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Caption: Aerial view from the southwest of erupting Mount St. Helens volano, Washington, May 18, 1980. Photo taken by Austin Post, U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington, shows billowing plume surrounding intense vertical venting from summit crater. In background, secondary steam eruption from Spirit Lake can be seen rising above lower cloud layers. The initial plume of the May 18 eruption reached more than 60,000 feet into the atmosphere. USGS scientists estimate that the minimum volume of ash and rock ejected during the May 18 eruption amounted to about 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion curbin yeards) of material. The estimate is based on an assumption that the new crater formed by the blast at Mount St. Helens...
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Caption: Ash from Mount St. Helens - a pinpoint view. A sequence of scanning electron micrographs of fine particles of volcano ash from the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano dispersed on the point of an ordinary straight pin. Micrographs prepared in U.S. Geological Survey laboratories at the USGS National Center, Reston, Virginia. In left photo, magnification is about 30 times; in center, about 210 times; and in right, about 1500 times. Particles are characteristically irregular and angular in shape and range in size down to less that 1/10th of a micrometer (there are about 25 micrometers in 1/100th of an inch). Sample was collected in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, about 200 miles northeast of Mount St....
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Caption: Mount St. Helens before the big blast. April 10, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens from the east, showing one of several small steam and ash eruptions that occurred during th day. This eruption occurred about two weeks after the initial eruption on March 27, 1980 at this Cascade Mountain Range volcano and five weeks before the major eruption on May 18, 1980. USGS scientist have estimated that a minimum of one cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano during that Sunday morning eruption. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced slightly more than one cubic kilometer in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883 produced...
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Caption: The dark, raised and solidified lava dome in the still steaming crater of Mount St. Helens now contains the youngest rock in the United States as a result of the volcano's April 10, 1981, eruption, according to U.S. Geological Survey scientists. USGS scientists said the new dome contains new rock material that solidified as a result of the April 10 eruption as well as sections formed during three earlier dome-building eruptions in October and December 1980 and February 1981. As a result of the latest eruption, the dome has increased in size to about 375 feet in height, 1,200 feet in width, and about 2,000 feet in length. The Mount St. Helens crater blown out by the devastating May 18, 1980, explosive...
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Information from USGS Public Information Office, PIO No. 79-144 release statement, 1979: Teton Range. Jagged peaks of the Teton Range tower more than 7,000 feet above the flat floor of Jackson Hole in northwest Wyoming. Photo File No. PIO-79-144(5b).
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Caption: Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. March 28, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing ash and steam eruption that sent volcanic material almost two miles above the mountain's 9,677-foot peak. When the main eruption violently occurred seven weeks later on May 18, 1980, an estimated minimum of 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano, according to USGS scientists. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius spewed slightly more than 1 cubic kilometer in its eruption in 79 A.D. that buried Pompeii. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883 produced about 20 cubic kilometers. The force of the volcanic blast on that Sunday morning in May 1980, was estimated...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens temporarily quiet. March 31, 1980 view from the southwest of Washington state's Mount St. Helens with Mount Ranier shown in foreground. The 9,677-foot volcano awakened from 123 years of quiet on March 27, and literally blew its top in a specatcular eruption on May 18. That Sunday morning explosion opened up the north flank of the mountain down to about 4,400 feet and released the energy equivalent of 10-50 megatons of TNT or about the same as 500-2,500 atomic bombs similar to that droppwed on Hiroshima at the end of WWII. USGS scientists say the amount of ash and rock ejected during the eruption amounted to about 1 cubic kilometer (about 1.3 billion cubic yards). In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens forms single crater. April 6, 1980 aerial view from the north of Mount St. Helens showing the single crater that was formed from the two separeate, smaller craters created in the mountain's summit crater. The violent eruption that occured on May 18, 1980 opened and extended the crater on the north side of the mountain from the 9,677-foot level to the 4,400-foot level with a force that was estimated to be the equivalent of 10-50 megatons of TNT or about as powerful as 600-2,500 of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima at the end of WWII. The amount of ash and rock ejected by the volcano was estimated by USGS scientists to be about 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards). In comparison,...
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Information from USGS Public Information Office, PIO No. Hist - 56D release statement, no date: Transportation Troubles in D.C. Trolley and horses splashing through flooded street in downtown Washington, D.C. on June 1, 1889 in wake of torrential rains that brought heavy flooding to Potomac River basin. According to U.S. Geololgical Survey hydrologists, the June 1889 Potomac flood may have equalled or surpassed the March 1936 flood which, for magnitude of discharge (a flow of 313 billion gallons was measured on March 19, 1936) ranks as the biggest Potomac flood of record.
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Caption: Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. March 28, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing ash and steam eruption that sent volcanic material almost two miles above the mountain's 9,677-foot peak. When the main eruption violently occurred seven weeks later on May 18, 1980, an estimated minimum of 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano, according to USGS scientists. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius spewed slightly more than 1 cubic kilometer in its eruption in 79 A.D. that buried Pompeii. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883 produced over 20 cubic kilometers. The force of the volcanic blast on that Sunday morning in May 1980, was estimated...
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Information from USGS Public Information Office, PIO No. Hist-56e release statement, no date: Watery Washington. During June 1 and 2, 1889, some residents of downtown Washington, D.C. used rowboats for transportation in the wake of torrential rains that brought heavy flooding to the Potomac basin. U.S. Geological Survey hydrologists estimate that the June 1889 Potomac flood probably equalled, if not surpassed, the March 1936 flood whic, for magnitude of discharge, ranks as the biggest Potomac flood of record.
