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Caption: April 10, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens from the west, showing one of several small steam and ash eruptions that occurred during the day. This eruption occurred about two weeks after the initial eruption on March 27, 1980 at this Cascade Mountain Range volcano and five weeks before the major eruption on May 18, 1980. USGS scientists have estimated that a minimum of one cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano during that Sunday morning eruption. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius produced slightly more than one cubic kilometer in its eruption that buried Pompeii in 79 A.D. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883 produced about 20 cubic kilometers of ash....
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Caption: Mount St. Helens sends ash plume two miles high. March 28, 1980 aerial view of Mount St. Helens showing ash and steam eruption that sent volcanic material almost two miles above the mountain's 9,677-foot peak. When the main eruption violently occurred seven weeks later on May 18, 1980, an estimated minimum of 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of ash and rock was ejected by the volcano, according to USGS scientists. In comparison, Mt. Vesuvius spewed slightly more than 1 cubic kilometer in its eruption in 79 A.D. that buried Pompeii. The eruption of Indonesia's Krakataua in 1883 produced over 20 cubic kilometers. The force of the volcanic blast on that Sunday morning in May 1980, was estimated...
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Caption: Huge crater left by Mount St. Helens eruption. The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington State produced a crater at the mountain approximately one kilometer wide and two kilometers long. According to U.S. Geological Survey scientists, the atom bomb-like force of the main eruption also exploded out about 5,000 feet of the north face of the mountain and leveled trees in a 185 square mile area. The volcano last erupted 123 years ago. PIO No. 80-179.
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Caption: Mount St. Helens levels 185 square miles of forestland. Thousands of trees knocked down by the atom bomb-like blast of the May 18, 1980, eruption of southern Washington state's Mount St. Helens volcano are shown in this photo taken near the mountain several weeks after the main eruption. According to U.S. Geological Survey scientists, the Cascade Mountain Range volcano's first eruption in 123 years leveled trees in a 185 square mile area and spewed about 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock which fell over 11 western and central states. August 1980. PIO No. 80-180c
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Caption: Scientist surveys Mount St. Helens damage. Volcano damage at debris and ash clogged stream near Mount St. Helens in Washington state is examined by U.S. Geological Survey scientist after the mountain exploded violently on May 18, 1980. Over one cubic kilometer of ash and rock were ejected by the Cascade Mount Range volcano during its first eruption in 123 years. The eruption, which leveled a 185-square mile area, spread volcanic debris up to several hundred feet thick in some places. PIO 80-180g
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Typed caption on back of photograph: Ship Rock, San Juan City, NM. PIO No. 81-85
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Caption: Mount St. Helens bluge has expanded 80 feet. April 7, 1980 aerial view from the north of Mount St. Helens showing Mt. Hood (left) and Mt. Jefferson (right) in the foreground. The "bulge" area can be seen in the center of the photo and appears to have a noticeably cracked surface. USGS scientists announced on April 30, 1980 about 2 weeks before the large eruption on May 18, 1980 that this area had risen at least 80 feet, most of it apparently since the initial phases of the eruption began in late March. They indicated that the rise was suspected to be caused by several factors including the upward movement of magna. When the major eruption occurred in mid-May, the bulge area and an additional 5, 000...
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Information from USGS Public Information Office, PIO No. 78-77 release statement, dated July 19, 1978: First Geological Map of Mars. Dr. David H., Scott, geologist at the U.S. Geologicla Survey's Center of Astrogeology, Flagstaff, Arizona, points to the first geologic map of the entire surface of the planet Mars. The full color map show the distribution of the various kinds of rock materials, landforms, and structures - mountains, craters, plains, channels, canyons, faults, and fractures - that characterize the planet, and covers a total area of about 55,700,000 square miles or more than 18 times the area of the conterminous (48) United States at a scale of 1:25,000,000 (1 inch to about 400 miles). The map was...
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Caption: Geologist still missing at Mount St. Helens. Dr. David A. Johnston, 30, volcanologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California, is one of several people missing in the wake of Sunday's (May 18, 1980) violent eruption of Mount St. Helens Volcano. Johnston, shown labeling volcanic ash samples from an eruption several weeks ago, was monitoring the volcano's activity from an observation post about 5 miles north of the volcano. Last radio contact was on Sunday morning, shortly before the eruption. Several helicopter flights over the area have been unable to locate him or signs of the observation post. The post appears to have been hard hit by the initial direct blast from the volcano. The area...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens forms two craters. March 31 aerial view of the ash-laden Mount St. Helens showing the two craters formed after the initial eruption on March 27. The craters measure approximately 300' x 450' and 90' x 150' and were contained in the original summit crater prior to the largest eruption on May 18. Unlike the relatively mild earlier eruption, the May 18 event was violent and destructive. Over 5,000 feet of the upper north flank of the mountain was opened up by the force of the explosion, which was termed comparable to the energy output of 10-50 megatons of TNT--about 500-2,500 times more powerful than the atomic blast at Hiroshima at the end of WWII. The ash and rock ejected by the volcano...
