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Attempts to stabilize the shore can greatly influence rates of shoreline change. Beach nourishment in particular will bias rates of observed shoreline change toward accretion or stability, even though the natural beach, in the absence of nourishment, would be eroding. Trembanis and Pilkey (1998) prepared a summary of identifiable beach nourishment projects in the Gulf Coast region that had been conducted before 1996. Those records were used to identify shoreline segments that had been influenced by beach nourishment. Supplemental information regarding beach nourishment was collected from agencies familiar with nourishment projects in the State. All records were compiled to create a GIS layer depicting the spatial...
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There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by generating historical and modern shoreline data. Shorelines are compiled by state and generally correspond to one of four time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, 1970s, and 1998-2002. Each shoreline may represent a compilation of data from one or more sources for one or more dates provided by one or more agencies. Details regarding source are provided in the ‘Data Quality Information’ section of this metadata report. Shoreline vectors derived from historic...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, Alabama, Baseline, Beach Erosion, Beach Nourishment, All tags...
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Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension developed by the USGS in cooperation with TPMC Environmental Services. The extension is designed to efficiently lead a user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis. This extension to ArcView contains three main components that define a baseline, generate orthogonal transects at a user-defined separation along the coast, and calculate rates of change (linear regression, endpoint rate, average of rates, average of endpoints, jackknife).
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Academics & scientific researchers, Alabama, Baseline, Beach Erosion, Beach Nourishment, All tags...
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Under the direction of some of the leading American scientists of the 19th century, the United States Coast Survey (USCS) created exceptionally accurate and detailed maps of the country's coastline. These surveys (commonly referred to as "T-sheets") are the single most important data source for understanding the physical and ecological characteristics of the US shoreline prior to substantial Euro-American modification. Their depictions of coastal wetlands and estuaries prior to major development are valuable tools for coastal zone planning and estuary management and form an important foundation for more detailed investigations of historical extent and condition of coastal wetlands.Please visit http://www.caltsheets.org...
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Attempts to stabilize the shore can greatly influence rates of shoreline change. Beach nourishment in particular will bias rates of observed shoreline change toward accretion or stability, even though the natural beach, in the absence of nourishment, would be eroding. Trembanis and Pilkey (1998) prepared a summary of identifiable beach nourishment projects in the Gulf Coast region that had been conducted before 1996. Those records were used to identify shoreline segments that had been influenced by beach nourishment. Supplemental information regarding beach nourishment was collected from agencies familiar with nourishment projects in the State. All records were compiled to create a GIS layer depicting the spatial...
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There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by generating historical and modern shoreline data. Shorelines are compiled by state and generally correspond to one of four time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, 1970s, and 1998-2002. Each shoreline may represent a compilation of data from one or more sources for one or more dates provided by one or more agencies. Details regarding source are provided in the 'Data Quality Information' section of this metadata report. Shoreline vectors derived from historic...


    map background search result map search result map Beach Nourishment in the Gulf of Mexico Historical Changes in Shoreline in the Gulf of Mexico Historical Wetlands of the Southern California Coast Beach Nourishment in the Gulf of Mexico Historical Changes in Shoreline in the Gulf of Mexico Long Term Shoreline Change Rates Historical Wetlands of the Southern California Coast Beach Nourishment in the Gulf of Mexico Beach Nourishment in the Gulf of Mexico Historical Changes in Shoreline in the Gulf of Mexico Long Term Shoreline Change Rates Historical Changes in Shoreline in the Gulf of Mexico