Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: UrbanLandUse (X)

11 results (102ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
There are three designated megaregions in the Pacific Coast States: Southern California, with a population of 22.4 million; Northern California, with a population of 14.6 million; and Cascadia (from Vancouver, British Columbia to Eugene, Oregon), with a population of 8.4 million. These areas have enormous effects on both the inland and coastal aquatic habitats. Continual development increases areas of impervious surfaces (completely altering natural water flows and hydrology) and the amount of sewage discharge, sediments, and other pollutants associated with urbanization. Ever increasing urban water needs can be far reaching and affect systems and fish habitat far away from the urban areas. Los Angeles, which is...
thumbnail
Major cities, such as Detroit, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and numerous smaller lakefront cities support a population of over 21 million people in the Upper Midwest area. Converting land to urban areas has reduced fish habitat through the filling of wetlands, altered rivers and streams to convey artificially-caused high-flow events through these areas, decreased the streams ability to meander, and has converted natural lake shorelines to bulkheads and seawalls. Many parcels of private land in the forested portions of this region: are being sold for development of subdivided vacation communities; have impoundments developed on free flowing streams to create “new” lakefront properties; and are seeing a rapid...
thumbnail
Forty-three percent of the surface area of Alaska is wetlands. On a state-wide basis, less than 2 percent of all wetlands have been developed. However, in many developing areas and communities, wetlands may be the only land type available for development. In urbanized and developed areas of Alaska, such as the Anchorage Bowl, it is estimated that over half of the wetlands have been lost to transportation corridor construction, utility installation, buildings, and other development projects. Wetland loss fragments habitat and disrupts migration of fish that use wetlands as resting places on their lengthy migrations, and it is also critical rearing habitat for young salmon. Wetland loss is also linked to altered native...
thumbnail
Miami, Tampa, Orlando, and Jacksonville rank in the top 50 largest cities in the nation by area. Atlanta and New Orleans are the only other top 50 cities in the Eastern Gulf States region. These four Florida urban centers anchor what is known as the Florida Megaregion, one of eleven recognized in the United States. New Orleans and Baton Rouge are part of the Gulf Coast Megaregion. The growing urban sprawl throughout the Gulf States leads to increasing areas of impervious surface, which results in altered water flows and more urban runoff that transports high levels of nutrients and pollution to aquatic resources. For example in central Mississippi, pathogens, litter/trash, nutrients, and pesticides from increasing...
thumbnail
Urban areas significantly and negatively affect aquatic habitat quality in the Mountain States. This was particularly apparent in the rapidly growing Denver/Ft. Collins, Boise, Salt Lake City, Great Falls, and Billings areas. Highway corridors along Interstates 25 and 90 in Wyoming and 76 in Colorado were implicated to be causing high to very high risk factors. In 2015, the highly urbanized I-25 corridor between Cheyenne, WY and Pueblo, CO had a population of 4.49 million people. In these cities and their surrounding suburbs, large areas of impervious surfaces (i.e. buildings, parking lots, and roads) replace natural streamside habitat, increase pollution and sedimentation, alter hydrology, and increase the demand...
thumbnail
The southeastern states contain the rapidly growing urban centers of Atlanta, Greenville, Columbia, Charlotte, and Winston-Salem/Raleigh with suburban corridors between them. In these cities and the surrounding suburbs, large areas of impervious surfaces replace natural streamside habitat, increase pollution and sedimentation, and alter water flow (hydrology). In this 2015 assessment, land cover type was estimated to be a major risk factor for about one-third of the estuaries of the Southeastern states. The United States Department of Agriculture reports that from 1982 to 2012 over 2.6 million acres of rural land in Georgia was developed. Development in North Carolina was almost as high, while South Carolina lost...
Many of the Gulf Coast estuaries of Florida were scored to be at low or very low risk. However, Sarasota Bay scored at high risk, largely due to basin development. Although this variable is comprised of both urban and agricultural land use, urban development is the dominant landscape in this watershed. Other estuaries affected by urban land use are Galveston, Bay near Houston, and Lake Pontchartrain adjacent to New Orleans. In 2008, there were over 20 million people living in the coastal counties of the Gulf of Mexico, where the population increased by 103% since 1970. The Houston area, by highly stressed Galveston Bay, had the second most building permits, 56,863, in the nation in 2015. Runoff from these large...
thumbnail
In the 1990s, urban land in Ohio, Illinois, and Indiana increased by about 10 percent. Currently, Ohio and Illinois are among the 10 most populous states in the nation, while Indiana is 16th. Over 31 million people live in these three states. Large cities such as Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and Cleveland, as well as the suburban sprawl throughout the region, have created large areas of impervious surfaces and urban pollution near the rivers and lakes. These factors are known to degrade fish habitat by changing water flow (hydrology) and by adding excessive amounts of nutrients, pollutants and sediment into the waters in this region.
thumbnail
The northeast is one of the most urbanized areas in the country, with a high percentage of impervious surfaces in some of its watersheds. These impervious surfaces alter the water flow (hydrology) of streams and increase sedimentation, nutrient loading, and pollution in rivers, lakes, and bays. Urbanization also results in the direct loss of fish habitat as wetlands are filled, streams diverted, and channels dredged. The effects of urbanization are apparent in the greater New York City area, Boston, Westchester-Springfield, Providence, and Buffalo-Rochester. However, increasing suburban sprawl also has a significant negative affect on aquatic habitats. From 1982 to 2012, developed land increased by almost three...
thumbnail
Major population centers exist on most of the islands, particularly on O’ahu which has a densely populated urban core. Urban sprawl increased by 76,000 acres from 1982 to 2012, which equals about two percent of Hawaii’s land mass. Urbanization results in physical loss of aquatic habitat as well as polluted runoff and altered hydrology. The Hawaiian Department of Health in 2015 listed sediment, nutrients, and bacteria as the most common threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health and that the vast majority of impaired sites are marine areas. Development contributes excessive sedimentation through improperly constructed roads and drainage systems, poor construction practices, and to nutrient loading through landscape...
thumbnail
The Southern Plains States contain one of the fastest-growing urban centers areas in the country— the Texas Triangle of Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, and San Antonio, where more than 17 million people are spread over 58,000 square miles. Texas is also part of the Gulf Coast megaregion. In these cities and the surrounding suburbs, large areas of impervious surfaces have replaced natural streamside habitat, increased pollution and sedimentation, and completely altered water flows (hydrology). Declining fish populations are the result, near the cities as well as in downstream river reaches. Water coming from both of these megaregions also seriously affects fish habitat in receiving coastal bays and estuaries. Another...


    map background search result map search result map Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Fffecting Fish Habitat in Southeast Atlantic States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Pacific Coast States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Mountain States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Eastern Gulf of Mexico States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Alaska Description of Urbanization as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Southern Plains States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Northeastern States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Hawaii Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Fffecting Fish Habitat in Southeast Atlantic States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Northeastern States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Eastern Gulf of Mexico States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Pacific Coast States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Mountain States Description of Urbanization as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Southern Plains States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Hawaii Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Alaska