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The increasing demand for bioenergy in the United States necessitates detailed case studies of cost and supply to assess its feasibility. We have developed supply curves based on six feedstocks in five counties surrounding the Yakama Nation in central Washington using spatially explicit estimates of supply and transportation cost. The supply curves were used to examine a base case supply for a bioenergy plant, to analyze the effects of land ownership, and examine the impacts of uncertainty in parameters used to determine cost and supply. The results show that existing industries produce the cheapest supply of feedstock as a byproduct of their operations, while supplies harvested specifically for bioenergy are considerably...
Native Americans in the Southwest United States are thought to be particularly vulnerable to climate change. Tribal resiliency to climate change can be affected by multiple climate-related threats and by tribal communities’ close reliance on natural resources for sustenance, economic development, and maintenance of cultural traditions. A scientifically rigorous assessment of such threats to Native Americans is a pressing need across southwestern landscapes. This project examined factors affecting Native American tribes, including water rights for fish and wildlife, protection of wetlands, and enhancement and recovery of the Pyramid Lake, Nevada fishery, and protection of important fish species. This project aimed...
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Climate change is poised to alter natural systems, the frequency of extreme weather, and human health and livelihoods. In order to effectively prepare for and respond to these challenges in the north-central region of the U.S., people must have the knowledge and tools to develop plans and adaptation strategies. The objective of this project was to build stakeholders’ capacity to respond to climate change in the north-central U.S., filling in gaps not covered by other projects in the region. During the course of this project, researchers focused on three major activities: Tribal Capacity Building: Researchers provided tribal colleges and universities with mini-grants to develop student projects to document climate-related...
This short-term project responded to concerns about the disappearance of culturally important plants in traditional gathering areas expressed by elders of the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe (PGST) (Olympic Peninsula, WA), both currently and in response to continuing climate change. A formal Memorandum of Understanding was developed between Oregon State University and the PGST to guide this culturally sensitive research. We recommend this formal approach to researchers considering tribal partnerships in order to ensure expectations of all parties are clearly outlined. During formal interviews and informal conversation, PGST elders mentioned 37 plants, of which eight terrestrial species and a group of marine taxa were...
This is a protocol that seeks to protect a federally recognized American Indian tribe’s intellectual property (IP) and traditional knowledge (TK) from unapproved usage, while securing a process through which research ed information can be effectively obtained and disseminated. While acknowledging that each American Indian community may vary regarding its own unique protocol practices, the following document covers four sets of principles and issues which are over-arching recommendations for developing positive communications and collaborative research relationships between a tribe(s) and researchers funded by federal and/or state agencies. Illustrative case examples will be provided throughout this document that...
Based upon the research developed in association with the Sqigwts NKN Climate Change project, this document provides recommendations on how to design inter - actable food producing “Gardens” (the term defined later in this document), with appropriate Indigenous content and pedagogical considerations relating to climate change. The Garden could be used by the Tribe at their discretion to identify, protect and perpetuate the use and locations of traditional, native plants used in the traditional seasonal round . It seeks to demonstrate that both indigenous and sc ientific knowledge can be successfully applied in this endeavor. It seeks to be an educational venue for students and their teachers, and to be a sustainable...
Abstract (from http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10584-013-0852-y): This paper provides an overview of climate change impacts on tribal water resources and the subsequent cascading effects on the livelihoods and cultures of American Indians and Alaska Natives living on tribal lands in the U.S. A hazards and vulnerability framework for understanding these impacts is first presented followed by context on the framework components, including climate, hydrologic, and ecosystem changes (i.e. hazards) and tribe-specific vulnerability factors (socioeconomic, political, infrastructural, environmental, spiritual and cultural), which when combined with hazards lead to impacts. Next regional summaries of impacts...
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The Canadian Aboriginal Lands product consists of polygon entities that depict the administrative boundaries (extent) of lands where the title has been vested in specific Aboriginal Groups of Canada or lands which were set aside for their exclusive benefit. More specifically it includes the following lands:Indian ReservesLands that include:Surrendered lands or a reserve, as defined in the Indian Act. This definition excludes Indian Settlements and Indian Communities.Sechelt lands, as defined in the Sechelt Indian Band Self-Government Act, chapter 27 of the Statutes of Canada, 1986.Land Claim Settlement LandsLands created under Comprehensive Land Claims Process that do not or will not have Indian Reserve status under...
Abstract: The recognition of climate change issues facing tribal communities and indigenous peoples in the United States is growing, and understanding its impacts is rooted in indigenous ethical perspectives and systems of ecological knowledge. This foundation presents a context and guide for contemporary indigenous approaches to address climate change impacts that are comprehensive and holistic. Tribal communities and indigenous peoples across the United States are reenvisioning the role of science in the Anthropocene; working to strengthen government-to-government relationships in climate change initiatives; and leading climate change research, mitigation and adaptation plans through indigenous ingenuity. Unique...
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Native Americans are one of the most vulnerable populations to climate change in the United States because of their reliance upon the natural environment for food, livelihood, and cultural traditions. In the Southwest, where the temperature and precipitation changes from climate change are expected to be particularly severe, tribal communities may be especially vulnerable. Through this project, researchers sought to better understand the climate change threats facing the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of northwestern Nevada. Researchers found that the Tribe’s vulnerability to climate change stems from its dependence on Pyramid Lake, which may experience reduced water supply in the future. This will potentially have negative...
Categories: Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, CASC, Completed, Completed, Completed, All tags...
