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The desert bighorn sheep mountain habitat data provided by  Diane Mastalir (California Department of Fish and Wildlife) is intended to identify historic, current, and potential core habitat for desert bighorn sheep in California (excluding the Peninsular bighorn sheep).This layer represents mountain habitat with a slope of 15% or greater. It was created using a NED 30 meter resolution DEM clipped to the study area. Slope of 15% or greater was extracted from the 30 meter DEM. A conditional evaluation was performed on the image giving the output cell a value of 1.This dataset was resampled from 30m to 270m resolution by Conservation Biology Institute and generalized using majority filter and boundary clean techniques....
The responses of individual species to environmental changes can be manifested at multiple levels that range from individual-level (i.e., behavioral responses) to population-level (i.e., demographic) impacts. Major environmental changes that ultimately result in population level impacts are often first detected as individual-level responses. For example, herbivores respond to limited forage availability during drought periods by increasing the duration of foraging periods and expanding home range areas to compensate for the reduction in forage. However, if the individual-level responses are not sufficient to compensate for reduced forage availability, reduced survival and reproductive rates may result. We studied...
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This group layer consists of two datasets which jointly describe Desert bighorn sheep (excluding the Peninsular Bighorn Sheep) habitat within the DRECP study area. Data were provided for upload by Diane Mastalir (California Department of Fish and Wildlife). A summary of each dataset is provided below. Refer to the individual layer descriptions for additional information on each dataset. Desert Bighorn Sheep Mountain Habitat in California This layer is intended to identify historic, current, and potential core habitat for desert bighorn sheep in California. California Desert Bighorn Sheep Intermountain Habitat:Â This layer represents intermountain, lower slope, valley bottom habitat used by desert bighorn...
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This data product contains estimates of habitat connectivity for desert bighorn sheep. The analysis area was a 236,000 square kilometers that encompassed the Navajo Nation, which includes portions of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The estimates of habitat quality were created with spatially explicit habitat variables and either an expert-based linear combination process (for mountain lion and mule deer) or a generalized linear mixed model-based estimation that used radio-collar telemetry data (for desert bighorn sheep, black bear, and pronghorn; collected between 2005-2011). Habitat variables varied among species but included vegetation type, terrain ruggedness, topographic position index (TPI), road density, distance...
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This data product contains estimates of habitat quality and connectivity for mountain lion, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, and black bear, and combined estimates of high habitat and connectivity areas for all species. The analysis area was a 236,000 square kilometers that encompassed the Navajo Nation, which includes portions of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The estimates of habitat quality were created with spatially explicit habitat variables and either an expert-based linear combination process (for mountain lion and mule deer) or a generalized linear mixed model-based estimation that used radio-collar telemetry data (for desert bighorn sheep, black bear, and pronghorn; collected between 2005-2011). Habitat...
The responses of individual species to environmental changes can be manifested at multiple levels that range from individual-level (i.e., behavioral responses) to population-level (i.e., demographic) impacts. Major environmental changes that ultimately result in population level impacts are often first detected as individual-level responses. For example, herbivores respond to limited forage availability during drought periods by increasing the duration of foraging periods and expanding home range areas to compensate for the reduction in forage. However, if the individual-level responses are not sufficient to compensate for reduced forage availability, reduced survival and reproductive rates may result. We studied...
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This map contains:Terrestrial Intactness results for the State of Utah and the Colorado Plateau Ecoregion, 1 km resolution.Terrestrial Species Intactness results clipped to 15 different species' distributions, showing the TI status/condition for each species of interest in the COP.These datasets provide an estimate of current terrestrial intactness (i.e. condition) based on the extent to which human impacts such as agriculture, urban development, natural resource extraction, and invasive species have disrupted the landscape across the State of Utah and the Colorado Plateau Ecoregion. Terrestrial intactness values will be high in areas where these impacts are low.Documentation of model structure and input data and...
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mammal species, this map shows their current and near-term status within the ecoregion. Current, long-term, and summary bioclimate data is also include for several of these mammal species. The input datasets used in the distribution model are also included. These data are provided by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) "as is" and may contain errors or omissions. The User assumes the entire risk associated with its use of these data and bears all responsibility in determining whether these data are fit for the User's intended use. These data may not have the accuracy, resolution, completeness, timeliness, or other characteristics appropriate for applications that potential users of the data may contemplate. The User...
