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The Ironcolor Shiner (Notropis chalybaeus) is found in deep pool areas of creeks and small rivers and is often associated with aquatic vegetation. This species needs clear sandy areas for spawning. Populations of Ironcolor Shiner are in decline due to increased turbidity, siltation, and pollution.
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Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota border four of the five Great Lakes (lakes Michigan, Superior, Huron, and Erie) and have over 150,000 miles of rivers and streams and 50,000 inland lakes within their boundaries. The upper Mississippi River flows through the Upper Midwest states, from its headwaters in Minnesota along the boundary between Minnesota and Wisconsin. Much of the region has deep glacial deposits which has a tremendous influence over the habitat types and water flow (hydrology), providing for some of the most stable river flows in the United States. An exception to the glaciated region is a unique region of deeply carved unglaciated river valleys known as “The Driftless Area” which located in southwestern...
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Major cities, such as Detroit, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and numerous smaller lakefront cities support a population of over 21 million people in the Upper Midwest area. Converting land to urban areas has reduced fish habitat through the filling of wetlands, altered rivers and streams to convey artificially-caused high-flow events through these areas, decreased the streams ability to meander, and has converted natural lake shorelines to bulkheads and seawalls. Many parcels of private land in the forested portions of this region: are being sold for development of subdivided vacation communities; have impoundments developed on free flowing streams to create “new” lakefront properties; and are seeing a rapid...
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A major hub for manufacturing and transportation, the Great Lakes and their tributaries were once an easy dump site for their waste products that included organic toxins, mercury, PCBs, and dioxins. As a result of the Federal Clean Water Act (1972) most of the direct pollution discharges from known point sources have stopped, but the legacy pollutants remain because many are trapped in lake and stream sediments. Other dissolved pollutants have long residence times because less than one percent of the water in the Great Lakes exits the lake system annually. Discharge from sewage treatment systems remains a problem, particularly where stormwater and sewage systems are combined in large urban areas. The inland fish...
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Partnerships - Driftless Area Restoration Effort, Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership, Great Plains Fish Habitat Partnership, Midwest Glacial Lakes Partnership, Fishes and Farmers Partnership, and Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership Partners removed: one barrier in Minnesota that increased fish passage to over 3 miles of streams; 12 barriers in Wisconsin that increased fish passage by 12 miles and reconnected 15 acres of wetlands to streams; and 13 barriers in Michigan that reconnected over 147 miles of streams. In Wisconsin, enhanced 13.0 stream miles for Brook Trout including tributary spawning habitat, 20.5 miles of mixed Brook/Brown Trout water, and 13.2 miles of stream for Brown Trout. Improved...
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A. Pervasive disturbances: The most common disturbances based on total stream length in a given region. Top five overall most pervasive disturbances to all stream reaches, regardless of stream size and across all spatial scales ranked highest first): Crop land use Population density Pasture and hay land use Road crossing density Low intensity land use Top three most pervasive disturbances to creeks (watersheds <100 km 2 in area) across all spatial scales: Crop land use Population density Low intensity urban land use Top three most pervasive disturbances to rivers (watersheds >100 km 2 in area) across all spatial scales : Pasture and hay land use Population density Crop land use Top five most pervasive...
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Map of the risk of current fish habitat degradation of inland streams of the Upper Midwest States.
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Partnership – Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership The nearly 300 square mile Boardman River watershed is located in Grand Traverse and Kalkaska Counties in northwest Michigan. With the exception of the extreme lower river and three impoundments, the Boardman River is an oligotrophic river system with excellent water quality characterized by cold temperatures, high dissolved oxygen concentrations, and nutrients provided by distant inputs. Of the approximately 179 miles of river and tributary streams in the Boardman system, 36 miles are designated as a “Blue Ribbon” trout stream, providing premier fish habitat. Anglers from near and far come to enjoy the predominantly resident Brook and Brown Trout fishery,...
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The Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongatus) prefers small to medium, cool, clear, rubble- and gravel-bottomed streams. This type of habitat in streams is disappearing in parts of the region because of excessive sedimentation, altered water flows, and nutrient inputs from farming, mining, and urban development.
