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Slide desription and index card (10ct and 11ct): Paintings showing a comparison of the shape of Mount St. Helens (A) at the time of the March 27 eruption and (B) just before the May 18 eruption shows the large outward displacement of the bulge area. The view here is from the northeast. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. (Graphics on published photos only) (Paintings by Dee Molenaar). Photo no. 10ct published as Figure 15-A and photo no. 11ct published as Figure 15-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Aerial photographs of the lava dome that extruded into the crater of Mount St. Helens during the latter part of June 1980.The volcano's dacite lava has a pasty consistency when it is molten, and it tends to pile up rather than to flow laterally. This dome, which was largely destroyed in a subsequent eruption on July 22, 1980, was, at this stage, about 1,200 feet across and 200 feet high. Its rough, shattered appearance resulted mainly from the expansion and shattering of the solidified outer crust as more molten lava was forced upward by the great pressure in the magma chamber underlying the volcano. B, View from the west over the crater rim from a helicopter taking geologists to...
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Slide description and index card: Effects of the May 18 mudflows in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. C, Mudflows destroyed nearly all the bridges that crossed streams draining from the northern, northeastern, and northwestern parts of Mount St. Helens. This lack of stream crossings greatly hampered ground rescue and recovery efforts. The steel highway bridge shown in photo no. 35ct (msh_1249_00035_ct) was formerly at the site shown in this photo, on the North Fork Toutle River 23 miles downstream from headwaters on Mount St. Helens. Aerial view. Cowlitz County, Washington. May 20, 1980. (Photo by Philip Carpenter). Published as Figure 31-C in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Fieldwork in the avalanche deposit. A, Geologist collecting samples at a weakly steaming fumarole in the May 18 debris-avalanche deposit. The view here is eastward; the fumarole is in the valley of the North Fork Toutle River, just south of the destroyed Coldwater II observation site and about 5 miles north-northeast of the crater's center. The debris-avalanche deposit, derived from the upper northern side of the mountain, here is about 300 feet thick. Part of a new pond, covered with floating pumice and wood debris, is at the lower right. Skamania County, Washington. June 7, 1980. (Photo by David Frank). Published as Figure 47-A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional...
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Slide description and index card: Scenic view of Mount St. Helens from Goat Marsh Lake, 5 miles southwest of the peak which is reflected in the lake. Skamania County, Washington. 1978. (Photo by Dwight R. Crandell). Published as Figure 4, lower photo, in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Index card: Erupted plumes of ash and steam (and minor amounts of other gases) were carried from the crater by winds and sometimes streamed down the flanks of Mount St. Helens for considerable distances. Spectacular displays of lightning occasionally were generated in these ground-hugging plumes by charges of static electricity built up when ash particles rubbed against one another in the turbulent cloud. View from the northwest. Skamania County, Washington. April 8, 1980. (Photo by David P. Dethier). Published as Figure 11 in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: The "new," shorter Mount St. Helens. A, The first opportunity for a broad view of Mount St. Helens after the May 18 eruption came on May 22 when clouds that had obscured the area since the eruption parted to reveal the stubbed-off, hollowed-out volcano, newly coated with 4 to 6 inches of snow. This photograph looking into the open mouth of the amphitheaterlike crater was taken from an airplane about 3 miles north-northwest of the crater's center at an altitude of 6,000 to 7,000 feet. The new 8,364-foot "summit" of the mountain (the highest part of the crater rim on the southwestern side) was obscured by vapor clouds. Skamania County, Washington. May 22, 1980. (Part of plane wing...
