Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: USGS PIO Collection (X)

83 results (298ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens eruptions continue. This June 22, 1980 scene looking north at Washington state's Mount St. Helens shows the fourth significant eruption of the Cascade Mountain Range volcano since it began awakening in late March 1980 after 123 years of quiet. During the main eruption on May 18, 1980, the mountain ejected about 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock which fell over 11 western and central states. The force of the main eruption blast removed about 5,000 feet from the north face of the mountain and knocked down trees in a 185 suqare-mile area near the volcano. PIO No. 80-186a
thumbnail
Caption: Laser beams keep watch on Mount St. Helens. Using a laser beam aimed at the smoldering Mount St. Helens in southern Washington, U.S. Geological Survey scientists have detected ground movement in a northerly direction of about 1/2-inch per day inside the volcano during early September, 1980. The ground movement, according to the scientists, can be caused by the movement of magma or a relaxation of the monitored area to a temporarily more stable position. The laser distance measuring device is approximately 5 miles away from the volcano where a signal receiving unit, using material similar to that used on highway signs, reflects the signal back to the sending unit, where changes in the distance are computed....
thumbnail
Caption: This June 22 scene looking northeast at Washington state's Mount St. Helens volcano with Mount Rainier pictured to the left, show the fourth signigicant eruption of the Cascade Mountain Range volcano since it began awakening in late March 1980 after 123 years of silence. During the main eruption on May 18, 1980, the mountain ejected about 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock which fell over 11 western and central states. The force of the main eruption blast removed about 5,000 feet from the north face of the mountain and knocked down trees in a 185 square-mile area near the mountain. PIO No. 80-186d
thumbnail
Caption: Aerial view of Mount St. Helens 280m high lava dome with new lobe on the top. Photo taken from the south. Note Sprirt Lake and Mt. Rainier to the north. October 28, 1986. Photo taken by Lyn Topinka, U.S. Geological Survey, David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Washington. PIO No. 80-10281986
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens in more tranquil times. 1978 aerial view of Washington state's Mount St. Helens with Mount Rainier shown in the background. Two years later, the topopgraphy of the area was drastically changed by a major volcanic eruption. Mount St. Helens erupted violently on May 18, 1980 with a force equivalent to at least 500 Hiroshima-type atomic bombs, leveling approximately 150 square miles of timeberland. The volcano was estimated to have ejected approximately 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and other material during the main eruption. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced slightly more than one cubic kilometer in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Krakataua...
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens bulge has expanded to 80 feet. April 7, 1980 aerial view from the northeast, of Mount St. Helens showing one of many small ash and steam eruptions that occurred between the first eruption on March 27, 1980 and the violent eruption on May 18, 1980. USGS scientists estimate that mid-May explosion occurred with the energy equivalent of 10-50 megatons of TNT or roughly the same force as 500-2,500 atomic bombs similar to that dropped on Hiroshima at the end of WWII. The force of the eruption blast leveled about 150 square miles of forestland to the northeast and northwest of the mountain. The volcano ejected an estimated 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock (1.3 billion cubic yards) covering...
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens from Harry's Ridge. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. PIO No. MSH_misc01
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens dome enlarged by first eruption of year. The newly enlarged dome in the crater at Mount St. Helens is shown in this photograph taken four days after the March 19-20, 1982, eruption by U.S. Geological Survey scientists. The latest eruption was the first explosive eruption since October 1980. According to the USGS, the new portion of the dome is the darkened area that appears to be covering the upper left portion of the dome like a cap. The dome now stands about 680 feet above the crater floor. Before the last eruption, the dome measured 2,082 feet wide by 1,804 feet long. Detailed followup measurements have not been possible since the eruption. The latest eruptive activity began at 7:28...
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. March 28, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing ash and steam eruption that sent volcanic material almost two miles above the mountain's 9,677-foot peak. When the main eruption violently occurred seven weeks later on May 18, 1980, an estimated minimum of 1 cublic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano, according to USGS scientists. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius spewed slightly more than 1 cubic kilometer in its eruption in 79 A.D. that buried Pompeii. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883 produced over 20 cubic kilometers. The force of the volcanic blast on that Sunday morning in May, 1980, was estimated...
thumbnail
Caption: Three years later: Mount St. Helens remains active. Three years after the cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, U.S. Geological Survey scientists report that the volcano continues to produce many small emissions of gas and ash from the top of the lava dome that has been growing in the crater blasted out by the 1980 eruption. USGS scientists said these emissions have been frequent since late 1980 and are thought to be caused when ground water is heated beneath the dome and flashed into steam by hot rocks. Such emissions do not pose hazards outside the crater. The growth of the lava dome has continued intermittently since June 1980. By early May 1983, the dome was estimated to be about...
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens lava dome -- and confidence in eruption predictions -- grow. The newest extrusion of lava (center) during the September 6-7, 1981 eruption has added about 5 million cubic yards of new growth to the composite lava dome that is slowly filling the amphitheater-like crater of Mount St. Helens, according to U.S. Geological Survey scientists. USGS scientists said that the recent measurements indicate that the overall dome is now about 450 feet high, 1,950 feet long, and 1,600 feet wide. The present dome contains about 25 million cubic yards of gray-black lava and related debris. Steam and windblown ash commonly hover over the dome and often make visual observations difficult. Although the...
