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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
thumbnail
The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
thumbnail
The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates at 40-meter intervals along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013 two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from NOAA's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 update includes two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines for the Massachusetts...
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One goal of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program's NGHP-02 expedition was to examine the geomechanical response of marine sediment to the extraction of methane from gas hydrate found offshore eastern India in the Bay of Bengal. Methane gas hydrate is a naturally occurring crystalline solid that sequesters methane in individual molecular cages in a lattice of water molecules. Methane gas hydrate is a potential energy resource, but whether extracting methane from gas hydrate in the marine subsurface is technically and economically viable remains an open research topic as of 2018. This data release provides insight about a poorly quantified aspect of this process: the reaction of fine-grained sediment particles...
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Geophysical and geological survey data were collected off Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, in May and July 2016. Approximately 130 linear kilometers of subbottom (seismic-reflection) and 234-kilohertz interferometric sonar (bathymetric and backscatter) data were collected along with sediment samples, sea floor photographs, and (or) video at 26 sites within the geophysical survey area. Sediment grab samples were collected at 19 of the 26 sampling sites and video and (or) photographic imagery of the sea floor were taken at all 26 sites. These survey data are used to characterize the sea floor by identifying sediment-texture, seabed morphology, and underlying geologic structure and stratigraphy. Data collected...
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In September 2018, the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted high-resolution geophysical mapping and sediment sampling to determine the distribution of historical mine tailings on the floor of Lake Superior. Large amounts of waste material from copper mining, locally known as “stamp sands,” were dumped into the lake in the early 20th century, with wide-reaching consequences that have continued into the present. Mapping was focused offshore of the town of Gay on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan, where ongoing erosion and re-deposition of the stamp sands has buried miles of native, white-sand beaches. Stamp sands are also encroaching onto Buffalo Reef, a large...
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In September 2018, the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted high-resolution geophysical mapping and sediment sampling to determine the distribution of historical mine tailings on the floor of Lake Superior. Large amounts of waste material from copper mining, locally known as “stamp sands,” were dumped into the lake in the early 20th century, with wide-reaching consequences that have continued into the present. Mapping was focused offshore of the town of Gay on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan, where ongoing erosion and re-deposition of the stamp sands has buried miles of native, white-sand beaches. Stamp sands are also encroaching onto Buffalo Reef, a large...
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In September 2018, the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), in collaboration with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), conducted high-resolution geophysical mapping and sediment sampling to determine the distribution of historical mine tailings on the floor of Lake Superior. Large amounts of waste material from copper mining, locally known as “stamp sands”, were dumped into the lake in the early 20th century, with wide-reaching consequences that have continued into the present day. Mapping was focused offshore of the town of Gay on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan, where ongoing erosion and re-deposition of the stamp sands has buried miles of native, white-sand beaches and is steadily...
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Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained from a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
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Low-altitude (80-100 meters above ground level) digital images of Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, were obtained from a camera mounted on a small unmanned aerial system (UAS; also known as a drone). Imagery was collected at close to low tide on seven days to observe changes in beach and dune morphology. The images were geolocated by using the single-frequency geographic positioning system aboard the UAS. Ground control points (GCPs) were established by using temporary targets on the ground, which were located by using a real-time kinematic global navigation satellite system (RTK-GNSS) base station and rovers. The GCPs can be used as constraints during photogrammetric processing. Transect points were collected...
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In spring and summer 2017, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Gas Hydrates Project conducted two cruises aboard the research vessel Hugh R. Sharp to explore the geology, chemistry, ecology, physics, and oceanography of sea-floor methane seeps and water column gas plumes on the northern U.S. Atlantic margin between the Baltimore and Keller Canyons. Split-beam and multibeam echo sounders and a chirp subbottom profiler were deployed during the cruises to map water column backscatter, sea-floor bathymetry and backscatter, and subsurface stratigraphy associated with known and undiscovered sea-floor methane seeps. The first cruise, known as the Interagency Mission for Methane Research on Seafloor Seeps and designated as field...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Accomac Canyon, Atlantic Margin, Atlantic Ocean, CMHRP, Chincoteague Ridge, All tags...
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High resolution bathymetric, sea-floor backscatter, and seismic-reflection data were collected offshore of southeastern Louisiana aboard the research vessel Point Sur on May 19-26, 2017, in an effort to characterize mudflow hazards on the Mississippi River Delta front. As the initial field program of a research cooperative between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and other Federal and academic partners, the primary objective of this cruise was to assess the suitability of sea-floor mapping and shallow subsurface imaging tools in the challenging environmental conditions found across delta fronts (for example, variably distributed water column stratification and widespread biogenic...


