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Study area Hudson River from Hyde Park to Yonkers, N.Y. Period of project Continuous since October 1991 Problem - The location of the salt front (freshwater-saltwater interface) in the lower Hudson River basin can affect wildlife habitats and freshwater withdrawals for municipal use. Knowing the location of the salt front can help managers make informed decisions to protect the environment, maintain drinking water standards, and issue health advisories pertaining to drinking water, if needed. Objectives - Estimate the location of the salt front (defined as 100mg/L chloride) in the lower Hudson River. Specifically, collect water-surface elevation, specific conductance, and water-temperature data at three gages...
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Introduction High nitrate concentrations are a common concern among many purveyors, including the Suffolk County Water Authority (SCWA), the largest supplier of water to residents in Suffolk County. Typically, the amount of nitrate in groundwater is related to land use, where the greatest concentrations are observed in agricultural regions. In many areas, the nitrate concentration has increased steadily in recent years, even in areas that are no longer farmed and are now sewered. A statistical analysis for trends of over 20 years in nitrate concentration data from SCWA wells is needed to determine the susceptibility of supply-wells to exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for nitrate. This information is essential...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Contaminants, Natural, Contaminants, Natural, Contaminants, natural, Cooperative Water Program, GW Model, All tags...
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Introduction The upper Esopus Creek watershed is located in the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York State and covers 497 km2 from Slide Mountain, the highest peak in the Catskills at 1,274 m, to the Ashokan Reservoir at 193 m elevation (fig. 1). Suspended sediment and turbidity are primary water quality concerns in the Ashokan Reservoir watershed, part of the New York City Catskill-Delaware water supply system that supplies more than 10 million people a day with clean drinking water. Stream corridor assessments of tributaries to the Upper Esopus Creek by Ulster County Soil and Water Conservation District, New York City Department of Environmental Protection, and State University of New York at New Paltz summer...
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The current information available for the Genesee River and watershed is insufficient to assess if the Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) delisting criteria for the Rochester Embayment Area of Concern (AOC) can or have been met. With on-going and future projects that are implementing best practices to control soil erosion and the reduction of nutrients that reach the Rochester Embayment, the river and the watershed, it becomes a necessity to: 1.) collect more frequent Total Suspended Sediment (TSS) data for the Genesee River both within and outside of the AOC; and 2.) to have a study design capable of evaluating the impact/success of the current and proposed GLRI projects in the watershed. This project is envisioned...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: BMP, Best-Management Practices, Best-Management Practices, Best-Management Practices, CAFO, All tags...
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Coastal Hydrology and Storm Surge Storm-surge is one of the most powerful and destructive elements of major storm events. Excessively high tides associated with storms can flood and inundate coastal areas, often moving sediment and altering coastal landscapes and drainages. USGS provides critical expertise in measuring storm surge and assessing conditions both before and after the storm. Through development of storm tide monitoring networks, data analysis, and data delivery, USGS provides vital information to help coastal communities prepare for and recover from storm surge events. View Fact Sheet Science Science Support for Tribes Tide gage/weather station installed in collaboration with Mashpee-Wampanoag Tribe....
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In 1979, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into a cooperative agreement with Monroe County (MC), which, over the span of more than three decades, has resulted in more than 30 reports that have summarized flow and water-quality data at sites in Monroe County and have presented the results of investigations of particular water-related issues that existed in the County. The collaborative relationship between Monroe County and the USGS entails: - USGS training and oversight of MC personnel to conduct site visits and measure streamflow and collect water samples at monitoring sites; - analyses of water samples by MC in a certified environmental laboratory that routinely participates in a USGS quality-control program...
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Summary: This study aims to do a thorough analysis of trends in peak streamflows on Long Island. Reliable information about the magnitude and frequency of floods is essential for flood insurance studies, flood-plain management, and the design of transportation and water-conveyance infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, culverts, dams, and levees. Federal, State, regional, and local officials need peak flow information to effectively plan and manage land use and water resources, protect lives and property in flood-prone areas, and determine flood-insurance rates, particularly in densely populated urban areas. Long Island is a regional economic driver which has experienced public health and safety issues due to extreme...