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Index card: Oblique aerial view of Swift Reservoir. Notice the mud and rocks deposited in the reservoir, and that the water at this point in time is still relatively clear. On the left bank (background) of the reservoir one can see several vacation-type homes which barely escaped the mudflows entering the reservoir. Skamania County, Washington. May 19, 1980. (Same as MSH-PP 1249 no. 37ct (msh_1249_00037_ct)). Published as Figure 33 in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Debris from the May 18 eruption in the valley of the North Fork Toutle River. B, Stream eroding a new channel in avalanche and mudflow deposits in the valley of the North Fork Toutle River. This kind of erosion will go on for years, or even decades, until the stream network reestablishes itself into a new, stable system. Cowlitz County, Washington. June 23, 1980. (Photo by Edwin McGavock). Published as Figure 59-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Aerial views of the Mount St. Helens crater and eruptions from the north and northwest. C, These phreatic eruptions seemed to grow in slow motion because of the immensity of the scene. Some were powerful enough to throw out automibile-sized blocks of rock and ice. Skamania County, Washington. April 10, 1980. (Photo by John Whetten). Published as Figure 14-C in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: On May 17, volcanologist David Johnston collected gas samples from a fumarole recently found high on the unstable north-side bulge (shown by arrow on published photo only). Aerial view of summit of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. (Photo by David Frank). Published as Figure 20-A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Index card: A hot spot in the pyroclastic flows; geologist J.R. Williams examines a fumarole area within the cooler avalanche deposit at the northern base of Mount St. Helens. Sulphur stains on the pumice; note the relatively small particle size of the material. Rocks are very dense and hot; heat was derived from hot rock material buried within the deposit. Skamania or Cowlitz County, Washington. June 5, 1980. (Same as MSH-PP 1249 40ct). Published as Figure 37-A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: David A. Johnston and assistant Harry Glicken were lifted by helicopter to a precarious landsite nearby. This is a distant view of Johnston crouched at the edge of the fumarole high on the unstable north-side bulge and collecting the gas samples. Skamania County, Washington. May 17, 1980. (Photo by Harry Glicken). Same as MSH-BE-VOLC no. 17ct (msh_boe_volc0017_ct). Published as Figure 20-B in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Effects of the May 18 mudflows in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. A, The mudflow in the South Fork Toutle River reached Camp 12 logging camp (27 miles downstream from headwaters on Mount St. Helens) about 1 hour and 40 minutes after the start of the May 18 eruption and left a tangled mass of logs and heavy equipment. Aerial view. Cowlitz County, Washington. May 20, 1980. (Photo by Philip Carpenter). Published as Figure 31-A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Mount St. Helens pyroclastic deposits. A, Geologists R.P. Hoblitt of the USGS (left) and Edward Graeber, Jr., of Sandia Laboratories (right) use of thermocouple probe to measure the temperature in a pumice slope north of Mount St. Helens. Although the pumice at the surface was cool enough to walk on, at a depth of a few inches it was hot enough to boil water. Skamania County, Washington. May 30, 1980. (Photo by Terry Leighley, Sandia Laboratories). Published as Figure 38-A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card (57ct and 58ct): Painted views of Mount St. Helens and Spirit Lake from the north-northeast before (A) and after (B) the eruptions of May and June 1980. The dashed outline shows how much of the original volcano cone was lost during the early part of the May 18 eruption. Spirit Lake in B is now more extensive and shallower, and its shoreline is about 200 feet highter than it was formerly. The lake now is choked with thousanmds of logs blown into it by the initial blast. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. (Paintings by Dee Molenaar). Published as Figures 53-A and 53-B, respectively, in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Aerial view of the "crater within a crater" between the May 25 eruption and the June 12 eruption, looking into the north-facing mouth of the main crater from the northeast. The smooth slope in the right foreground is a rampart of pyroclastic debris and ash that built up in front of the main eruption center, which is at the base of the large steam plume. The rock ridge on the left side is old volcanic rock, formerly buried, that was exposed for the first time in centuries by the May 18 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. June 4, 1980. (Photo by Terry Leighley, Sandia Laboratories). Published as Figure 46 in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Photograph of Mount St. Helens before the May 18, 1980 eruption, taken from exactly the same spot as photo MSH-Rosenbaum, J.G. no. 120 (msh_rj000120_ct), at Coldater II observation station, 5.7 miles north-northwest of the peak. Skamania County, Washington. May 17, 1980. (Photo by Harry Glicken). Published as frontispiece, bottom photo, in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Life returns to the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. A, Ferns and other small plants push up through a blanket of ash 4 inches thick on the southern flank, 3 weeks after the May 18 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. June 1980. (Photo by J.R. Stroh, U.S. Soil Conservation Service). Published as Figure 57-A in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1949. 1982.
