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This dataset contains mercury concentrations and locations of wintering red-legged kittiwakes in the western subartic Pacific Ocean. These data support the following publication: Fleishman, AB, RA Orben, N Kokubun, A Will, R Paredes, JT Ackerman, A Takahashi, AS Kitaysky, and SA Shaffer. 2019. Wintering in the Western Subarctic Pacific increases mercury contamination of red-legged kittiwakes. Environmental Science and Technology, in press.
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The Conservation Opportunity Areas (COAs) for Tennessee capture populations of GCN species and high quality habitats, and as appropriate, define the geographically relevant framework for achieving conservation outcomes. The COAs currently designed for Tennessee are large geographies, with the expectation that further prioritization and goal setting for specific habitat outcomes can be achieved within them through collaborations with partners on shared objectives. While designing the COAs for Tennessee, the planning team considered three major attributes: GCN habitat priority, the problems affecting the habitats, and the on-the-ground opportunities to implement conservation actions.
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We documented the occurrence of eight rare passerines in central Alaska. Our observations of the Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Arctic Warbler, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Tennessee Warbler, Palm Warbler, Mourning Warbler, and Clay-colored Sparrow provided new distributional information on the occurrence of these species in central Alaska. Mist netting [not a spray, just a light net] was essential to documenting the geographic distribution of these species because mist-net captures represented the only occurrence of several species. Additionally, many of these records could not have been identified to subspecies without collecting individuals as voucher specimens that could be verified by other scientists.
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In 2011 through 2013, when nests were found, notes were kept on whether it held eggs or hatchlings at the time of discovery, and how it was found. Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus (commonly referred to as the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow) occurs in the desert and plains grasslands of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although a subspecies of conservation concern, this data was produced as part of the first intensive study of its life history and breeding ecology, providing baseline data and facilitating comparisons with other North American Grasshopper Sparrow subspecies. This study is described in the publication listed in the larger work citation of this metadata record.


map background search result map search result map Updated geographic distribution of eight passerine species in central Alaska Tennessee Conservation Opportunity Areas How nests found Arizona 2011-2013 How nests found Arizona 2011-2013 Updated geographic distribution of eight passerine species in central Alaska Tennessee Conservation Opportunity Areas