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Problem Surface-water information is needed for planning, design, hazard warning, and operation and management in water-related fields such as water supply, hydroelectric power, flood control, irrigation, bridge and culvert design, wildlife management, pollution abatement, flood-plain management, and water-resources development. Appropriate historical and real-time surface-water data, such as stream flow and stage, reservoir levels, and water temperature, are necessary to properly assess, manage and protect water resources. Objectives Collect timely and high quality surface-water data for (1) assessment of water resources; (2) operation of reservoirs or industries; (3) forecasting flow; (4) disposal of wastes...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Climate Impacts, Climate Impacts, Climate Research and Development, Climate impacts, Cooperative Water Program, All tags...
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PROBLEM As part of an effort to sustain a viable water-supply system for 8 million residents in New York City, and 1 million other residents in upstate New York that rely on City water, the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) has requested a multi-disciplinary study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine the source(s) of water to surface-water sites (springs and expressions) in areas adjacent to the Catskill Aqueduct. In the area near the Delaware Aqueduct, which has been determined by the USGS to have a water-tunnel contribution to flooding issues during periods of high precipitation, the NYCDEP plans to repair the leaks with a grouting procedure. However, without monitoring...
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The coastal areas of southeastern New York (fig. 1) are highly vulnerable to tidal flooding (fig. 2). Timely evacuation of people from flood-threatened areas in advance of approaching hurricanes and nor'easters (northeast coastal storms) requires adequate flood-warning time. To begin addressing this need for immediate information on coastal flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Town of Hempstead Department of Conservation & Waterways, Village of Freeport, and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, has operated a network of real-time tidal water-elevation and meteorological stations since 1997 in the coastal areas of Long Island and New York City. Each tidal water-elevation...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Climate Impacts, Climate Impacts, Climate impacts, Coastal Science, Coastal Science, All tags...
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Problem Coastal communities are susceptible to damage from coastal storms and associated storm surge, and although tidal wetlands provide a buffer against shoreline erosion and aid in shoreline stabilization, they too are vulnerable to the action of storms. Tidal wetland dynamics need to be better understood, as they are also intrinsically valuable as nursery, feeding, and refuge areas for many commercial and recreational fisheries, and significantly contribute to the base of the marine food web. Wetlands trap sediments, reduce turbidity, and absorb nutrients and pollutants thereby improving water quality, and they provide many recreational opportunities. Tidal wetland stability needs to be assessed using a sediment...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Beach and Barrier dynamics, Climate and Land-Use Change, Climate and Land-Use Change, Climate and Land-Use Change, Coastal Science, All tags...
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The St. Lawrence River at Massena Remedial Action Plan (RAP) Area of Concern (AOC) begins above the power dam facilities and seaway locks at the Massena Village drinking water intake and follows the river downstream for about fifteen miles to the international border. For New York State, the AOC includes portions of the Grasse, Raquette and St. Regis Rivers. There are three governmental agency groupings that share jurisdictional responsibilities for the AOC. These are the United States, Canada, and the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe at Akwesasne. The Cornwall portion of the AOC includes lands in Ontario, Quebec, and the Mohawks extending downstream of the power dam to the eastern outlet of Lake St. Francis. Since 2010,...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is collaborating with the New York Department of State (NYDOS) Office of Planning and Development to prepare a new Long Island South Shore Estuary Reserve (SSER) Coordinated Water Resources Monitoring Strategy (CWRMS). Since 2000, when the last CWRMS was published, numerous research projects and studies are demonstrating several new threats to the ecologic health and resilience of the SSER. Contemporary threats include: Eutrophic conditions brought on by high levels of nutrients from sewage treatment plant discharges, stormwater runoff, groundwater seepage, and atmospheric contributions; Increased occurrences of harmful algal blooms in the past 15 years; and, Growing concern...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Assessment, Biogeochemical and Hydrologic Assessment, BiogeochemicalandHydrologicAssessment, Climate and Land-Use Change, Climate and Land-Use Change, All tags...