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Slide description and index card: Aerial view of the Mount St. Helens crater and eruptions from the north and northwest. E, By April 10, eruptions were coming from a single circular vent (shown by an arrow on published photo only) in the lowest part of the crater and almost directly below the position of the crater first seen on March 29. Traces of what probably was another, but now-dormant, vent can be seen to the right of the active vent, here steaming weakly. The active vent was about 30 feet across. Skamania County, Washington. April 10, 1980. (Photo by John Whetten). Published as Figure 14-E in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional Paper 1249. 1982.


map background search result map search result map Oblique aerial view of Swift Reservoir. Mount St.Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologist J.R. Williams examines a fumarole area. Mount St. Helens, Washington. 1980. Photograph of Mount St. Helens before the May 18, 1980 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Scenic view of Mount St. Helens from Goat Marsh Lake. Skamania County, Washington. 1978. Aerial view of the Mount St. Helens crater and eruptions from the north and northwest. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of the Mount St. Helens crater and eruptions from the north and northwest. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Paintings showing a comparison of the shape of Mount St. Helens at the time of the March 27 eruption, and just before the May 18 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of summit of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Distant view of David A. Johnston crouched at the edge of the Mount St. Helens fumarole. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Effects of the May 18 mudflows in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. Cowlitz County, Washington. 1980. Effects of the May 18 mudflows in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. Cowlitz County, Washington. 1980. Geologists using a thermocouple probe to measure pumice slope temperature. Mount St. Helen, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. A few days after the May 18 eruption, Mount St. Helens appeared stubbed off and hollowed out. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of the "crater within a crater" between the May 25 eruption and the June 12 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologist collecting samples at a weakly steaming fumarole in the May 18 debris-avalanche deposit. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view from the west over the crater rim from a helicopter taking geologists to collect samples and measure temperatures inside the crater. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Painting of Mount St. Helens and Spirit Lake before the May and June eruptions. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Ferns and other small plants push up through a blanket of ash 4 inches thick on the southern flank of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Stream eroding a new channel in avalanche and mudflow deposits in the North Fork Toutle River valley. Mount St. Helens, Cowlitz County, Washington. 1980. Erupted plumes of ash and stream. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Effects of the May 18 mudflows in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. Cowlitz County, Washington. 1980. Effects of the May 18 mudflows in the vicinity of Mount St. Helens. Cowlitz County, Washington. 1980. Stream eroding a new channel in avalanche and mudflow deposits in the North Fork Toutle River valley. Mount St. Helens, Cowlitz County, Washington. 1980. Oblique aerial view of Swift Reservoir. Mount St.Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Photograph of Mount St. Helens before the May 18, 1980 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Scenic view of Mount St. Helens from Goat Marsh Lake. Skamania County, Washington. 1978. Aerial view of the Mount St. Helens crater and eruptions from the north and northwest. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of the Mount St. Helens crater and eruptions from the north and northwest. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Paintings showing a comparison of the shape of Mount St. Helens at the time of the March 27 eruption, and just before the May 18 eruption. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of summit of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Distant view of David A. Johnston crouched at the edge of the Mount St. Helens fumarole. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologists using a thermocouple probe to measure pumice slope temperature. Mount St. Helen, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. A few days after the May 18 eruption, Mount St. Helens appeared stubbed off and hollowed out. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view of the "crater within a crater" between the May 25 eruption and the June 12 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologist collecting samples at a weakly steaming fumarole in the May 18 debris-avalanche deposit. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Aerial view from the west over the crater rim from a helicopter taking geologists to collect samples and measure temperatures inside the crater. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Painting of Mount St. Helens and Spirit Lake before the May and June eruptions. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Ferns and other small plants push up through a blanket of ash 4 inches thick on the southern flank of Mount St. Helens. Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Erupted plumes of ash and stream. Mount St. Helens, Skamania County, Washington. 1980. Geologist J.R. Williams examines a fumarole area. Mount St. Helens, Washington. 1980.