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We developed a spatially explicit model that simulated future southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis, SPB) dynamics and pine forest management for a real landscape over 60 years to inform regional forest management. The SPB has a considerable effect on forest dynamics in the Southeastern United States, especially in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands that are managed for timber production. Regional outbreaks of SPB occur in bursts resulting in elimination of entire stands and major economic loss. These outbreaks are often interspersed with decades of inactivity, making long-term modeling of SPB dynamics challenging. Forest management techniques, including thinning, have proven effective and are often recommended...
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Basin boundaries were delineated for 1,320 USGS streamgages located on tributaries and streams flowing to the Gulf of Mexico. Basins ranged in size from less than 1 to approximately 67,500 square miles. Physical and climatic basin characteristics were calculated using these boundaries. Data presented here will be used as independent variables to estimate streamflow characteristics and provide a numerical foundation supporting the: (1) development of statistical models of streamflow characteristics; (2) evaluation of spatial and temporal trends in streamflow characteristics; and (3) development of network optimization analysis.
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This dataset may also be used as a stand-alone product to illustrate potential changes in marsh and coastal environments due to longterm sea level rise. This dataset is output from the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) for the South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative (SAMBI) geographic planning region. It represents one 10 year increment (ranging from year 2000 - year 2100) for the climate change scenario A1b. More information about these data (along with downloadable datasets) can be found at http://www.basic.ncsu.edu/dsl/slr.html
In the Southeastern U.S. rapid urbanization is a major challenge to developing long-term conservation strategies. The SAMBI DSL project used predicted urban growth models described herein to inform future landscape conditions that were also based climate change impacts and vegetative community succession. These future landscape conditions were then applied as a context for land use and management decisions in conservation planning. SLEUTH, named for the model input datasets (Slope, Land use, Excluded, Urban, Transportation and Hillshade) is the evolutionary product of the Clarke Urban Growth Model that uses cellular automata, terrain mapping and land cover change modeling to address urban growth (Jantz et al, 2009;...
In the Southeastern U.S. rapid urbanization is a major challenge to developing long-term conservation strategies. The SAMBI DSL project used predicted urban growth models described herein to inform future landscape conditions that were also based climate change impacts and vegetative community succession. These future landscape conditions were then applied as a context for land use and management decisions in conservation planning. SLEUTH, named for the model input datasets (Slope, Land use, Excluded, Urban, Transportation and Hillshade) is the evolutionary product of the Clarke Urban Growth Model that uses cellular automata, terrain mapping and land cover change modeling to address urban growth (Jantz et al, 2009;...
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A highly permeable landscape promotes resilience by facilitating range shifts and the reorganization of communities. Roads, development, dams, and other structures create resistance that interrupts or redirects movement and, therefore, lowers the permeability. Maintaining a connected landscape is the most widely cited strategy in the scientific literature for building resilience and has been suggested as an explanation for why there were few extinctions during the last period of comparable rapid climate change. This metric is an important component of resilience because it indicates whether a process is likely to be disrupted or how much access a species has to the micro-climates within its given neighborhood. ...
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A climate-resilient conservation portfolio includes sites representative of all geophysical settings selected for their landscape diversity and local connectedness. We developed methods to identify such a portfolio. First, we mapped geophysical settings across the entire study area. Second, within each geophysical setting we located sites with diverse topography that were highly connected by natural cover. Third, we compared the identified sites with the current network of conservation lands and with The Nature Conservancy’s (TNC’s) portfolio of important biodiversity sites identified based on rare species and natural community locations.Using this information we noted geophysical settings that were underrepresented...
Winter climate change has the potential to have a large impact on coastal wetlands in the southeastern United States. Warmer winter temperatures and reductions in the intensity of freeze events would likely lead to mangrove forest range expansion and salt marsh displacement in parts of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast. The objective of this research was to better evaluate the ecological implications of mangrove forest migration and salt marsh displacement. The potential ecological impacts of mangrove migration are diverse, ranging from important biotic impacts (e.g., coastal fisheries, land bird migration; colonial-nesting wading birds) to ecosystem stability (e.g., response to sea-level rise and drought;...
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Human alteration of waterways has impacted the minimum and maximum streamflow in more than 86% of monitored streams nationally and may be the primary cause for ecological impairment in river and stream ecosystems. Restoration of freshwater inflows can positively affect shellfish, fisheries, habitat, and water quality in streams, rivers, and estuaries. Increasingly, state and local decision makers and Federal agencies are turning their attention to the restoration of flows as part of a holistic approach to restoring water quality and habitat and protecting and replenishing living coastal and marine resources and the livelihoods that depend on them. In 2017, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Lower Mississippi-Gulf...