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Problem - Urbanization of the 150-square-mile Irondequoit Creek basin in Monroe and Ontario Counties, N.Y., continues to spread southward and eastward from the City of Rochester. Conversion of forested land to other uses over the past 40 years has increased to the extent that more than 50 percent of the basin is now developed. This expansion has increased flooding and impaired stream-water quality in the northern (downstream) half of the basin. A precipitation-runoff model of the Irondequoit Creek basin could be used as a management tool by water-resources managers to better understand the hydrology of the basin, permit simulation of planned or hypothetical land-use changes, evaluate the adverse effects of future...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Climate Change, Climate Change, Climate Change, Completed, Cooperative Water Program, All tags...
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Problem The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) intends to develop a Nine-Element Watershed Plan (http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/103264.html) for the Lake Erie/Niagara Basin. To develop the Nine-Element Plan, NYSDEC needs a high quality, quality assured, nutrient-loading dataset to serve as a baseline against which future change can be measured and to identify areas in greatest need of water quality improvement. Objective and Scope The objective of this project is to collect baseline nutrient water-quality data that can be used to 1) build a watershed model that will help focus future water quality improvement efforts in the basin, and 2) aid in future regional target-setting efforts...
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Objective: The USGS New York Water Science Center (NYWSC) works with other Federal agencies as well as with State, municipal, and tribal agencies to provide research and data about water-related issues. Relevance and Impact: The NYWSC leads the scientific and water-resources management communities by providing high-quality, timely, and unbiased scientific data, reports, and other information that are widely accessible and understandable and that benefit science interests of all levels of government, academia, nongovernmental organizations, the private sector, and the general public. Statement of Problem: The NYWSC studies the effects of weather, climate, and manmade influences on groundwater levels, streamflow (discharge),...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Beach and Barrier Dynamics, Beach and Barrier Dynamics, Beach and Barrier dynamics, Coastal Science, Coastal Science, All tags...
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Problem The Esopus Creek is located in the Catskill Mountains of New York State and is part of New York City’s water supply system. In 1915 damming of a portion of the creek formed the Ashokan Reservoir splitting the creek into upper (upstream of the reservoir) and lower (downstream of the reservoir) segments. The Ashokan Reservoir watershed is 255 mi2 and is one of two reservoirs in the New York City Catskill Reservoir system and one of six reservoirs in the West-of-Hudson Catskill-Delaware system. The upper Esopus Creek watershed is approximately 192 mi2 from the source, Winnisook Lake, and the Ashokan Reservoir near Boiceville, NY, (Smith et al. 2008). From 2009 to 2012, suspended-sediment concentrations...
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Problem Previous hydrologic studies have indicated that there may be sufficient water resources underlying Queens, Kings, Richmond, New York, and Bronx Counties for use as a supplemental water supply in times of drought or other emergency. An extensive ground-water and surface-water monitoring program is necessary to provide a comprehensive hydrologic data set for use in ongoing and future ground-water investigations. Objective The project will provide a continuous hydrologic data set needed for resource assessment, planning, and protection. To meet this objective the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, maintains and operates a network of approximately...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Climate Impacts, Climate Impacts, Climate impacts, Contaminants, Emerging, Contaminants, Emerging, All tags...
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Problem Suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and turbidity are primary water-quality concerns in New York City’s (NYC) water-supply system (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007). In the NYC water-supply system turbidity is largely caused by clay and silt rather than organic material (Effler et al. 1998, Peng et al. 2002, 2004). Sediment can originate from the watershed land surface and the active stream corridor (the stream bed and its adjacent banks and hillslopes) (Walling 2005). In the upper Esopus Creek watershed, the main source of water to the Ashokan Reservoir, the active stream corridor is the primary source of sediment and turbidity to the stream. Terrestrial sources of sediment and turbidity are...
