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This map shows EPA Level IV ecoregions within the Sonoran Desert ecoregion. These data are provided by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) "as is" and may contain errors or omissions. The User assumes the entire risk associated with its use of these data and bears all responsibility in determining whether these data are fit for the User's intended use. These data may not have the accuracy, resolution, completeness, timeliness, or other characteristics appropriate for applications that potential users of the data may contemplate. The User is encouraged to carefully consider the content of the metadata file associated with these data. The BLM should be cited as the data source in any products derived from these data.
Note: A new version of these statistics based on PAD-US 2.0 will be made available in 2020 here. This summary of the Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US) is created to provide land managers and decision makers with a general summary of management for conservation, natural resource management and recreation. Area statistics include total acreage, acres by managing agency and percent protection. These summaries are available for the nation and by state. The PAD-US 1.4 Combined feature class (with Marine Protected Areas removed) was modified to remove overlaps, avoiding overestimation in protected area statistic summaries. A Python scripted process prioritized overlapping designations (for example,...
Types: Citation; Tags: Acreage, Acres, Agricultural Research Service, Alabama (AL), Alaska (AK), All tags...
Land facets were created by combining 3 rasters: elevation (seven 600-m bands), soil orders (11 classes) and slope (3 breaks) to produce a 270-m resolution grid. 162 land facets were created, ranging in size from over 9 million hectares in the plateaus of the Columbia Plateau to less than 1,000 hectares in steep, high elevation habitats. These 162 facets were stratified by ecoregions to produce 794 ecofacets which underlie the spatial distribution of biodiversity and the region’s biological richness. Soil Order: Soil orders reflect both geology and time and are based largely on soil forming processes, including exposure to climatic factors and biological processes, as indicated by the presence or absence of major...
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Major ecosystems have been mapped and described for the State of Alaska and nearby areas. Ecoregion units are based on newly available datasets and field experience of ecologists, biologists, geologists and regional experts. Recently derived datasets for Alaska included climate parameters, vegetation, surficial geology and topography. Additional datasets incorporated in the mapping process were lithology, soils, permafrost, hydrography, fire regime and glaciation. Thirty two units are mapped using a combination of the approaches of Bailey (hierarchial), and Omernick (integrated). The ecoregions are grouped into two higher levels using a "tri-archy" based on climate parameters, vegetation response and disturbance...
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The Yukon River Lowlands, Kuskokwim Mountains, and Lime Hills were selected by BLM for a Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA). These three ecoregions form the basis for the REA study area and were derived from the Unified Ecoregions of Alaska (Nowacki et al. 2001). Major ecosystems have been mapped and described for the State of Alaska and nearby areas. Ecoregion units are based on newly available datasets and field experience of ecologists, biologists, geologists and regional experts. Recently derived datasets for Alaska included climate parameters, vegetation, surficial geology and topography. Additional datasets incorporated in the mapping process were lithology, soils, permafrost, hydrography, fire regime and...
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**Symbology has been adjusted by the Open Space Institute from The Nature Conservancy's original "Geophysical Settings, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada" dataset.** The geophysical settings are defined by their physical properties – geology, soil, and elevation - that correspond to differences in the flora and fauna they support. They also differ in ecological character, in their value for agriculture or mining, and how they have been developed by people. For example, the region’s high granite mountains are both largely intact and topographically complex, whereas low coastal sandplains are both more fragmented and relatively flat. The geophyical settings classification enabled us to compare resilience characteristics...
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In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental...
This map shows the location of EPA Level IV Ecoregions in the Colorado Plateau Ecoregion.
This map depicts the density of "More Resilient" cells (defined as the top two quintiles from the stratified resilience dataset) within a 3-km radius of every cell. This provides important additional context when making land protection or restoration decisions. Cells with higher density values are embedded in a larger resilient landscape. These areas are more likely to support biodiversity and ecological function over time in a changing climate. To quantify resilience at the landscape scale, we used a density function, where all cells classified in the final top two resilience quintiles were included in the density calculations, regardless of their underlying Ecofacet, and all other cells were ignored. Looking...
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This data release provides output produced by a statistical, aridity threshold fire model for 11 extensively forested ecoregions in the western United States. We identified thresholds in fire-season climate water deficit (FSCWD) that distinguish years with limited, moderate, and extensive area burned for each ecoregion. We developed a new area burned model using these relationships and used it to simulate annual area burned using historical climate from 1980 - 2020 and output from global climate models (GCMs) from 1980 - 2099. The data release includes a comparison of mean annual FSCWD for 13 GCMs that we used to select five GCMs that bracket the range of conditions projected for the RCP 8.5 emissions scenario....