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A simple water budget includes precipitation, streamflow, change in storage, evapotranspiration, and residuals: P=Q + ET + ΔS + e. It is essential to include the managed component (i.e., the “human” component) to close the water budget and reduce the magnitude of the residuals from “natural” water budgets. Some of the largest components of managed water withdraws are public supply, irrigation, and thermoelectric. The modified water budget is: P=Q + ET + ΔS + (PS + Irr + TE) + e, where PS is public supply, Irr is irrigation, and TE is thermoelectric water use. This data release contains both the natural and managed components of the water budget for a region within the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River...
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This dataset provides numerical and categorical descriptions of 48 basin characteristics for 956 basins with observed streamflow information at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations. Characteristics are indexed by National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) version 2 COMID (integer that uniquely identifies each feature in the NHD) and USGS station number for streamflow-gaging station. The variables represent mutable and immutable basin characteristics and are organized by characteristic type: physical (5), hydrologic (6), categorical (12), climate (6), landscape alteration (7), and land cover (12). Mutable characteristics such as climate, land cover, and landscape alteration variables are reported in decadal...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.12919/abstract;jsessionid=64EF530762E939D509B9B308CD377394.f03t04): Anthropogenic climate change has altered temperate forest phenology, but how these trends will play out in the future is controversial. We measured the effect of experimental warming of 0.6–5.0 °C on the phenology of a diverse suite of 11 plant species in the deciduous forest understory (Duke Forest, North Carolina, USA) in a relatively warm year (2011) and a colder year (2013). Our primary goal was to dissect how temperature affects timing of spring budburst, flowering, and autumn leaf coloring for functional groups with different growth habits, phenological niches, and xylem anatomy....
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This dataset provides numerical and categorical descriptions of 48 basin characteristics for 9,314 ungaged basins coinciding with 12-digit hydrologic unit code (HUC12) pour points that drain to the Gulf of Mexico. Characteristics are indexed by National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) version 2 COMID (integer that uniquely identifies each feature in the NHD) and HUC12 identifying number. The variables represent mutable and immutable basin characteristics and are organized by characteristic type: physical (5), hydrologic (6), categorical (12), climate (6), landscape alteration (7), and land cover (12). Mutable characteristics such as climate, land cover, and landscape alteration variables are reported in decadal increments...
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A simple water budget includes precipitation, streamflow, change in storage, evapotranspiration, and residuals: P=Q + ET + ΔS + e. It is essential to include the managed component (i.e., the “human” component) to close the water budget and reduce the magnitude of the residuals from “natural” water budgets. Some of the largest components of managed water withdraws are public supply, irrigation, and thermoelectric. The modified water budget is: P=Q + ET + ΔS + (PS + Irr + TE) + e, where PS is public supply, Irr is irrigation, and TE is thermoelectric water use. This data release contains both the natural and managed components of the water budget for a region within the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River...
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This dataset may also be used as a stand-alone product to illustrate potential changes in marsh and coastal environments due to longterm sea level rise. This dataset is output from the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) for the South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative (SAMBI) geographic planning region. It represents one 10 year increment (ranging from year 2000 - year 2100) for the climate change scenario A1FI. More information about these data (along with downloadable datasets) can be found at http://www.basic.ncsu.edu/dsl/slr.html
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North American freshwater mussels are in serious decline as a result of pollution and habitat destruction from human activities. In addition, many mussel species are living in habitats that push the upper limits of their heat tolerance, which may become problematic as the climate and, as a result, water temperatures warm. As part of this project, we created a set of models to predict how freshwater mussels would respond to climate change effects. Our primary objective was to help federal and state natural resource managers forecast how mussel species will respond to climate change over the next 30 to 50 years, so that managers can develop appropriate adaptation strategies to address these changes. Additionally,...
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The GAP National Terrestrial Ecosystems - Ver 3.0 is a 2011 update of the National Gap Analysis Program Land Cover Data - Version 2.2 for the conterminous U.S. The GAP National Terrestrial Ecosystems - Version 3.0 represents a highly thematically detailed land cover map of the U.S. The map legend includes types described by NatureServe's Ecological Systems Classification (Comer et al. 2002) as well as land use classes described in the National Land Cover Dataset 2011 (Homer et al. 2015). These data cover the entire continental U.S. and are a continuous data layer. These raster data have a 30 m x 30 m cell resolution. GAP used the best information available to create the land cover data; however GAP seeks to improve...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WMS Layer; Tags: Alabama, Alaska, Appalachian, Arizona, Arkansas, All tags...