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This project will improve tribal and First Nation engagement in cooperative natural resource conservation efforts. Researchers are fostering networking among tribes, First Nations and other relevant partners in the upper Midwest – Great Lakes region, and engaging tribal and First Nation representatives in the development of a set of principles and strategies for their authentic, robust inclusion in regional resource conservation cooperative frameworks. The project is conducting an environmental scan of current climate and landscape change planning initiatives as well as mitigation and resilience-building projects being implemented by tribes and First Nations in the region. The results will lead to broader inclusion...
The University of Arizona Native Nations Climate Adaptation Program (NNCAP) and Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS) hosted the NNCAP Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change: A Focus on Climate Adaptation Planning and Implementation at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona on November 12 and 13, 2015. The summit was sponsored by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative, the Agnese Nelms Haury Program in Environment and Social Justice, the Southwest Climate Science Center, and the UA Institute of the Environment (see Appendix D). The primary objective of the Tribal Summit was to convene tribal environmental managers and leaders who have approved climate adaptation plans to share...
Listening for the Rain starts a pluricultural conversation in which some Indigenous people who live in the central United States of America discuss their observations and understandings of, as well as responses to, climate change and variability. A team of Native and non-Native researchers and media artists worked together to document these stories. Not only does Listening to the Rain illustrate some of the environmental transformations distinguishing diverse Tribal landscapes, but the video also suggests some of the proactive solutions and ideas for addressing these issues that are currently being undertaken in Indian Country.
The establishment of the South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) heralded new forms of partnership among Tribal nations and members of the climate science and conservation communities. But communicating key concepts such as risk and vulnerability is a culturally specific practice. So these new relationships call for pluricultural conversations about climate change and variability. To contribute to the goal of mutual understanding, this project developed and implemented a series of five workshops -- four in Oklahoma and one in New Mexico -- that introduced Tribal members and employees across the region to the SC CSC as a resource for their climate adaptation practices. Not counting members of the research team,...
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The Columbia River Basin and the plants and animals it supports have been central to tribal culture and economy in the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, and British Columbia) for thousands of years. Climate change is expected to significantly alter the ecology of the Columbia River Basin, and tribal communities will be especially sensitive to these changes, including possible loss of culturally and economically significant foods such as salmon, deer, root plants, and berries. The purpose of this project was to assess the capacity of tribal communities and organizations in the Columbia River Basin to prepare for and respond to climate change. Researchers surveyed 15 tribes and three...
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This project will improve tribal and First Nation engagement in cooperative natural resource conservation efforts. Researchers are fostering networking among tribes, First Nations and other relevant partners in the upper Midwest – Great Lakes region, and engaging tribal and First Nation representatives in the development of a set of principles and strategies for their authentic, robust inclusion in regional resource conservation cooperative frameworks. The project is conducting an environmental scan of current climate and landscape change planning initiatives as well as mitigation and resilience-building projects being implemented by tribes and First Nations in the region. The results will lead to broader inclusion...
The purpose of this project was to enhance the knowledge of local tribal environmental professionals related to planning for the increased frequency of weather events as a result of climate change. Beyond expanding knowledge, the objective of this workshop introduce the Division of Regional and City Planning faculty and students to the planning needs of tribal communities related to climate change. As a secondary objective, the grantees sought to lay a foundation for building relationships with the regional BIA offices and the tribal environmental professionals for future planning and research activities.
The Columbia River Basin is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest. It is 258,000 square miles in size encompassing large portions of the states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, and Montana as well as British Columbia. Climate change is expected to significantly alter the ecology and economy of the Columbia River Basin and Tribal communities are among the most climate-sensitive. The Columbia and its tributaries have been central to the region's Tribal culture and economy for thousands of years. Models predict warmer temperatures, more precipitation as rainfall and decreased snowfall occur over the next 50 years, which will directly affect the abundance of culturally significant foods, such as salmon, deer,...
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The Wind River Indian Reservation in west-central Wyoming is home to the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes, who reside near and depend on water from the streams that feed into the Wind River. In recent years, however, the region has experienced frequent severe droughts, which have impacted tribal livelihoods and cultural activities. Scientists with the North Central Climate Science Center at Colorado State University, the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and several other university and agency partners are working closely with tribal water managers to assess how drought affects the reservation, integrating social, ecological, and hydro-climatological sciences...


map background search result map search result map Climate Change Vulnerability of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe in the Southwest Manajiwin: Respecting tribes, First nations and cultural resources in cooperative landscape and climate change decision-making Capacity Building in the North-Central U.S.: Tribal Engagement, Climate Training, and PhenoCam Deployment Canadian Aboriginal Lands - GeoBase Web Mapping Service (WMS) Assessing the Capacity of Columbia River Basin Tribes to Address Climate Change The Wind River Indian Reservation’s Vulnerability to the Impacts of Drought and the Development of Decision Tools to Support Drought Preparedness Report: Manajiwin: Respecting tribes, First nations and cultural resources in cooperative landscape and climate change decision-making The Wind River Indian Reservation’s Vulnerability to the Impacts of Drought and the Development of Decision Tools to Support Drought Preparedness Assessing the Capacity of Columbia River Basin Tribes to Address Climate Change Capacity Building in the North-Central U.S.: Tribal Engagement, Climate Training, and PhenoCam Deployment Manajiwin: Respecting tribes, First nations and cultural resources in cooperative landscape and climate change decision-making Report: Manajiwin: Respecting tribes, First nations and cultural resources in cooperative landscape and climate change decision-making Canadian Aboriginal Lands - GeoBase Web Mapping Service (WMS)