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Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) is the largest species (maximum weight between 300-400 lbs.), longest lived (50-year-olds are common but can reach over 100 years in age), and among the slowest maturing species (first reproduction is between 15-25 years old) found in the Great Lakes region. Historically, this species had populations that numbered in the millions basin-wide but had been reduced to remnant populations by 1920 from overharvest; habitat destruction from river channel alteration, landscape scale logging, and pollution from industrialization; and barrier construction. The Lake Sturgeon requires clean rock substrates for spawning and often undertakes long migrations to complete its life history. Although...
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Corn, soybeans, other row crops, and dairy farms dominate the landscape across southern Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan. Most of the agricultural activity in this region came at the expense of the large wetland complexes and woodlots that were found across the landscape in this region.Tile drains have been used extensively throughout the region and have turned streams and wetlands into drainage ditches, devoid of fish habitat. These drainage systems have completely altered stream flow patterns (hydrology), increasing watershed-wide peak discharge events that have destabilized downstream river reaches and decreased baseflows, in these areas. These changes in water flow patterns have created higher bank erosion...
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The Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) requires cold, clean rivers and streams. This species will move long distances to find cold water refugia and spawning habitat with upwelling groundwater, however, the species suffers from habitat degradation and watershed fragmentation. Land use changes have resulted in excessive erosion and increased water temperatures and the large number of dams and culverts in the region heavily fragment available habitat.
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Minnesota is known as “The Land of 10,000 Lakes” and officially there are 11,842 lakes more than 10 acres (40,000 m²) in size. The prevalence of lakes has generated many repeat names. For example, there are more than 200 Mud Lakes, 150 Long Lakes, and 120 Rice Lakes. Minnesota's waters flow outward in three directions: 1) north to Hudson Bay in Canada; 2) east to the Atlantic Ocean; and 3) south to the Gulf of Mexico. Wisconsin and Michigan both have waters that flow east to the Atlantic Ocean and south to the Gulf of Mexico. Wetlands acreage present in 1850: 18.6 million acres (7.5 million hectares). Wetlands acreage present in 2008: 10.6 million acres (4.3 million hectares). Massive ice sheets at least 1 kilometer...
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Dams and other barriers are having a significant effect on fish habitat in the Upper Midwest. More than 3,700 dams have been constructed on Wisconsin’s warm water streams. Similarly, there are 2,500 listed dams in Michigan and likely a similar number that are not in the dam safety database for that state. In the Lake Michigan watershed alone, dams, culverts, and road crossings that impede fish migration have reduced nearly 19,000 miles of accessible stream habitat to only 3,300 miles. With many Great Lakes fish species using tributaries as spawning and nursery habitats, these barriers are a significant factor impairing the full recovery of fish populations in the Great Lakes. Similar fragmentation occurs on other...
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Partnership - Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership The Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework ( GLAHF) is an international, basin-wide, comprehensive database and spatial framework for the Great Lakes Basin. It is supported by the Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership and links available fisheries and habitat inventory, assessment, and monitoring data with restoration and management plans and policies across multiple spatial and temporal scales. GLAHF consists of three components: 1) a spatial framework of geo-referenced grid cells that allow aggregation into larger units; 2) a suite of geologic, hydrologic, connectivity, and physiographic variables (>300) important to aquatic communities attributed...


    map background search result map search result map Upper Midwest States - Risk of Current Fish Habitat Degradation Map Habitat Trouble for Redside Dace in Upper Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnership Activities for the Upper Midwest States Most Pervasive and Severe Disturbances for the Upper Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Ironcolor Shiner in Upper Midwest States Description of Pollution as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Summary of Scientific Findings for Upper Midwest States Description of Dams and Other Barriers as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference with Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework (GLAHF) Description of Agriculture as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Boardman River, Michigan Habitat Trouble for Lake Sturgeon in Upper Midwest States Facts About Upper Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Brook Trout in Upper Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Upper Midwest States - Risk of Current Fish Habitat Degradation Map Habitat Trouble for Redside Dace in Upper Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnership Activities for the Upper Midwest States Most Pervasive and Severe Disturbances for the Upper Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Ironcolor Shiner in Upper Midwest States Description of Pollution as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Summary of Scientific Findings for Upper Midwest States Description of Dams and Other Barriers as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference with Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework (GLAHF) Description of Agriculture as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Boardman River, Michigan Habitat Trouble for Lake Sturgeon in Upper Midwest States Facts About Upper Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Brook Trout in Upper Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Upper Midwest States