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Abstract (from SpringerLink): Western climate science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) represent complementary and overlapping views of the causes and consequences of change. In particular, observations of changes in abundance, distribution, phenology, or behavior of the natural environment (including plants and animals) can have a rich cultural and spiritual interpretation in Indigenous communities that may not be present in western science epistemologies. Using interviews with Indigenous elders and other Traditional Knowledge holders, we demonstrate that assumptions about the nature, perception, and utilization of time and timing can differ across knowledge systems in regard to climate change.Our interviewees’...
This presentation provides an overview of the year-round migrations of the Cui-ui and Lahontan cutthroat trout within Pyramid Lake. This was developed for the "Climate Change Vulnerability of Native Americans in the Southwest" research project, funded by the USGS Southwest Climate Science Center.
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Tribal nations are one of the most vulnerable populations to climate change in the United States, because of their reliance upon the natural environment to sustain traditional ways of life and current lack of training and resources to respond to climate change impacts. This project sought to increase south-central U.S. tribes’ basic knowledge of climate science, connect them with tools to assess their communities’ vulnerabilities, and build their skills to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. Researchers conducted multiple two-day climate training sessions for Native American tribes in Louisiana and New Mexico. The trainings emphasized regionally specific scientific and social scientific aspects of climate...
In addition to the major projects funded by the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC), selected through its solicitation process or the directed funds going to the foundational Science Areas, there remains a need within the north central domain to support work that builds capacity among stakeholders that have been otherwise left out of the major projects funded by the NC CSC. During the course of this project, we focused on stakeholder capacity building by providing regional offerings of climate-related courses for resource managers, supporting tribal college students and deploying technology to better understand how climate impacts living things, and supporting strategic scientific study of the climate/energy/environment...
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Several times during the severe drought of 2010-2015, communities within the jurisdictional territories of the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma were precariously close to running out of water. According to previous studies, temperatures are expected to continue to rise throughout the southern states, and droughts are predicted to be longer and more severe. Even small changes to a river’s water flow regime may have unanticipated consequences on the water resources, especially for communities that rely on direct river diversions to supply their needs. A suitable water availability model is a key tool needed to help communities investigate where vulnerabilities in water resources may occur and the...
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Daily streamflow and reservoir water elevation data for modeled locations in the Red River Basin. Values reported are for 18 different GCM (Global Climate Model) / RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) / GDM Downscaling scenarios. Climate data from each scenario was input into a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, that output flow values. These values were then input into RiverWare, to determine the impacts on regulated flows, lake levels and water availability. RiverWare was used for this project, because of its ability to simulate water use, reservoir operations, and local/interstate regulations.
Abstract (from AFS): Managing recreational fisheries in lake‐rich landscapes with diverse fish communities and anglers alike presents a social and biological challenge for managers. Understanding angler preferences is central to navigating these challenges and can aid in predicting shifts in angler behavior in response to management actions or changing fish populations. Species‐specific angler surveys do not incorporate tradeoffs inherent in multispecies fisheries, thus limiting their application to real‐world management issues. To better understand angler preferences in relation to realistic tradeoffs among different fishing opportunities, we conducted a survey of Wisconsin anglers in 2013–2014 that included questions...
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Maple syrup is produced from the sap of sugar maple collected in the late winter and early spring. Native American tribes have collected and boiled down sap for centuries, and the tapping of maple trees is a cultural touchstone for many people in the northeast and Midwest. Because the tapping season is dependent on weather conditions, there is concern about the sustainability of maple sugaring as climate changes throughout the region. Our research addresses the impact of climate on the quantity and quality of maple sap used to make maple syrup. Sap was sampled at 6 sites across the native range of sugar maple over 2 years as part of the ACERnet collaboration. At each site we sampled 15-25 mature sugar maple trees,...
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Tribal nations in the Pacific Northwest have distinctive, long-standing relationships with their aboriginal lands and associated resources. These relationships are being disrupted by changing climate conditions. Most scientific information about changes in forests and other ecosystems have not been directed toward addressing the concerns of tribal communities. For example, they lack culturally-specific information pertaining to tribal knowledge systems, cultural practices, livelihoods, food and water security, and economies. Furthermore, ensuring that research is conducted in ways that are relevant to tribes is difficult when those who produce these studies lack experience in working with tribes, and are unfamiliar...
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Native Nations face unique challenges related to climate change. Native Americans have a deep connection to the natural environment within which their livelihoods, cultural identity, and spiritual practices are rooted. Changes to water flow and hydrology, landscapes, and ecosystems, in combination with socio-economic and other factors, amplify tribal vulnerabilities to climate change. In the Southwest, tribes are already experiencing a range of impacts that are at least partially related to climate change. They include serious water quality and supply issues in the context of prolonged drought; reduced ability to grow or collect important traditional crops and raw materials; loss of forest resources from large and...