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Ecoregions are based on perceived patterns of a combination of causal and integrative factors including land use, land surface form, potential natural vegetation, and soils (Omernik, 1987).
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Landscape level stratification of ecoregions in the Blue Mountain study area. Study area was defined by watershed boundaries because the pathways and distribution of anadromous fish and determined by watershed linkages and landscape characteristics.
Increasing pressures from land use coupled with future changes in climate will present unique challenges for California’s protected areas. We assessed the potential for future land use conversion on land surrounding existing protected areas in California’s twelve ecoregions, utilizing annual, spatially explicit (250 m) scenario projections of land use for 2006–2100 based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emission Scenarios to examine future changes in development, agriculture, and logging. We calculated a conversion threat index (CTI) for each unprotected pixel, combining land use conversion potential with proximity to protected area boundaries, in order to identify ecoregions and...
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These data identify the mean population growth rate and ratio change in abundance of common raven (Corvus corax; ravens) populations from 1966 through 2018, delineated by ecoregions defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This enables researchers and land managers to identify regions which may be more heavily affected by growing raven populations. These data support the following publication: Harju, S.M., Coates, P.S., Dettenmaier, S.J., Dinkins, J.B., Jackson, P.J. and Chenaille, M.P., 2022. Estimating trends of common raven populations in North America, 1966–2018. Human–Wildlife Interactions, 15(3), p.5. https://doi.org/10.26077/c27f-e335
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The second edition of "Ecoregions of Montana" (2002) revises many ecoregion polygon assignments that appeared in the first edition (Woods and others, 1999). These changes were made after research in Idaho (McGrath and others, 2002) recognized the Idaho Batholith as a separate level III ecoregion (Ecoregion 16), limited the Northern Rockies (15) to strongly marine-influenced areas, and transferred the Montana Valley and Foothill Prairies (formerly Ecoregion 16) to another level III ecoregion, the Middle Rockies (17). The second edition also modifies a few level IV ecoregion lines along Montana's western border so that ecoregions shared by Montana and Idaho will edge match. In addition, it updates ecoregion...
Permeability refers to the degree to which a landscape sustains ecological processes and supports movement of many species by virtue of the structural connectedness of its natural systems (Meiklejohn et al 2010). We used resistant kernel analysis (Compton et al. 2007) to map permeability as a focal statistic based on the resistance data from the terrestrial condition dataset. The analysis evaluates the capacity for ecological flow outward from each focal cell into its local neighborhood up to a maximum of 3-km, then combines the results into a final, study-wide surface. Perm_Score: Our permeability analysis evaluates the connectivity of a focal cell to its ecological neighborhood when the cell is viewed as a source;...


map background search result map search result map Ecoregions of Montana Colorado Plateau REA EPA Level IV Ecoregions Landscape-level ecoregions for seven contiguous watersheds, Northeast Oregon and Southeast Washington Aquatic Ecoregions of the Conterminous United States Study Boundary for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment Geophysical Settings, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada BLM REA YKL 2011 Yukon River Lowlands - Kuskokwim Mountains - Lime Hills BLM REA YKL 2011 Ecoregions of Alaska and Neighboring Territory BLM REA SOD 2010 EPA LevelIV Ecoregions Trend Estimates of Common Raven Populations in the United States and Canada, 1966 - 2018 Mean Annual Population Growth Rate and Ratio Change in Abundance of Common Raven within Level I Ecoregions of the United States and Canada, 1966 - 2018 Mean Annual Population Growth Rate and Ratio Change in Abundance of Common Raven within Level II Ecoregions of the United States and Canada, 1966 - 2018 Simulated annual area burned for eleven extensively forested ecoregions in the western United States for 1980 - 2099 Landscape-level ecoregions for seven contiguous watersheds, Northeast Oregon and Southeast Washington Colorado Plateau REA EPA Level IV Ecoregions BLM REA SOD 2010 EPA LevelIV Ecoregions Ecoregions of Montana BLM REA YKL 2011 Yukon River Lowlands - Kuskokwim Mountains - Lime Hills Study Boundary for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment Simulated annual area burned for eleven extensively forested ecoregions in the western United States for 1980 - 2099 BLM REA YKL 2011 Ecoregions of Alaska and Neighboring Territory Geophysical Settings, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada Aquatic Ecoregions of the Conterminous United States Trend Estimates of Common Raven Populations in the United States and Canada, 1966 - 2018 Mean Annual Population Growth Rate and Ratio Change in Abundance of Common Raven within Level I Ecoregions of the United States and Canada, 1966 - 2018 Mean Annual Population Growth Rate and Ratio Change in Abundance of Common Raven within Level II Ecoregions of the United States and Canada, 1966 - 2018