map background search result map search result map Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Alabama Shorelines of the Mississippi coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Shorelines of the Florida west (FLwest) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Offshore baseline for the Texas east (TXeast) coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates Offshore baseline for the Texas west (TXwest) coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for northeastern Florida (FLne) Geotagged Low-Altitude Aerial Imagery From Unmanned Aerial Systems Flights Over Town Neck Beach, in Sandwich, Massachusetts, on 2017-01-25 Geotagged Low-Altitude Aerial Imagery From Unmanned Aerial Systems Flights Over Town Neck Beach, in Sandwich, Massachusetts, on 2017-04-28 Multibeam Echosounder, Reson T-20P deep site backscatter (4-m), USGS field activity 2017-003-FA, Mississippi River Delta front offshore of southeastern Louisiana (8-bit GeoTIFF, UTM Zone 16N, NAD 83) Sedimentation Rate Dependence on Pore Fluid Chemistry for Sediment Collected From Area B, Krishna-Godavari Basin, During India's National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition NGHP-02 2013 profile-derived mean high water shorelines of the South Coast of MA used in shoreline change analysis. Intersects for coastal region around Boston, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term and short-term shoreline change rates for the coast south of Boston, Massachusetts, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Baseline for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates (with the proxy-datum bias) using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term and short-term shoreline change rates for Nantucket, Massachusetts calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Grain-size analysis of sediment samples collected in July 2016 by the U.S. Geological Survey off Town Neck Beach, Sandwich in Massachusetts, during field activity 2016-037-FA (CSV file and simplified shapefile) Multibeam bathymetric data collected in the vicinity of Buffalo Reef, Michigan, within Lake Superior during USGS Field Activity 2018-043-FA using a dual-head Reson T20-P multibeam echosounder (32-bit GeoTIFF, UTM Zone 16N, NAD 83, NAVD 88 Vertical Datum, 2-m resolution) Seismic Reflection, Boomer profile images collected in the vicinity of Buffalo Reef, Michigan, within Lake Superior,during USGS field activity 2018-043-FA, (PNG Images) Multibeam bathymetric trackline data collected in the vicinity of Buffalo Reef, Michigan, within Lake Superior during USGS Field Activity 2018-043-FA using a dual-head Reson T20-P multibeam echosounder (Esri polyline shapefile, Geographic, WGS 84) Chirp seismic reflection - shotpoints, tracklines, profile images, and SEG-Y traces for EdgeTech SB-512i chirp data collected during USGS field activity 2017-002-FA Sedimentation Rate Dependence on Pore Fluid Chemistry for Sediment Collected From Area B, Krishna-Godavari Basin, During India's National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition NGHP-02 Geotagged Low-Altitude Aerial Imagery From Unmanned Aerial Systems Flights Over Town Neck Beach, in Sandwich, Massachusetts, on 2017-01-25 Geotagged Low-Altitude Aerial Imagery From Unmanned Aerial Systems Flights Over Town Neck Beach, in Sandwich, Massachusetts, on 2017-04-28 Grain-size analysis of sediment samples collected in July 2016 by the U.S. Geological Survey off Town Neck Beach, Sandwich in Massachusetts, during field activity 2016-037-FA (CSV file and simplified shapefile) Seismic Reflection, Boomer profile images collected in the vicinity of Buffalo Reef, Michigan, within Lake Superior,during USGS field activity 2018-043-FA, (PNG Images) Multibeam Echosounder, Reson T-20P deep site backscatter (4-m), USGS field activity 2017-003-FA, Mississippi River Delta front offshore of southeastern Louisiana (8-bit GeoTIFF, UTM Zone 16N, NAD 83) Multibeam bathymetric trackline data collected in the vicinity of Buffalo Reef, Michigan, within Lake Superior during USGS Field Activity 2018-043-FA using a dual-head Reson T20-P multibeam echosounder (Esri polyline shapefile, Geographic, WGS 84) Multibeam bathymetric data collected in the vicinity of Buffalo Reef, Michigan, within Lake Superior during USGS Field Activity 2018-043-FA using a dual-head Reson T20-P multibeam echosounder (32-bit GeoTIFF, UTM Zone 16N, NAD 83, NAVD 88 Vertical Datum, 2-m resolution) 2013 profile-derived mean high water shorelines of the South Coast of MA used in shoreline change analysis. Baseline for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates (with the proxy-datum bias) using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for coastal region around Boston, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term and short-term shoreline change rates for Nantucket, Massachusetts calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term and short-term shoreline change rates for the coast south of Boston, Massachusetts, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Chirp seismic reflection - shotpoints, tracklines, profile images, and SEG-Y traces for EdgeTech SB-512i chirp data collected during USGS field activity 2017-002-FA Shorelines of the Florida west (FLwest) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for northeastern Florida (FLne) Offshore baseline for the Texas east (TXeast) coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates