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Flow regulation has reduced the exchange of water, energy, and materials between rivers and floodplains, caused declines in native plant populations, and advanced the spread of nonnative plants. Naturalized flow regimes are regarded as a means to restore degraded riparian areas. We examined the effects of flood regime (short [SIFI] vs. long [LIFI] inter-flood interval) on plant community and soil inorganic nitrogen (N) dynamics in riparian forests dominated by native Populus deltoides var. wislizenii Eckenwalder (Rio Grande cottonwood) and nonnative Tamarix chinensis Lour. (salt cedar) along the regulated middle Rio Grande of New Mexico. The frequency of inundation (every 2–3 years) at SIFI sites better reflected...
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Yes, all data values are reasonable and within the valid range for measurement. The data release consists of 15 tabular data files (csv). These data were compiled to compare patterns and potential drivers of leaf litter decomposition in the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam between 1998 and 2022. Objective(s) of our study were to compare the breakdown of cottonwood (Populus fremontii), willow (Salix exigua), and salt cedar (Tamarix chinensis) leaves to a previous decomposition experiment from 1998 (Pomeroy et al. 2000) that was conducted in the context of much cooler water temperatures, higher phosphorus concentrations, lower New Zealand mudsnail densities, and salt cedar litter that was unaffected by...
Categories: Data; Tags: Aquatic Biology, Arizona, Colorado River, Ecology, Geography, All tags...


    map background search result map search result map Environmental, biological, and leaf litter decomposition data in the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam between 1998 and 2022 Environmental, biological, and leaf litter decomposition data in the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam between 1998 and 2022