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Filters: Tags: Tribes and Tribal Organizations (X) > Types: Map Service (X) > partyWithName: Northwest CSC (X) > partyWithName: Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASC) Program (X)

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The Schitsu'umsh people (Coeur d’Alene Tribe of Idaho) have an intimate relationship with their landscape and a rich knowledge of how to interact with the environment in a way that benefits human, plant, and animal communities alike. Such knowledge and practices can provide valuable insight as to how tribal and non-tribal resource managers, communities, and governments can best respond to the effects of a changing climate. This project was a pilot effort to collect and translate indigenous knowledge and practices into shareable formats. Researchers developed documents, images, lesson plans, and innovative, interactive 3-D virtual reality simulations that effectively convey Schitsu’umsh knowledge and practices and...
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For thousands of years, Pacific lamprey and Pacific eulachon have been important traditional foods for Native American tribes of the Columbia River Basin and coastal areas of Oregon and Washington. These fish have large ranges – spending part of their lives in the ocean and part in freshwater streams – and they require specific environmental conditions to survive, migrate, and reproduce. For these reasons, Pacific lamprey and Pacific eulachon are likely threatened by a variety of climate change impacts to both their ocean and freshwater habitats. However, to date, little research has explored these impacts, despite the importance of these species to tribal communities. This project will evaluate the effects of...
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The Columbia River Basin and the plants and animals it supports have been central to tribal culture and economy in the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, and British Columbia) for thousands of years. Climate change is expected to significantly alter the ecology of the Columbia River Basin, and tribal communities will be especially sensitive to these changes, including possible loss of culturally and economically significant foods such as salmon, deer, root plants, and berries. The purpose of this project was to assess the capacity of tribal communities and organizations in the Columbia River Basin to prepare for and respond to climate change. Researchers surveyed 15 tribes and three...
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Tribes in the Pacific Northwest rely on plants for food, medicine, and material for culturally important items (e.g., baskets, cages and traps, ceremonial items, tools, and musical instruments). Elders and wisdomkeepers from tribes of the Point No Point Treaty Council have expressed deep concerns about the potential effects of climate change on plant species of key cultural significance, particularly those located in tribal gathering areas on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. This project was a direct response to tribal concerns about the loss of culturally significant plants from tribal gathering areas. Researchers conducted interviews with elders from the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe to identify eight plants...
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The Klamath Basin in Oregon and California is home to a rich abundance of natural and cultural resources, many of which are vulnerable to present and future climate change. Climate change also threatens traditional ways of life for tribal communities, who have deep connections to the region. This project sought to increase the effectiveness of regional climate change adaptation and planning by (1) developing ways to integrate traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with western science in decision making, (2) building partnerships between tribal, academic, and government institutions, and (3) increasing future capacity to respond to climate change by engaging tribal youth. Through this project, the Quartz Valley...
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Preparing for and responding to the impacts of climate change are critical to the wellbeing of tribal communities that rely on natural resources to sustain their families, communities, traditional ways of life, and cultural identities. Recognizing this, efforts across the country are underway to support and enhance the capacity of tribes to prepare for climate change risks. However, due to staffing, technical, and financial limitations, many tribes continue to experience difficulty initiating and completing the critical first step of the climate adaptation planning process: a “climate change vulnerability assessment”, i.e., a structured assessment of the specific potential impacts of climate change that the tribe...
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Tribal communities have spiritually rich and complex connections with the natural environment, and their traditions, identities, and economies rely heavily on local natural resources. Because of this intimate connection with nature, tribes are especially vulnerable to climate changes that disrupt their surroundings. Surprisingly, however, few studies have delved deeply into Native thinking around climate change and its cultural impacts. This project sought to understand the ways in which Native American culture and cultural practices in the northwestern U.S. have been affected by climate change. Researchers conducted in-depth interviews with tribal elders and cultural experts belonging to three Northwest tribes...
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Tribal communities’ traditions, identities, and economies rely heavily on local natural resources, making tribes especially vulnerable to climate change impacts, including changes in seasonal patterns and the potential loss of culturally and economically important species. The goal of this project was to build tribal capacity in the Pacific Northwest to successfully plan for and adapt to the effects of climate change. The funds associated with this project supported the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change held on March 10-11, 2015 in Portland, Oregon. The summit gathered tribal leaders to discuss climate change impacts; share tribal strategies, plans, and policies;...


    map background search result map search result map Vulnerability of Culturally Significant Plants on the Olympic Peninsula Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Pacific Lamprey and Pacific Eulachon Building Collaboration in the Klamath Basin Through Tribal Youth Internships Assessing the Cultural Effects of Climate Change on Northwest Tribes Collecting and Applying Schitsu’umsh Indigenous Knowledge and Practices to Climate Change Decision Making Assessing the Capacity of Columbia River Basin Tribes to Address Climate Change Support for the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change Building Tribal Capacity to Assess Vulnerability to Climate Change Vulnerability of Culturally Significant Plants on the Olympic Peninsula Building Collaboration in the Klamath Basin Through Tribal Youth Internships Collecting and Applying Schitsu’umsh Indigenous Knowledge and Practices to Climate Change Decision Making Support for the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change Assessing the Capacity of Columbia River Basin Tribes to Address Climate Change Assessing Climate Change Impacts on Pacific Lamprey and Pacific Eulachon Assessing the Cultural Effects of Climate Change on Northwest Tribes Building Tribal Capacity to Assess Vulnerability to Climate Change