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One of the greatest challenges facing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in the 21st century will be our ability to maintain sustainable fish and wildlife populations and meet the expectations and desire of our citizens. We approach habitat conservation and management on a landscape/watershed scale based on the needs of all fish and wildlife and citizens who either enjoy and/or depend on wildlife, and the land and water resources of the State. This requires a great deal of teamwork and a broader view of our responsibilities. Addressing habitat needs and issues that seek to maintain open spaces, non-fragmented, quality habitats and the ability of fish and wildlife to utilize these areas provides an opportunity...
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In 2002, Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory (RMBO), in cooperation with Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and the Wyoming Partners In Flight group, implemented a long-term, habitat-based bird monitoring program designed to provide rigorous population trend data on most diurnal, regularly occurring breeding bird species in Wyoming (Leukering et al. 2001). Modeled after Monitoring Colorado’s Birds (Leukering et al. 2000), this program is entitled Monitoring Wyoming’s Birds (MWB). Monitoring Wyoming’s Birds is consistent with goals emphasized in the Partners In Flight National Landbird Monitoring Strategy (Bart et al. 2001) and, in addition to monitoring bird...
Categories: Publication; Tags: WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) is a formerly abundant frog that has experienced significant declines across its range and is considered endangered in some parts of the range but still abundant in other parts of the range. Various factors have been invoked to explain population declines in the northern leopard frog, including habitat destruction, diseases, chemical contamination, acidification, increased ultraviolet light due to loss of the ozone layer, introduced predators, overcollecting, climatic changes, and general environmental degradation. However, no one cause has emerged as the primary factor behind population declines in any area. Probably, multiple causes contribute to population...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
The midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis concolor) has long been considered a subspecies of the western rattlesnake (C. viridis). This document will follow this convention, although there is some discussion of taxonomic revision at the species level that would categorize the midget faded rattlesnake as C. oreganos concolor (Crother et al. 2003). Midget faded rattlesnakes are a pale brownish gray, cream, or straw color. Blotches on the body are faded, subrectangular or sub-elliptical. As with most rattlesnakes, the most distinguishing feature is the rattle. Midget faded rattlesnakes are pit vipers, with the typical heat-sensing pits on each side of the head, between the eyes and mouth, used for detecting prey....
Flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), and roundtail chub (Gila robusta), hereafter target species, are native to the Colorado River basin and have undergone declines in both abundance and distribution throughout their ranges. Due to these declines, state and federal agencies have entered into a range-wide conservation agreement and strategy to ensure the persistence of these species in their native ranges (Utah Division of Wildlife Resources 2006) Weitzel (2002) reports that these three species were historically abundant in the Green River watershed of southwestern Wyoming. However, populations have declined in Wyoming (Weitzel 2002) and throughout the...
Categories: Publication; Tags: WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The dwarf shrew (Sorex nanus) is one of the smallest mammals in the world, and inhabits a variety of habitats in western North America. Very little is known about this shrew, and relatively few specimens have been collected. Like most members of Soricidae, the dwarf shrew has a long and pointed nose, small eyes and ears, and a small body. It is difficult to distinguish from other shrews and generally has to be identified by dental characteristics. The dwarf shrew occurs primarily in mountainous areas, apparently preferring rock outcrops and talus slopes in alpine, subalpine, and montane settings. However, it has been occasionally found in lower and more arid environments such as shortgrass prairie, shrub-steppe,...
The Rawlins Field Office area lies within south-central and southeast Wyoming (Figure 1). The main goals of our analysis of a Reasonable Foreseeable Development scenario were to technically analyze the oil and gas resource occurring within the Field Office area and to project future development potential and activity levels for the period 2001 through 2020. It is a base line scenario and thus it assumes that future activity levels will not be constrained by management-imposed conditions (Rocky Mountain Federal Leadership Forum, 2002). We have recognized current legislatively imposed restrictions that could affect future activity levels and constrained this base line scenario where those types of restrictions have...