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The Red River Basin is a vital source of water in the South Central U.S., supporting ecosystems, drinking water, agriculture, tourism and recreation, and cultural ceremonies. Stretching from the High Plains of New Mexico eastward to the Mississippi River, the Red River Basin encompasses parts of five states – New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. Further, 74% of the jurisdictional boundaries of the Chickasaw and Choctaw Tribes are located within the basin. Water resources in the basin have been stressed in recent years due to a multi-year drought and increasing demands for consumptive use by metropolitan areas in Oklahoma and Texas. Unfortunately, currently available projections of future precipitation...
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The Climate Adaptation Science Centers have conducted numerous training and skills development activities to support tribal and indigenous partners as they seek to use scientific information and techniques to understand and respond to climate change impacts. Because these activities were generated in different CASC regions, with different tribal / indigenous stakeholders, climate change contexts, and training needs, and because the CASC network encourages innovation, these activities were not developed or implemented in a nationally consistent format. This project seeks to identify relevant activities, gather related materials and links that might benefit others seeking to implement similar activities, provide a...
Abstract (from DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln): Native American peoples of the Northern and Central Plains have long endured harsh climate conditions, such as floods and droughts, and they possess valuable traditional knowledges that have enhanced their resilience to these extreme events. However, in recent times, limited capacity to adapt to a rapidly changing climate combined with a lack of resources have increased tribes’ vulnerability to climate extremes and their associated impacts. In response, a number of projects have been developed to assist tribes with their self-identified climate- and drought-related needs, particularly in the context of on-reservation decision-making. In this case study,...
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Daily streamflow and reservoir water elevation data for modeled locations in the Red River Basin. Values reported are for 18 different GCM (Global Climate Model) / RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) / GDM Downscaling scenarios. Climate data from each scenario was input into a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, that output flow values. These values were then input into RiverWare, to determine the impacts on regulated flows, lake levels and water availability. RiverWare was used for this project, because of its ability to simulate water use, reservoir operations, and local/interstate regulations.
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Daily streamflow and reservoir water elevation data for modeled locations in the Red River Basin. Values reported are for 18 different GCM (Global Climate Model) / RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) / GDM Downscaling scenarios. Climate data from each scenario was input into a Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, that output flow values. These values were then input into RiverWare, to determine the impacts on regulated flows, lake levels and water availability. RiverWare was used for this project, because of its ability to simulate water use, reservoir operations, and local/interstate regulations.
Abstract (from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002216941400225X): This study assesses the latest version, Version 7 (V7) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) rainfall estimates by comparison with the previous version, Version 6 (V6), for both near-real-time product (3B42RT) and post-real-time research products (3B42) over the climate-transitional zone in the southern Great Plains, USA. Two basins, the Verdigris River Basin (VRB) in the east and the Upper Washita Basin (UWB) in the west, with distinctive precipitation but similar vegetation and elevation, were selected to evaluate the TMPA products using rain gauge-blended products with WSR-88D...
Hydrologic extremes of drought and flooding stress water resources and damage communities in the Red River basin, located in the south-central United States. For example, the summer of 2011 was the third driest summer in Oklahoma state history and the driest in Texas state history. When the long-term drought conditions ended in the spring of 2015 as El Niño brought record precipitation to the region, there were also catastrophic floods that caused loss of life and property. Hydrologic extremes such as these have occurred throughout the historical record, but decision-makers need to know how the frequency of these events is expected to vary in a changing climate so that they can mitigate these impacts and losses....


map background search result map search result map Impacts of Climate Change on Water Flows in the Red River Basin Climate Training for Native Tribes of Louisiana and New Mexico Building Partnerships to Assess Tribal Adaptation to Climate Change and Science Needs in the Southwest RiverWare Daily Simulated values of Streamflow from 2006-2099: Arkansas RiverWare Daily Simulated values of Streamflow from 2006-2099: Oklahoma RiverWare Daily Simulated values of Streamflow from 2006-2099: Texas Examining the Effects of Climate on American Indian Uses of Forests in Pacific Northwest and Northern California Sap Quality at Study Sites in the Northeast Synthesis of CASC-Led Climate Training Activities for Tribes and Indigenous Communities Building Tools to Assess Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources of the Canadian River Basin RiverWare Daily Simulated values of Streamflow from 2006-2099: Arkansas RiverWare Daily Simulated values of Streamflow from 2006-2099: Oklahoma RiverWare Daily Simulated values of Streamflow from 2006-2099: Texas Impacts of Climate Change on Water Flows in the Red River Basin Examining the Effects of Climate on American Indian Uses of Forests in Pacific Northwest and Northern California Climate Training for Native Tribes of Louisiana and New Mexico Sap Quality at Study Sites in the Northeast Building Tools to Assess Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources of the Canadian River Basin Building Partnerships to Assess Tribal Adaptation to Climate Change and Science Needs in the Southwest Synthesis of CASC-Led Climate Training Activities for Tribes and Indigenous Communities