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This map shows the potential current distribution of desert bighorn sheep, in the context of current and near-term terrestrial intactness and long-term potential for climate change and energy development.
Natural selection may result in local adaptation to different environmental conditions across the range of a species. Understanding local adaptation, in turn, informs management decisions such as translocation to restore locally-extinct populations. We used a landscape genomics approach to detect genetic signatures of selection related to climatic variation among desert bighorn sheep populations across their indigenous range in the western United States. This approach allowed us to investigate broad patterns of both neutral and adaptive genetic variation across very different environments. Analyses suggested that ancestry and isolation by distance were the most significant forces driving genetic variation in desert...
The responses of individual species to environmental changes can be manifested at multiple levels that range from individual-level (i.e., behavioral responses) to population-level (i.e., demographic) impacts. Major environmental changes that ultimately result in population level impacts are often first detected as individual-level responses. For example, herbivores respond to limited forage availability during drought periods by increasing the duration of foraging periods and expanding home range areas to compensate for the reduction in forage. However, if the individual-level responses are not sufficient to compensate for reduced forage availability, reduced survival and reproductive rates may result. We studied...
Human recreation has been implicated in the decline of several populations of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni). Managers are concerned about the impact of increased recreation on desert bighorn sheep in Canyonlands National Park (NP), Utah, USA, where visitation increased 325% from 1979 to 1994. We compared behavioral responses of sheep to recreational activity between a low visitor use area and a high visitor use area during 1993 and 1994 by observing behavioral responses, distances moved, and duration of responses to vehicles, mountain bikers, and humans on foot. Hikers caused the most severe responses in desert bighorn sheep (animals fled in 61% of encounters), followed by vehicles (17% fled) and...
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Ecological Status Assessment - full for the Desert Bighorn Sheep species conservation element (CE). These data are provided by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) "as is" and may contain errors or omissions. The User assumes the entire risk associated with its use of these data and bears all responsibility in determining whether these data are fit for the User's intended use. These data may not have the accuracy, resolution, completeness, timeliness, or other characteristics appropriate for applications that potential users of the data may contemplate. The User is encouraged to carefully consider the content of the metadata file associated with these data. The BLM should be cited as the data source in any products derived...
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Natural selection may result in local adaptation to different environmental conditions across the range of a species. Understanding local adaptation, in turn, informs management decisions such as translocation to restore locally-extinct populations. We used a landscape genomics approach to detect genetic signatures of selection related to climatic variation among desert bighorn sheep populations across their indigenous range in the western United States. This approach allowed us to investigate broad patterns of both neutral and adaptive genetic variation across very different environments. Analyses suggested that ancestry and isolation by distance were the most significant forces driving genetic variation in desert...
Human recreation has been implicated in the decline of several populations of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni). Managers are concerned about the impact of increased recreation on desert bighorn sheep in Canyonlands National Park (NP), Utah, USA, where visitation increased 325% from 1979 to 1994. We compared behavioral responses of sheep to recreational activity between a low visitor use area and a high visitor use area during 1993 and 1994 by observing behavioral responses, distances moved, and duration of responses to vehicles, mountain bikers, and humans on foot. Hikers caused the most severe responses in desert bighorn sheep (animals fled in 61% of encounters), followed by vehicles (17% fled) and...
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This data product contains estimates of habitat quality and connectivity for mountain lion, mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, and black bear, and combined estimates of high habitat and connectivity areas for all species. The analysis area was a 236,000 square kilometers that encompassed the Navajo Nation, which includes portions of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The estimates of habitat quality were created with spatially explicit habitat variables and either an expert-based linear combination process (for mountain lion and mule deer) or a generalized linear mixed model-based estimation that used radio-collar telemetry data (for desert bighorn sheep, black bear, and pronghorn; collected between 2005-2011). Habitat...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Antilocapra americana, Antilocapra americana, Arizona, Arizona, EARTH SCIENCE > LAND SURFACE > LANDSCAPE, All tags...
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This map shows the current predicted distribution of Desert Bighorn Sheep, along with current and near-term status and long term potential for change. These data are provided by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) "as is" and may contain errors or omissions. The User assumes the entire risk associated with its use of these data and bears all responsibility in determining whether these data are fit for the User's intended use. These data may not have the accuracy, resolution, completeness, timeliness, or other characteristics appropriate for applications that potential users of the data may contemplate. The User is encouraged to carefully consider the content of the metadata file associated with these data. The BLM should...