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Censored and uncensored generalized additive models (GAMs) are developed from 955 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations (streamgages) to predict decadal statistics of streamflow. The streamgages are located on streams draining to the Gulf of Mexico. Decadal statistics include no-flow fractions and selected L-moments of nonzero streamflow for six decades (1950s—2000s). These statistics represent metrics of decadal flow-duration curves (dFDCs) derived from about 10 million daily mean streamflows. The L-moments include the mean, coefficient of L-variation, and the third through fifth L-moment ratios. The models are fit using watershed properties such as basin area and slope, decadal precipitation and temperature...
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This dataset may also be used as a stand-alone product to illustrate potential changes in marsh and coastal environments due to longterm sea level rise. This dataset is output from the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) for the South Atlantic Migratory Bird Initiative (SAMBI) geographic planning region. It represents one 10 year increment (ranging from year 2000 - year 2100) for the climate change scenario B1. More information about these data (along with downloadable datasets) can be found at http://www.basic.ncsu.edu/dsl/slr.html
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We used NLCD 2011, SSURGO, and SEGAP data to map the density of desired resources for open pine ecosystems and six focal species of birds and 2 reptiles within the historic range of longleaf pine east of the Mississippi River. Binary rasters were created of sites with desired characteristics such as land form, hydrology, land use and land cover, soils, potential habitat for focal species, and putative source populations of focal species. Each raster was smoothed using a kernel density estimator. Rasters were combined and scaled to map priority locations for the management of each focal species. Species’ rasters were combined and scaled to provide maps of overall priority for birds and for birds and reptiles. For...


map background search result map search result map Modeling the Response of Freshwater Mussels to Changes in Water Temperature, Habitat, and Streamflow SLAMM Sea Level Rise Model - A1Fi SLAMM Sea Level Rise Model - B1 SLAMM Sea Level Rise Model - A1b GAP/LANDFIRE National Terrestrial Ecosystems 2011 Local Connectedness Stratified by Setting and Ecoregion with Regional Override, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada Landscape Diversity Stratified by Geophysical Setting and Ecoregion with Regional Override, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada Basin characteristics for sites used in RESTORE Streamflow alteration assessments Prioritization of areas for open pine ecosystem restoration in the Southeastern United States: All Species Heuristically-determined geospatial boundary of streams and rivers draining to the Gulf of Mexico in the south-central and southeastern United States, July 2018 Natural and managed components of the water-budget from 2008–2012 for 43 HUC10s in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Georgia, U.S. Summary of basin characteristics for National Hydrography Dataset, version 2 catchments in the southeastern United States, 1950 - 2010 at USGS streamflow-gaging stations Summary of basin characteristics for National Hydrography Dataset, version 2 catchments in the southeastern United States, 1950 - 2010 at 12-digit hydrologic unit code (HUC12) pour points Natural and managed components of the water-budget from 2008–2012 for 43 HUC10s in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Georgia, U.S. Summary of Decadal No-Flow Fractions and Decadal L-Moments of Nonzero Streamflow Flow-Duration Curves for National Hydrography Dataset, Version 2 Catchments in the Southeastern United States, 1950 - 2010, at 12-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC12) Pour Points Natural and managed components of the water-budget from 2008–2012 for 43 HUC10s in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Georgia, U.S. Natural and managed components of the water-budget from 2008–2012 for 43 HUC10s in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Georgia, U.S. SLAMM Sea Level Rise Model - B1 SLAMM Sea Level Rise Model - A1Fi SLAMM Sea Level Rise Model - A1b Prioritization of areas for open pine ecosystem restoration in the Southeastern United States: All Species Heuristically-determined geospatial boundary of streams and rivers draining to the Gulf of Mexico in the south-central and southeastern United States, July 2018 Summary of basin characteristics for National Hydrography Dataset, version 2 catchments in the southeastern United States, 1950 - 2010 at USGS streamflow-gaging stations Summary of basin characteristics for National Hydrography Dataset, version 2 catchments in the southeastern United States, 1950 - 2010 at 12-digit hydrologic unit code (HUC12) pour points Summary of Decadal No-Flow Fractions and Decadal L-Moments of Nonzero Streamflow Flow-Duration Curves for National Hydrography Dataset, Version 2 Catchments in the Southeastern United States, 1950 - 2010, at 12-digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC12) Pour Points Basin characteristics for sites used in RESTORE Streamflow alteration assessments Local Connectedness Stratified by Setting and Ecoregion with Regional Override, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada Landscape Diversity Stratified by Geophysical Setting and Ecoregion with Regional Override, 2016 Eastern U.S. and Canada Modeling the Response of Freshwater Mussels to Changes in Water Temperature, Habitat, and Streamflow GAP/LANDFIRE National Terrestrial Ecosystems 2011