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Handwritten notes on back of photo: C.H. Birdseye, E.C. LaRue, Herman Stabler. ca. 1924. no. 36177 Stamped on back of photo: Reproduced from the Collection of the Library of Congress. Caption: La Rue, Birdseye, and Stabler standing near the Grand in front of the Interior Building, Washington, D.C., January 12, 1924, obtained from page 243 in Boyer, D., Webb, R., & Collier, M. (2007). Aftermath: Politics and the Strident Hydraulic Engineer. In Damming Grand Canyon: The 1923 USGS Colorado River Expedition (pp. 242-278). University Press of Colorado. doi:10.2307/j.ctt4cgqhx.13
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Handwritten notes on album caption: S.J. Kubel, H.G. Kubel. 2/21/17. Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
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Handwritten names on album caption: Vogel, Diane, Mohler, Ferher. Mar 10/17 Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
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Portrait information: J.S. Diller, geologist, at his desk in office at 1330 F. Street. Spring of 1915.
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Album and index card caption: U.S. Geological Survey's DC-3 "flying laboratory" used in aeromagnetic surveys. Making ready for flight at the National Airport. Washington, D.C. 1960. Portion published as the upper left photograph on page 35, in the U.S. Geological Survey Unnumbered Series, Images of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1879-1979.
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U.S. Geological Survey library. Left to right: J.M. Nickles, J.L.V. McCord, J.E. Latimer, and Mary Coats. Washington, D.C. 1917. Index card: USGS Library. Interior Building. Hooe Building. Note the rotating bookcase at left next to card catalogs.
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Handwritten names on album caption: Blackburn, Burkland (sp?). Feb 14/17. Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
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Handwritten names on album caption: Birdseye (behind desk) and Corbett. Feb. 16/17. Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C
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Handwritten names on album caption: Roal (sp?), Hess, Gamble. Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
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Fore limb bones of Hoplophoneus primaevus latidens Thorpe. U.S. National Museum. Washington, DC. Plate 29, in U.S.Geological Survey Professional paper 221-H. 1950
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Handwritten names on album caption: Gerardi, H.T. Knight, Otterback, Burrarks. Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
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Album caption and index card: Alice D. Weeks, Geologist, estimating the mineral grain composition of a rock thin section with the integrating stage. Rapid Rock Analysis Laboratory, Geologic Division, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C. 1958.
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Handwritten name on album caption: Herron. Feb. 16/17. Note: In 1917, the USGS offices were located in the Adams Building, 1333-1335 F. Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
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These data were released prior to the October 1, 2016 effective date for the USGS’s policy dictating the review, approval, and release of scientific data as referenced in USGS Survey Manual Chapter 502.8 Fundamental Science Practices: Review and Approval of Scientific Data for Release. The hydrogeologic framework was developed from a combination of the physiography and the predominant texture of surficial geologic units in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. It describes the primary natural physical factors that affect the flow and chemistry of shallow ground water and small streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Seven hydrogeologic subregions were defined. Some of the subregions correspond directly to the physiographic...
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Album caption and index card: Morphology of a crystal of colemanite, CaB3O4 (OH) 3.H2O, being studied with a two-circle optical goniometer by Joan R. Clark. The crystal is mounted on a goniometer head on the vertical circle at the left, the horizontal circle is at the bottom of the instrument, a light source is at the back, right, and the optical system is in the center of the picture. By rotating the crystal around the axis of either the vertical or the horizontal circle it is brought into position to reflect light from the crystal faces at given angles. The reflections can be observed through the optical system, their angular readings recorded, and hence the angles between various crystal faces can be measured....
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Henry Faul, geophysicist, adjusting a sample of biotite at the focal point of a mass spectrometer. Nuecleonics Laboratory, Geologic Division, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C. 1958. Upper right photograph page 36, Images of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1879-1979.
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These data were released prior to the October 1, 2016 effective date for the USGS’s policy dictating the review, approval, and release of scientific data as referenced in USGS Survey Manual Chapter 502.8 Fundamental Science Practices: Review and Approval of Scientific Data for Release. These data sets represent 23 geographic 5-minute indexes for the counties of Maryland, one 2 1/2-minute index for Washington D.C., and 1-mile square index for Baltimore City. There are 25 vector polygon data sets covered by this metadata report.
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M. Grace Wilmarth compiling data for a lexicon of stratigraphic names, Hooe Building, Washington, D.C. c. 1917. Upper right photograph on page 12 , Images of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1879-1979.


map background search result map search result map U.S. Geological Survey library. Hooe Building, Washington, D.C. 1917. DC-3 used in aeromagnetic surveys. National Airport. Washington, D.C. 1960. Rock Creek Park, Washington, District of Columbia. Ford in the park. 1913. Eugene Clyde La Rue, Claude H. Birdseye, and Herman Stabler standing by the Grand. Washington, D.C. 1924. USGS employees, Adams Building, Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. circa 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees. Adams Building, Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees and presses, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. Alice Dowse Weeks, Geologist, estimating the mineral grain composition of a rock thin section. Rapid Rock Analysis Laboratory, USGS Geologic Division. Washington, D.C. 1958. Groundwater Site Identification Indexes for Washington D.C., Baltimore City, and the Counties of Maryland A Surficial Hydrogeologic Framework for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain Recommendations of Subgroup on Surface Physics: Agenda for Adhoc Apollo Group Meeting - 19 May 1962 Recommendations of Subgroup on Surface Physics: Agenda for Adhoc Apollo Group Meeting - 19 May 1962 U.S. Geological Survey library. Hooe Building, Washington, D.C. 1917. Eugene Clyde La Rue, Claude H. Birdseye, and Herman Stabler standing by the Grand. Washington, D.C. 1924. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees. Adams Building, Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees and presses, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. 1917. Alice Dowse Weeks, Geologist, estimating the mineral grain composition of a rock thin section. Rapid Rock Analysis Laboratory, USGS Geologic Division. Washington, D.C. 1958. DC-3 used in aeromagnetic surveys. National Airport. Washington, D.C. 1960. USGS employees, Adams Building, Washington, D.C. 1917. USGS employees, Adams Building. Washington, D.C. circa 1917. Groundwater Site Identification Indexes for Washington D.C., Baltimore City, and the Counties of Maryland A Surficial Hydrogeologic Framework for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain