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In this paper part of an investigation is described into risks for climate change which are presently not adequately covered in General Circulation Models. The investigation included the interaction with biogeochemical cycles, the effects of clouds and aerosols, ice flow instability, albedo instability and modified ocean circulation. In this paper our results for clouds and aerosols and for biogeochemical cycles are reported.
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through...
In this project on future sustainable transport alternatives a two-step search process has been followed. First an analysis of critical success and failure factors of new technological options in passenger transport is made. These factors are found in the spatial, institutional, economic and social/psychological environment of the transport system. Next, systematically structured and expert based scenarios are con- structed in order to achieve a sustainable transport system in the year 2030 in which possible, expected and desired developments in the distinct fields are analyzed. Finally some policy conclusions are drawn.
In this project on future sustainable transport alternatives a two-step search process has been followed. First an analysis of critical success and failure factors of new technological options in passenger transport is made. These factors are found in the spatial, institutional, economic and social/psychological environment of the transport system. Next, systematically structured and expert based scenarios are con- structed in order to achieve a sustainable transport system in the year 2030 in which possible, expected and desired developments in the distinct fields are analyzed. Finally some policy conclusions are drawn.
In this project on future sustainable transport alternatives a two-step search process has been followed. First an analysis of critical success and failure factors of new technological options in passenger transport is made. These factors are found in the spatial, institutional, economic and social/psychological environment of the transport system. Next, systematically structured and expert based scenarios are con- structed in order to achieve a sustainable transport system in the year 2030 in which possible, expected and desired developments in the distinct fields are analyzed. Finally some policy conclusions are drawn.
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through...


    map background search result map search result map Simulated potential PNW vegetation for the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under the Hadley CM3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under CSIRO Mk3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under MIROC 3.2 medres general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under MIROC 3.2 medres general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation for the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under the Hadley CM3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under CSIRO Mk3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation for the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under the Hadley CM3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under CSIRO Mk3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under MIROC 3.2 medres general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under MIROC 3.2 medres general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation for the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under the Hadley CM3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model Simulated potential PNW vegetation the Western 2/3 of Oregon and Washington under CSIRO Mk3 general circulation model run with the A2 SRES emission scenario (2070-2099 mode) using the MC1 dynamic global vegetation model