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Myotis evotis (long-eared myotis), a former Category 2 Candidate, is currently recognized by several federal and state agencies as a sensitive species, in part because very little information exists to provide evaluations on population status and viability locally or rangewide. Primary threats to M. evotis are roost disturbance (especially that leading to loss or destruction of roosting structures), habitat alteration, and toxic chemicals. Roost disturbance (especially of maternity roosts and hibernacula) can take the form of direct human contact or alternation of the roost environment. Habitat alteration refers to modification of any component of the required habitat mosaic, (e.g., presence and quality...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella breweri) has significantly declined throughout its breeding range in the last 25 years (Ashley and Stoval 2004). Despite being thought of by many as the most common bird in spring and summer in shrubsteppe habitat, the Brewer’s Sparrow has been given special conservation status in several western states, including Wyoming (Knick and Rotenberry 2000). Habitat fragmentation and other processes threaten Brewer’s Sparrow populations in several ways. In this report, shrubsteppe is defined as habitat with a “…codominance of sagebrush [Artemesia spp.] and native bunch grass and moderate shrub cover” (B. Walker, personal communication). This report reviews key published literature,...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Habitat Quality Index (HQI) Procedures Manual is a step-by-step guide to the HQI method, which is used to evaluate trout habitat in Rocky Mountain streams. Purpose of the manual is to provide guidance and standards for conducting HQI evaluations. Subjects discussed included preliminary planning, station selection and layout, equipment, data sources, habitat measurements and HQI calculations. The manual promotes familiarity with the HQI by explaining how and what to measure, as well as proper techniuqes and any useful shortcuts. Text instruction are augmented by photos and line drawings. Several examples and case studies illustrate HQI evaluation procedures.
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The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) first developed a stream classification system in 1961. The inaugural system was intended to identify and rank the most important coldwater recreational fisheries to the State. Over time the system was also used to assess the relative potential impacts of proposed development projects to streams. The system also was adapted as one component in a land use management program to assess the relative value of properties being considered for acquisition by WGFD. The stream ranking protocol was periodically modified over the years. In its present form, streams are ranked using a combination of scores for productivity, accessibility and esthetics. In recent years, fisheries...
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The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is the smallest of any North American rabbit species. It was first described as Lepus idahoensis in 1891 by Meriam (Meriam 1891). It is endemic to sagebrush habitats in the Great Basin and adjacent intermountain areas and typically occupies tall and dense sagebrush patches. Pygmy rabbits are dietary specialists on big sagebrush. They are considered a keystone species in big sagebrush communities because they don’t thrive in habitats dominated by other shrub species, they exhibit a unique fossorial behavior, other species of vertebrates and invertebrates use their extensive burrow system, and they provide a reliable food supply for terrestrial and avian predators...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus) is and endemic shorebird species which breeds in grassland and shrubsteppe habitats of the western Great Plains and Colorado Plateau. Occurrences of this species in Wyoming are constrained to breeding and migration seasons. First described in 1837 by J. K. Townsend, from the tablelands of the Rocky Mountains in the region of the Sweetwater River, Wyoming (AOU 1983), this species is locally common and has been detected in every county of Wyoming. The Mountain Plover was proposed for listing as threatened under the Endangered Species Act by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1999. The proposal for listing was withdrawn in 2003, as perceived threats to the species...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
This Kemmerer planning area Reasonable Foreseeable Development (RFD) Scenario is part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Resource Management Plan (RMP) revision process. The purpose of the document is to provide land management planners with estimates of potential oil and gas occurrences and projections of oil and gas exploration and production activity within the planning area for the period 2001 through 2020. The information will be incorporated into the RMP and its associated Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Located in the southwestern corner of Wyoming, the Kemmerer planning area includes most of Uinta and Lincoln counties, the western portion of Sweetwater County, and a small area of Sublette County....
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Currently, little is known about the native fish assemblages present in the Green River drainage of southwestern Wyoming. Of particular interest are the bluehead sucker (BHS), flannelmouth sucker (FMS), and the roundtail chub (RTC). Bluehead sucker, FMS, and RTC have declined in Wyoming and throughout their native ranges. The Natural Heritage Program assigns BHS the global ranking of G4 suggesting its existence to be abundant and globally secure, although it may be quite rare in parts of its range and is thus the element of long-term concern (Fertig and Beauvais 1999). The Natural Heritage Program assigns FMS the global ranking of G3/G4 suggesting its existence to be uncertain. It is uncommon but seems...