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Caption: Mount St. Helens building for the big blast. April 10, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens from the south, showing one of several small steam and ash eruptions that occurred during the day. This eruption occurred about two weeks after the initial eruption on March 27, 1980 at this Cascade Mountain Range volcano and five weeks before the major eruption on May 18, 1980. USGS scientists have estimated that a minimum of one cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano during that Sunday morning eruption. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced slightly more than one cubic kilometer in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens a year later. This recent photograph shows the crater area of Mount St. Helens about a year after the volcano came to life on March 27, 1980, following 123 years of quiet, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The lava dome, the darkened raised area in the center of the photo, developed during more recent eruptions of the volcano and now measures 500 feet high and 2,000 feet long. The steep walls of the steaming 1 1/4 by 2 mile crater are seen in the upper portion of the photo. The present crater occupies the general area of the north face of the mountain that was bulging for months prior to the devastating May 18 eruption. The late March initial eruption -- the first in the conterminous...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens spews steam and ash. April 12, 1980, aerial veiw of Mount St. Helens from the south, showing one of several steam and ash eruptions that occurred during the day. This eruption occurred about two weeks after the initial eruption of March 27, 1980 at this Cascade Mountain Range volcano and about five weeks before the major eruption on May 18, 1980. USGS scientists have estimated that a minimum of one cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano during that Sunday morning eruption. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced sightly more than one cubic kilomether in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens expands before the big blast. April 10, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens from the north, showing one of several small steam and gas eruptions taht occurred during the day. The area in the center of the photo that has a cracked and slightly "bulging" apperance is the north face of the mountain that exploded outward during the May 18, 1980 major eruption that USGS scientists estimate ejected a minimum of one cubic kilometer (1.3 illion curbi yards) of ash and rock. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced slightly more than one cubic kilometer in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Krakataua in 1883 produced about 20 cubic kilometers of ash. USGS scientists also...
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Caption: Mount St. Helen's after eruption activity (from yearbook cover) 1981. The cover photographs, taken from approximately the same spot about 7 miles north-northeast of Mount St. Helens, graphically show the enormous change that the eruption caused. Stamped on back of photograph: Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, Photo File No. PIO- 81-119(2d) Published as one of the cover photographs in the U.S. Geological Survey Yearbook, fiscal year 1980.
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Caption: Map shows volcanic eruptions in Southern Alaska. Augustine volcano, which is shown in the middle of this map of volcanic eruptions in southern Alaska during the past half century, began erupting early Thursday, March 27, 1986, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Augustine is the only one of the volcanoes shown on the map that is not on the mainland. It forms a small, uninhabited island of the same name in southern Cook Inlet about 180 miles southwest of Anchorage and 70 miles west of Homer on the Kenai Peninsula. Peulik was the last of the volcanoes to erupt, in 1977, before Thursday's activity by Augustine, which last erupted in 1976. Augustine, which rises to 4,025 feet above seal level, is part...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens in Action. Aerial view of the erupting Mount St. Helens volcano, Wahington, Taken about 6:00p.m., May 18, 1980, from the northwest. View shows, in part, the new vent-valley (second blow out area) whic was formed during the initial blast which occurred about 9 hours earlier. Mount Hood can be seen in background to the right of Mount St. Helens. Photo by Austin Post, U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington. The initial plume of the May 18 eruption reached more than 60,000 feet into the atmosphere. USGS scientists estimate that the minimum volume of ash and rock ejected during the May 18 eruption amounted to about 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion curbin yeards) of material. The estimate...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens before emits steam and ash. April 10, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens from the east, showing one of several small steam and ash eruptions that occurred during th day. This eruption occurred about two weeks after the initial eruption on March 27, 1980 at this Cascade Mountain Range volcano and five weeks before the major eruption on May 18, 1980. USGS scientist have estimated that a minimum of one cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano during that Sunday morning eruption. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced slightly more than one cubic kilometer in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883...


map background search result map search result map Map of volcanic eruptions in Southern Alaska. 1986. Residents of downtown Washington, D.C. using rowboats for transportation due to flooding. 1889. Trolley and horses splashing through flooded streets. Washington, D.C. 1889. Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. 1979. Mount St. Helen's after eruption activity. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Mount St. Helens dome produces youngest rock. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens volcano erupting. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens volcano erupting. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Ash from Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens rom the east before the eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing steam and ash eruptions. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing small steam and gas eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Snow covered lava dome. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Mount St. Helens forms single crater. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens building for the big blast. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens emits steam and ash. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens - a year later. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing ash and steam eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens with Mount Ranier in foreground. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Residents of downtown Washington, D.C. using rowboats for transportation due to flooding. 1889. Trolley and horses splashing through flooded streets. Washington, D.C. 1889. Teton Range, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. 1979. Mount St. Helen's after eruption activity. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Mount St. Helens dome produces youngest rock. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens volcano erupting. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens volcano erupting. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Ash from Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens rom the east before the eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing steam and ash eruptions. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing small steam and gas eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Snow covered lava dome. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Mount St. Helens forms single crater. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens building for the big blast. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens emits steam and ash. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens - a year later. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing ash and steam eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens with Mount Ranier in foreground. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Map of volcanic eruptions in Southern Alaska. 1986.