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Natural selection may result in local adaptation to different environmental conditions across the range of a species. Understanding local adaptation, in turn, informs management decisions such as translocation to restore locally-extinct populations. We used a landscape genomics approach to detect genetic signatures of selection related to climatic variation among desert bighorn sheep populations across their indigenous range in the western United States. This approach allowed us to investigate broad patterns of both neutral and adaptive genetic variation across very different environments. Analyses suggested that ancestry and isolation by distance were the most significant forces driving genetic variation in desert...
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This dataset represents current terrestrial intactness values (estimated at the 1km level) within the modeled distribution of the Desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis).Terrestrial intactness is high in areas where development is low, vegetation intactness is high, and fragmentation is low. Consequently, this dataset serves as a general* indication of habitat quality within the distribution of this conservation element. Estimates of current terrestrial intactness were generated by an EEMS fuzzy logic model that integrates multiple measures of landscape development and vegetation intactness, including agriculture development (from LANDFIRE EVT v1.1), urban development (from LANDFIRE EVT v1.1 and NLCD Impervious Surfaces),...
Estimation of connectivity for multiple species could increase the efficiency of resource management and elucidate trade-offs among maintenance of connectivity for different taxa. We identified potential areas of high connectivity for 5 species of mammals on the Navajo Nation and adjacent lands in Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, USA: mountain lion (Puma concolor), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), American black bear (Ursus americanus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana). These species were identified by the Navajo Nation as relevant to the benefit of their present and future generations. We used telemetry data to calculate utilization distributions, derive model...


map background search result map search result map Desert Bighorn Sheep - Species Distribution Model, DRECP Desert bighorn sheep - Habitat Intactness, DRECP Desert Bighorn Sheep - Intermountain & Unfiltered Core Habitat, DRECP Colorado Plateau REA Conservation Elements - Terrestrial Species: Desert Bighorn Sheep Bighorn Sheep Habitat Connectivity SRLCC_2011_Fleishman_NavajoNationConnectivity_Data Metadata Evaluating Adaptive Capacity of Desert Bighorn Sheep to Climate Change: Identifying Genetic to Climate Adaptations in Native and Reintroduced Populations-SNP Matrix Evaluating Adaptive Capacity of Desert Bighorn Sheep to Climate Change: Identifying Genetic to Climate Adaptations in Native and Reintroduced Populations-Major Allele Frequency by Population BLM REA CBR 2010 Terrestrial Species Mammals Status - Desert Bighorn Sheep BLM REA SOD 2010 TS 180711 Desert Bighorn Sheep 1KM 4KM BLM REA MAR 2012 Madrean Terrestrial Species - Ecological Status Assessment -  180711 Desert Bighorn Sheep BLM REA COP 2014 UCS COP Terrestrial Intactness  180711 Desert Bighorn Sheep SRLCC_2011_Fleishman_NavajoNationConnectivity_Data Metadata Bighorn Sheep Habitat Connectivity Desert bighorn sheep - Habitat Intactness, DRECP Desert Bighorn Sheep - Intermountain & Unfiltered Core Habitat, DRECP Evaluating Adaptive Capacity of Desert Bighorn Sheep to Climate Change: Identifying Genetic to Climate Adaptations in Native and Reintroduced Populations-SNP Matrix Evaluating Adaptive Capacity of Desert Bighorn Sheep to Climate Change: Identifying Genetic to Climate Adaptations in Native and Reintroduced Populations-Major Allele Frequency by Population Desert Bighorn Sheep - Species Distribution Model, DRECP Colorado Plateau REA Conservation Elements - Terrestrial Species: Desert Bighorn Sheep BLM REA SOD 2010 TS 180711 Desert Bighorn Sheep 1KM 4KM BLM REA COP 2014 UCS COP Terrestrial Intactness  180711 Desert Bighorn Sheep BLM REA MAR 2012 Madrean Terrestrial Species - Ecological Status Assessment -  180711 Desert Bighorn Sheep BLM REA CBR 2010 Terrestrial Species Mammals Status - Desert Bighorn Sheep