Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: coastal development (X)

15 results (109ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
To capture cumulative threat in a given location, the four threats in the Reefs at Risk Caribbean analysis - coastal development, marine-based, sedimentation and overfishing - were integrated into a single index - the Reefs at Risk Threat Index.
thumbnail
To capture cumulative threat in a given location, the four threats in the Reefs at Risk Caribbean analysis - coastal development, marine-based, sedimentation and overfishing - were integrated into a single index - the Reefs at Risk Threat Index.
thumbnail
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
thumbnail
To capture cumulative threat in a given location, the four threats in the Reefs at Risk Caribbean analysis - coastal development, marine-based, sedimentation and overfishing - were integrated into a single index - the Reefs at Risk Threat Index. A 100 m resolution GRID reflecting coral reef locations was classifed by this threat index, which was then converted to points for display.
thumbnail
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
thumbnail
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
thumbnail
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
thumbnail
Reef polygons classified by estimated threat from coastal development. The threat to coral reefs from coastal development was modeled based on size of cities, ports, and airports; size and density of hotels; and coastal population pressure (a combination of population density, growth, and tourism growth). Values of 0 indicate low threat, 100 indicate medium threat, 1000 indicate high threat.
thumbnail
In the next 100 years, accelerated sea-level rise (SLR) and urbanization will greatly modify coastal landscapes across the globe. More than one-half of coastal wetlands in the contiguous United States are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. In addition to supporting fish and wildlife habitat, these highly productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services including storm protection, recreation, clean water, and carbon sequestration. Historically, tidal saline wetlands (TSWs) have adapted to sea-level fluctuations through lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, some TSWs will adapt and migrate landward in undeveloped low-lying areas where migration corridors...
thumbnail
Percent of coastline densely populated, by marine ecoregion. The map shows the proportion of coastline (from the shore to within five kilometers of the coast) in each ecoregion where there are more than five hundred persons per square kilometer. By focusing attention on a narrow coastal strip, we believe that we are capturing areas with the highest likelihood of significant losses of intertidal and adjacent habitats as a result of building, dredging, land reclamation, and other forms of coastal engineering. It does not, of course, measure areas of coastal development per se and does not capture areas where aquaculture, agriculture, or low-density tourism have impacts. These data were derived by The Nature Conservancy,...


    map background search result map search result map Percent of Coast Densely Populated by Marine Ecoregion Coral reefs classified by coastal development threat, 2011 Caribbean Reefs at Risk Threat Index (polygon) Mesoamerica Integrated Threats to Coral Reefs (points) Caribbean Reefs at Risk Index (points) Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2030 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2040 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2050 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2100 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2060 Mesoamerica Integrated Threats to Coral Reefs (points) Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2030 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2040 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2050 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2100 Data_Series_969_Tidal_Saline_Wetland_Migration_2060 Caribbean Reefs at Risk Index (points) Caribbean Reefs at Risk Threat Index (polygon) Coral reefs classified by coastal development threat, 2011 Percent of Coast Densely Populated by Marine Ecoregion