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This online database (https://www.streamcontinuity.org/cdb2/naacc_search_crossing.cfm) serves as a common repository for road-stream crossing assessment data assembled by the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC). Both a network of partners and a source of shared resources, the NAACC offers a collaborative framework for taking on the critical task of assessing and upgrading the hundreds of thousands of outdated road-stream crossings across the region that represent barriers to wildlife movement and pose flooding risks to communities. The NAACC offers training in standard protocols for conducting assessments, online tools for prioritizing upgrades based on ecological benefits, and this database...
This document is the final report of the project that initiated the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC), funded by the North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperatuive (LCC). Contents consist of:IntroductionProject Overview and StructureDeveloping a Regional Road-Stream Crossing Assessment ProtocolPrioritizing for Field SurveysDatabase and Data CollectionData Quality and TrainingClassification and Scoring SystemsNAACC Regional NetworkNext StepsQuarterly Progress Report: Summary by TaskReferencesAcknowledgmentsAppendices
Habitat fragmentation is an important cause of biodiversity loss in freshwater systems, as worldwide rivers have been fragmented by dams and other hydraulic structures. To restore freshwater fish populations, some barriers have been removed, but the long-term ecological effects of this removal have been rarely quantified. In the present study, we quantified the effects of barrier removal on river colonization by anadromous sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) by analyzing the spatial distribution and nest density in a small coastal river (France) from 1994 to 2011. Our results demonstrated the benefit of dam removal within few years after restoration. Indeed, the spatial distribution of nests shifted significantly upstream...