and native species in roadside verges and both the richness and cover of exotic and native species in adjacent interior communities (50 meters beyond the edge of the road) along 42 roads stratified by level of road improvement (paved, improved surface, graded, and four-wheel drive track). Exotic species richness and cover were more than 50% greater, and the richness of native species 30% lower, at patch interiors adjacent to paved roads than those...
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Conclusions: Edge structure affects movement patterns in chickadee flocks. Flocks tend to move parallel to forest edges. Thresholds/Learnings: Synopsis: During a two-year study of chickadee flocks in a fragmented agricultural landscape near Edmonton, Alberta, researchers tested the degree to which flocks responded to forest boundaries based on changes in vegetation, foraging sites, and edge structure near these boundaries. The results indicate that sharp forest boundaries (edges) acted strongly as movement corridors for birds, encouraging flocks to move parallel (within 75 m) to forest edges.
The soils across treeline should vary because of direct effects of biological differences of coniferous subalpine forest and the herbaceous alpine tundra in Colorado. In addition, the change in life form may indirectly affect soils because of interactions of the vegetation and wind-driven deposition processes. This is particularly important as nitrogen (N) saturation is a growing concern in high elevation ecosystems, and treeline is predicted to be a deposition hotspot. The vegetation transition at treeline provides an opportunity to test the effects of vegetation, topography, and external inputs on soils at three spatial scales. First, a regional evaluation of soils at eleven abrupt treeline sites was made comparing...
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Conclusions: Increasing seismic line density from 0 to 8 km/km2 resulted in a 38% decline and an 82% decline in bird abundance when individuals used lines as territory boundaries or avoided edges by 50 m, respectively. When tested with ovenbirds, male ovenbirds showed a distinct use of one side of the seismic line, suggesting lines acted as territory boundaries. Ovenbirds declined with seismic line density when a threshold seismic line density of 8.5 km/km2 was reached. Above the threshold, Ovenbirds declined 19% for each 1 km/km2 increase in seismic line density. Thresholds/Learnings: Synopsis: In the boreal plains of Alberta, Canada, energy sector exploration has resulted in extensive dissection of the landscape...


    map background search result map search result map Understanding avian responses to forest boundaries: a case study with chickadee winter flocks. Modeling and field-testing of Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) responses to boreal forest dissection by energy sector development at multiple spatial scales. Synthesis of noise effects on wildlife populations. Roads as conduits for exotic plant invasions in a semi-arid landscape. Understanding avian responses to forest boundaries: a case study with chickadee winter flocks. Roads as conduits for exotic plant invasions in a semi-arid landscape. Modeling and field-testing of Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus) responses to boreal forest dissection by energy sector development at multiple spatial scales. Synthesis of noise effects on wildlife populations.