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The current Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring Program combines monitoring of streams and soils based on a watershed design. Not only are headwater streams an important component of Adirondack ecosystems, they are closely tied to the terrestrial environment through runoff that is strongly influenced by soil and vegetation processes. This linkage makes headwater streams a useful tool for monitoring the overall condition of the watershed, and by combining stream and soil monitoring within watersheds, the response of Adirondack ecosystems to environmental disturbances such as acid rain and climate change can be better understood. For example, the unexpectedly slow reversal of stream acidification from decreased atmospheric...


map background search result map search result map Simulation and Analysis of the Effects of Land-Use Changes and Stormflow Detention Basins on Flooding and Nonpoint-Source Pollution, in Irondequoit Creek Basin, Monroe and Ontario Counties, New York Hudson River Salt-Front Monitoring Project, New York Effects of Stream Restoration and Bank Stabilization on Suspended Sediment in Tributaries to the Upper Esopus Creek Southeastern New York Tide-Telemetry and Coastal-Flood-Warning System Estuarine Physical Response to Storms—Jamaica Bay Surface-Water Data Collection in New York Hydrologic-Data Collection in the Five Boroughs of New York City Trends in Nitrate Concentrations in Public Water-Supply Wells, Suffolk County, New York, 1982-2008 Estimating Loading Above and Below Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Combined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in the Genesee River Watershed Development of a Coordinated Water Resources Monitoring Strategy for the South Shore Estuary Reserve, Long Island NY Hurricane Sandy -- Science to support coastal resilience St. Lawrence Monitoring Network – Lake Ontario Lake Management Plan Massena, NY Area of Concern (AOC) Adirondack Long-Term Stream and Soil Monitoring Water Resources of Monroe County, New York Esopus Sub Basin Sediment and Turbidity Monitoring Stony Clove Basin Sediment and Turbidity Monitoring New York Water Science Center Data Program Hydrogeologic and Geochemical  Assessment of the Effects of Leakage from the Catskill and Delaware Aqueducts on the Local Bedrock and Overburden Aquifers in Southeastern New York Surface-water quality in the Lake Erie/Niagara River Basin of New York State An Analysis of Trends in the Magnitude of Floods in Urbanized Watersheds on Long Island, New York Estuarine Physical Response to Storms—Jamaica Bay Simulation and Analysis of the Effects of Land-Use Changes and Stormflow Detention Basins on Flooding and Nonpoint-Source Pollution, in Irondequoit Creek Basin, Monroe and Ontario Counties, New York Effects of Stream Restoration and Bank Stabilization on Suspended Sediment in Tributaries to the Upper Esopus Creek Esopus Sub Basin Sediment and Turbidity Monitoring Stony Clove Basin Sediment and Turbidity Monitoring Hudson River Salt-Front Monitoring Project, New York Hydrologic-Data Collection in the Five Boroughs of New York City Water Resources of Monroe County, New York Development of a Coordinated Water Resources Monitoring Strategy for the South Shore Estuary Reserve, Long Island NY Surface-water quality in the Lake Erie/Niagara River Basin of New York State Trends in Nitrate Concentrations in Public Water-Supply Wells, Suffolk County, New York, 1982-2008 St. Lawrence Monitoring Network – Lake Ontario Lake Management Plan Massena, NY Area of Concern (AOC) Estimating Loading Above and Below Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) and Combined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in the Genesee River Watershed Hydrogeologic and Geochemical  Assessment of the Effects of Leakage from the Catskill and Delaware Aqueducts on the Local Bedrock and Overburden Aquifers in Southeastern New York An Analysis of Trends in the Magnitude of Floods in Urbanized Watersheds on Long Island, New York Adirondack Long-Term Stream and Soil Monitoring Southeastern New York Tide-Telemetry and Coastal-Flood-Warning System Surface-Water Data Collection in New York New York Water Science Center Data Program Hurricane Sandy -- Science to support coastal resilience