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Typed caption on back of photograph: Eruption of Mayon Volcano, Philippines, April 24, 1968. PIO No. 81-57A.
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Caption: Scenic view of Mount St. Helens. 1981 Stamped on back of photograph: Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, Photo File No. PIO-81-121 (5b).
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Caption: Volcanic eruption creates scenes of destruction. Ash, pumice, pieces of wood and other volcanic debris clogged many water bodies near Washington State's Mount St. Helens after the volcano erupted violently on May 18, 1980. According to U.S. Geological Survey scientists, the first eruption of the Cascade Mountain Range volcano in 123 years occured with an atom bomb-like force that leveled trees in a 185 square mile area and spewed over 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock over 11 western and central states. PIO No. 80-180b
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Caption: Scientists studying hydrologic effects of Mount St. Helens eruption. Hydrologic analysdis including water flow rate, chemical composition, and temperature are shown being made by U.S. Geological Survey scientists near Washington state's Mount St. Helens volcano. The first eruption of the Cascade Mountain Range volcano in 123 years caused flooding and pollution of the waterways near the mountain. Studies such as these provide data that will help in preparations for future volcanic eruptions throughout the U.S. and other countries. According to the USGS, over 1 cubic kilometer of ash and rock were ejectd by the volcano during its main eruption on May 18, 1980. Measureable amounts of volcanic material were...
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Caption: Explosive Mount St. Helens. Aerial view from the west of Mount St. Helens volcano, Washington, shortly after the violent eruption of Sunday morning, May 18, 1980. USGS scientists estimate that the minimum volume of ash and rock ejected during the May 18 eruption amounted to about 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards) of material. The estimate is based on an assumption that the new crater formed by the blast at Mount St. Helens measures about 1 kilometer wide, 2 kilometers long, and at least 0.3 kilometers deep. If the May 18 eruption did produce as much as estimated, USGS sceintists say, the volume would be about equal to the estimated volume of volcanic materials ejected by Mount St. Helens in...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens lava dome -- and confidence in eruption predictions -- grow. The newest extrusion of lava (center) duirng the September 6-7, 1981 eruption has added about 5 million cubic yards of new growth to the composite lava dome that is slowly filling the amphitheater-like crater of Mount St. Helens, according to U.S. Geological Survey scientists. USGS scientists said that the recent measurements indicate that the overall dome is now about 450 feet high, 1,950 feet long, and 1,600 feet wide. The present dome contains about 25 million cubic yards of gray-black lava and related debris. Steam and windblown ash commonly hover over the dome and often make visual observations difficult. Although the...
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Caption: Mount St. Helens forms single crater. April 6, 1980 aerial view from the north of Mount St. Helens showing the single crater that was formed from the two separeate, smaller craters created in the mountain's summit crater. The violent eruption that occured on May 18, 1980 opened and extended the crater on the north side of the mountain from the 9,677-foot level to the 4,400-foot level with a force that was estimated to be the equivalent of 10-50 megatons of TNT or about as powerful as 600-2,500 of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima at the end of WWII. The amount of ash and rock ejected by the volcano was estimated by USGS scientists to be about 1 cubic kilometer (1.3 billion cubic yards). In comparison,...


map background search result map search result map Scenic view of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. David A. Johnston, USGS volcanologist, studying specimen from Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of explosive Mount St. Helens shorty after eruption. Skamania County, Washington. May 18, 1980. Mount St. Helens vents its fury. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens bulge expansion. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Huge crater left by Mount St. Helens eruptions. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Volcanic debris clogged many water bodies near Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens levels 185 square miles of forestland. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. USGS scientist surveys volcano damage at stream near Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980 USGS scientists study hydrologic effects of Mount St. Helens eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Ship Rock, San Juan City, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. 1981. Aerial view of the eruption of Mayon Volcano. Phillippines. 1968. David A. Johnston, USGS volcanologist, missing after Mount St. Helens eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. USGS scientists at work. Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens forms single crater. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens emits steam and ash. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens shows ash and steam eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of ash-laden Mount St. Helens from the northwest showing the two craters formed initial eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Scenic view of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. David A. Johnston, USGS volcanologist, studying specimen from Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of explosive Mount St. Helens shorty after eruption. Skamania County, Washington. May 18, 1980. Mount St. Helens vents its fury. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens bulge expansion. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Huge crater left by Mount St. Helens eruptions. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Volcanic debris clogged many water bodies near Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens levels 185 square miles of forestland. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. USGS scientist surveys volcano damage at stream near Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980 USGS scientists study hydrologic effects of Mount St. Helens eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. David A. Johnston, USGS volcanologist, missing after Mount St. Helens eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. USGS scientists at work. Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens forms single crater. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens emits steam and ash. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Mount St. Helens lava dome. Skamania County, Washington. 1981. Aerial view of Mount St. Helens shows ash and steam eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of ash-laden Mount St. Helens from the northwest showing the two craters formed initial eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Ship Rock, San Juan City, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. 1981. Aerial view of the eruption of Mayon Volcano. Phillippines. 1968.