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens after the big blast. Aerial view of the north slope of Mount St. Helens volcano taken on May 30, 1980, shows the gapping hole produced by the atom-bomb like eruption blast on May 18, 1980. Over 5,000 feet of the north slope of the mountain was opened up with an explosive florce that was equal to 10-50 megatons of TNT, roughly the same force as 500-2,500 atomic bombs similar to that dropped on Hiroshima at the end of WWII. PIO No. 80-158 (2d)
thumbnail
Caption from model: Mount St. Helens, WA Post-Eruption. 3_D perspective view made from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) produced at USGS Western Mapping Center. Viewed from the Northeast. Link to Mount St. Helens, WA Pre-Eruption perspective view under Related Items below.
thumbnail
Caption: Three years later: Mount St. Helens remains active and watched. Three years after the cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey scientists continue to monitor the volcano and its actively growing lava dome. USGS observers are shown surveying the shape of the dome from inside the crater blasted out by the 1980 eruption. Bright orange targets are placed high on the dome and are surveyed from stations established on the crater floor, like this one 200 yards north of the dome. By monitoring the inflation or swelling of the lava dome as magma moves up into it, geologists can predict eruptions up to three weeks in advance. Between eruptions, the dome inflates less...
thumbnail
Caption: Eruption turns forestland into scene of destruction. The force of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington state knocked down and splintered trees in a 185 square mile area near the volcano. According to U.S. Geological Survey scientists, the first eruption of the Cascade Mountain Range volcano in 123 years occurred with an atom bomb-like force that leveled trees in a 185 square mile area and spewed over 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock over 11 western and central states. PIO No. 80-180a
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens has restored about 2 percent of what it lost in 1980. Mount St. Helens has started rebuilding itself after losing its top in the cataclysmic eruption five years ago on May 18, 1980, but still has a long way to go, according to U.S. Geological Survey scientists. The dome (shown in this photograph taken April 12, 1985) that has formed on the floor of the crater left by the 1980 eruption now contains an estimated 72 million cubic yards of material erupted as viscous lava from the depths of the volcano, said Norman MacLeod, scientist in charge of the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington. The volume of the dome is comparable to more than 2 percent of the more than one-half...
thumbnail
Handwritten notes on negative enclosure: MSH, 1983, from Harry's Ridge. 04-29-1983. Lynn Topinka, USGS/CVO. Similar to Lyn Topinka photograph number, msh00060 and PIO_83_43.
thumbnail
Caption: Mount St. Helens ash under glass. Sequence of scanning electron micrographs of volcanic ash from May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano dusted onto the head of an ordinary straight pin. Micrographs prepared at U.S. Geological Survey laboratories at the USGS National Center, Reston, Virginia. In left photo, magnification is about 30 times; in center, about 600 times; and in right, about 7000 times. The irregular, angular shape of the fine particles are clearly depicted. The smallest particles resolvable in the high magnification photograph is less than 1/10th of a micrometer (there are about 25 micrometers in 1/1000th of an inch). Sample was collected in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, about 200 miles...
thumbnail
Caption: Tree rings may help plan for future droughts in Northern Virginia. The narrow tree ring being studied on a highly magnified TV screen by U.S. Geological Survey botanist Dr. Richard Phipps shows that 1855 was a year of slow growth for a still-living hemlock tree in Dale City, Virginia, about 25 miles south of Washington, D.C. Phipps and his colleagues at the Tree Ring Laboratory, USGS National Center, Reston, Virginia, are trying to correlate such years of diminished growth with past droughts in Virginia to help water resources planners in Northern Virginia better estimate the probability of future water resource droughts. The USGS studies are concentrated in Occoquan River basin, which currently supplies...


map background search result map search result map Aerial view of Mount St. Helens still erupting. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens after the big blast. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Eruption of Mount St. Helens knocked down and splintered trees. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens ash under glass. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens eruptions continue in June. Skamania County, Washington. 1980 Mount St. Helens erupts again in June. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. USGS scientists use laser beams to keep watch on Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Scientists study changes around Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens 280m high lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1986. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens in more tranquil times. Skamania County, Washington. 1978. Mount St. Helens taken from Harry's Ridge. Skamania County, Washington. 1983. Mount St. Helens lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologists monitoring Mount St. Helens lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1982. Three years later: Mount St. Helens remains active. Skamania County, Washington. 1983. Mount St. Helens dome enlarged after 1982 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1982. Mount St. Helens, five years after 1980 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1985. USGS botanist, Dr. Richard Phipps, studying tree rings. Tree Ring Laboratory, Reston, Virginia. 1980. 3-D perspective view of Mount St. Helens, Post-Eruption. Washington. 1980. USGS botanist, Dr. Richard Phipps, studying tree rings. Tree Ring Laboratory, Reston, Virginia. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens still erupting. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens after the big blast. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Eruption of Mount St. Helens knocked down and splintered trees. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens ash under glass. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens eruptions continue in June. Skamania County, Washington. 1980 Mount St. Helens erupts again in June. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. USGS scientists use laser beams to keep watch on Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Scientists study changes around Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens 280m high lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1986. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens in more tranquil times. Skamania County, Washington. 1978. Mount St. Helens taken from Harry's Ridge. Skamania County, Washington. 1983. Mount St. Helens lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologists monitoring Mount St. Helens lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1982. Three years later: Mount St. Helens remains active. Skamania County, Washington. 1983. Mount St. Helens dome enlarged after 1982 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1982. Mount St. Helens, five years after 1980 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1985. 3-D perspective view of Mount St. Helens, Post-Eruption. Washington. 1980.