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The western subspecies of Corynorhinus, C. townsendii pallescens and C. t. townsendii are not currently federally listed or candidate species throughout their range. Two eastern subspecies, C. townsendii ingens and C. townsendii virginianus, are currently listed as Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Both Regions 2 and 4 of the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management in Wyoming and Colorado list the full species as sensitive within their jurisdictions. The Bureau of Land Management in South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas apparently does not provide any special protection for the bats. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database lists it as being of particular conservation concern as indicated...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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Plegadis chihi, the White-faced Ibis, is a member of the Ciconiiformes order. They are large, long-legged birds, and they fly with a strong and steady wingbeat (Trost 1989). They are members of the Threskiornithidae family and as such are wading birds. They are gregarious, heronlike birds with long legs and long specialized bills to facilitate feeding in shallow waters (Field Guide to the Birds of North America 1999). They often fly in flocks of 10-50 birds, either in a “V” formation or in long lines, and their only vocalization is a double grunt that sounds like “greh-greh” (Trost 1989). The White-faced Ibis is an attractive wading bird that is locally common in the western United States, where it...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2002 to 14 April 2003 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in Appendix I or in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department Regional Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was distributed; this Plan...
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Four populations of Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) are currently recognized, including three disjunct, southern populations and a main population extending from northwest Wyoming through western Canada. The main (or northern) population includes Wyoming. It has no federal status as endangered or threatened and is generally considered to be secure, although some local declines have been documented. Most occupied habitat for the Columbia spotted frog occurs on lands managed by the National Forest Service (Regions 2 and 4) and the National Park Service (Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks ). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) may have potential habitat in the Green River Basin and higher...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, UCRB, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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One of the greatest challenges facing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in the 21st century will be our ability to maintain sustainable fish and wildlife populations and meet the expectations and desire of our citizens. This challenge can be met by addressing habitat needs and issues that seek to maintain open spaces, non-fragmented quality habitats and the ability of fish and wildlife to utilize these areas. Many areas of the state are imperiled or at-risk. Potential impacts to fish and wildlife are expanding, with some of the most noticeable being energy development, increasing demands for water, other land uses, and urban sprawl. The long-term drought, fire suppression and conflicts in public expectations...


map background search result map search result map Species Assessment for Western Long-Eared Myotis (Myotis Evotis) in Wyoming Species Assessment for White-Faced Ibis (Plegadis Chihi) in Wyoming Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2006 Habitat Quality Index Procedures Manual Species Assessment For The Northern Leopard Frog (Rana Pipiens) In Wyoming Modification of The Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s System For Classifying Stream Fisheries Addendum to Monitoring Wyoming's Birds, 2002-2004 Final Report Species Assessment for Dwarf Shrew (Sorex Nanus) in Wyoming Green River Watershed Native Non-Game Fish Species Research: Phase II Species Assessment For Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus [=Plecotus] Townsendii) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella Breweri) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Pygmy Rabbit (Brachylagus Idahoensis) In Wyoming Species assessment for Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Mountain Plover (Charadrius Montanus) In Wyoming Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2007 Green River Watershed Native Non-Game Fish Species Research: Phase II Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2006 Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2007 Species Assessment for Western Long-Eared Myotis (Myotis Evotis) in Wyoming Species Assessment for White-Faced Ibis (Plegadis Chihi) in Wyoming Habitat Quality Index Procedures Manual Species Assessment For The Northern Leopard Frog (Rana Pipiens) In Wyoming Modification of The Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s System For Classifying Stream Fisheries Addendum to Monitoring Wyoming's Birds, 2002-2004 Final Report Species Assessment for Dwarf Shrew (Sorex Nanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus [=Plecotus] Townsendii) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella Breweri) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Pygmy Rabbit (Brachylagus Idahoensis) In Wyoming Species assessment for Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Mountain Plover (Charadrius Montanus) In Wyoming